Bay Astro – Events of Week of 07/17/2017 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
==================================

Monday, 07/17/17
07:30 PM – 09:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Why?: What Makes Us Curious

Astrophysicist and bestselling author Mario Livio describes cutting-edge research in psychology and neuroscience in an exploration of the origin and mechanisms of human curiosity. His latest book, “Why?” weaves current findings with fascinating stories of such paragons of curiosity as inventor Leonardo da Vinci and physicist Richard Feynman, alongside interviews with physicist Fabiola Gianotti, astrophysicist/rock guitarist Brian May, linguist Noam Chomsky, and others who weigh in on what drove them to be at the top of their fields.

Website: http://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/why-what-makes-us-curious

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members

==================================

Tuesday, 07/18/17
07:30 PM – 09:00 PM

Kepler’s Books
1010 El Camino Real
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Why We Ask ‘Why?’ with Astrophysicist Mario Livio
“Why?” —

It’s the question that sits at the heart of our quest for knowledge and understanding.

Astrophysicist Mario Livio traveled deep into the impulsiveness of our inquiry, interviewing dozens of question-seekers in fields from biology, mathematics, neuroscience and all the way to rock & roll to discover just why it is we ask, why

At the heart of Livio’s investigation are two geniuses: Leonardo da Vinci and Richard Feynman. Through their probing and furiously curious minds, Livio shows how science has asked an almost infinite number of questions, but very little is known about the root of that insatiable curiosity

Mario Livio is an internationally known astrophysicist, a bestselling author, and a popular speaker who has appeared on The Daily Show, 60 Minutes, and NOVA. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Besides Why? What Makes Us Curious, he is the author of The Golden Ratio, a highly-acclaimed book for which he received the International Pythagoras Prize and the Peano Prize; The Equation That Couldn’t Be Solved; Is God a Mathematician? (which was the basis for the 2016 Emmy-nominated NOVA program The Great Math Mystery); the national bestseller Brilliant Blunders; and The Accelerating Universe. He lives in Baltimore, Maryland.

Website: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/basci/2937645

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 07/18/17 7:45 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Presidio Officer’s Club
50 Moraga Ave
San Francisco, CA 94129

Peering through Jupiter’s Clouds with Keck and the VLA

Despite the fact that Jupiter has been observed for decades from the ground and in situ by spacecraft, we still do not know its bulk composition nor do we understand its global atmospheric dynamics well. The sensitivity upgrade to the Very Large Array (VLA), combined with novel data reduction techniques, has enabled us to produce detailed longitude-resolved maps of Jupiter’s atmosphere at different wavelengths. Since at these wavelengths the main source of opacity is ammonia gas, our maps provide a 3D picture of ammonia gas in Jupiter’s atmosphere, within and below the planet’s visible cloud layers. These maps reveal upward and downward motions within the turbulent atmosphere, and bear a striking resemblance to visible- light images taken by amateur astronomers and Hubble.

At the 10-m Keck telescope we use 5-micron spectroscopy which provides complementary information on cloud altitudes and composition. The results provide important context for NASA’s Juno spacecraft, that arrived at Jupiter on July 4th, 2016, after a five year flight.

Speaker: Imke de Pater, UC Berkeley

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 07/20/17 5:00 PM

Cafe Scientifique Silicon Valley
HanaHaus
456 University Ave
Palo Alto, CA 94301

Gravitational Waves From Astronomical Objects: Theory to Observation
We are now at the dawn of gravitational wave astronomy. On September 14, 2015 at 2:50am PDT, Advanced LIGO made the world’s first direct observation of gravitational waves. These waves emanated from the collision and merger of 2 black holes a billion light years away, each about 30 times the mass of the sun and spinning around each other at half the speed of light. Since then, Advanced LIGO has observed more events like this. This talk will explore the basics of gravitational waves from Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity and the history of gravitational wave detection from the earliest detectors on Earth to future observatories in space. We will then take a look at the results from first observed black hole mergers. Surprisingly, gravitational waves are a lot like sound waves, so we’ll listen to the sounds of distant black hole collisions. Finally, we’ll take a peak inside the Advanced LIGO observatories to see what’s involved in this new field of astronomy.

Speaker: Brett Shapiro, Stanford

Website: http://www.cafescipa.org

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 07/21/17
07:00 PM – 08:30 PM

Pacific Grove Museum of Natural History
165 Forest Ave
Pacific Grove, CA 93950

Total Solar Eclipse
On August 21st, 2017, a total solar eclipse will sweep eastward across the western United States. Along the narrow eclipse path, night will fall, birds will go to roost, stars will appear, and the glorious one million-degree solar corona will blossom overhead. This, and the eclipse of 2045, will be the only total solar eclipses visible on the west coast in the 21st Century.

Dr. Bruce Weaver, Director of the Monterey Institute for Research in Astronomy, will explain the incredible coincidences that makes solar eclipses possible and unique in our solar system. The class will include detailed instructions on how to safely observe an eclipse, what to look for, and how to make the most of this heavenly spectacular. He has led solar eclipse tours to the Caribbean, the Pacific Coast of Mexico, the Mediterranean, and China.

Website: http://www.pgmuseum.org/museum-events/total-solar-eclipse

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 07/21/17 7:30 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers
1893 N. Vasco Rd
Unitarian Universalist Church
Livermore, CA 94551

On Becoming a Spacefaring Society

If we ever hope to become a true spacefaring society, we must wean ourselves away from chemical rockets. This premise will be proven through an examination of Tsiolkovsky’s Rocket Equation where it will become apparent that adding fuel achieves diminishing returns, but increasing exhaust gas velocity offers rapid transits to Mars, the outer planets, and eventually the nearby stars. There is an upper limit to the exhaust gas velocity of chemical rockets. To improve on this we must revisit nuclear thermal rockets, and eventually, fusion rockets, and finally antimatter rockets. Each of these technologies is feasible although considerable engineering and infrastructure development remains to be done. This technological evolution will be presented in Fulsang’s series of hard SciFi novels in the Galactican Series. This lecture will be delivered at the high school physics level.

Speaker: Ejner Fulsang

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 7/21/2017 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!
For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 7/21/2017 and Sat. 7/22/2017

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES

for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 7/21/2017 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 7/22/2017 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Sunday, 07/23/17

12:00 PM – 04:00 PM

Lawrence Hall of Science
1 Centennial Drive
Berkeley, CA 94720

Phenomenal Physics: Sunday Funday
Team up with others and explore the weird and wondrous world of electrical and physical phenomena. Watch our physics expert conduct a series of high-voltage experiments, including a hair-raising Tesla coil demonstration.

Shows at 12:00 and 3:00

Website: http://events.berkeley.edu/index.php/calendar/sn/lhs.html?event_ID=109425&date=2017-07-23

Cost: $12.00 Adults, $10.00 $10 Children 3–18, Seniors 62+, Free Members, children age 2 and under, UC Berkeley students and staff.

==================================

Sunday, 07/23/17
01:00 PM – 04:00 PM

Exploratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green St)
San Francisco, CA 94111

Full-Spectrum Science: Heat and Temperature
Join Exploratorium scientist Ron Hipschman for colorful explorations of the physical world.

What’s the difference between heat and temperature? We use the terms interchangeably, but they have precise meanings to physicists. How does your thermostat work and how does a Thermos® know to keep a hot thing hot and a cold thing cold? The mysteries will be revealed in this talk

Since joining the Exploratorium in 1971, Ron Hipschman has worked as an exhibit developer, author, teacher, and webcast host. He currently works on the Exploratorium’s Environmental Initiative, implementing and maintaining a collection of environmental monitoring sensors and developing visualizations for the Fisher Bay Observatory Gallery’s super-resolution media wall. In addition to Full-Spectrum Science, Ron hosts the monthly After Dark series Everything Matters: Tales from the Periodic Table.

At 1:00 and 3:00

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/full-spectrum-science-heat-temperature-7-23-2017

Cost: Included with museum admission.

==================================

Monday, 07/24/17 7:30 PM

Long Now Foundation
SF Jazz Center
201 Franklin St
San Francisco, CA 94102

Searching for Life in the Solar System

Planetary scientist Carolyn Porco leads the imaging science team on the Cassini mission presently in orbit around Saturn. An expert on planetary rings and the Saturnian moon, Enceladus, Porco has authored over one hundred scientific papers and also served as the imaging scientist of the Voyager mission to the outer solar system in the 01980s.

Website: http://longnow.org/seminars/02017/jul/24/searching-life-solar-system/

Cost: Free for Members

==================================

Tuesday, 07/25/17 7:30 PM

SLAC Public Lecture Series
2575 Sand Hill Road
Bldg 53, Panofsky Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Flares and Fireworks from Black Holes

Black holes are some of the most exotic and extreme objects in the universe. Though they sound like the stuff of science fiction, they are real and much more common than you might think. Every galaxy has a black hole lurking at its center! Also, these black holes are not actually black, because matter falling into black holes liberates energy that can power some of the brightest objects we see in the night sky. In this lecture you will find out exactly what a black hole is, how we can find them, and how they can flare intensely – giving rise to impressive firework displays and launching vast jets of plasma at close to the speed of light.
Speaker: Dan Wilkins, Stanford

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 07/25/17 7:30 PM

DNA Lounge
375 11th St
San Francisco, CA 94103

Astronomy on Tap San Francisco

Astronomy on Tap San Francisco is back for the summer, and it’s one you won’t want to miss! Comefor another night of talks from local scientists, Astronomy in the News, trivia and prizes! We’ll also be telling you everything you need to know for this summer’s upcoming solar eclipse, and handing out free eclipse glasses!

Website: https://astronomyontap.org/2017/06/astronomy-on-tap-san-francisco-july-25th/

==================================

Tuesday, 7/25/2017
7:15 PM – 9:15 PM

Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Avenue
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

General Meeting
Doors open at 6:45.

Speaker: Dr. Carolyn Porco, UCB

Topic: Looking for Life in the Solar System – the ELF Mission

==================================

Wednesday, 07/26/17
06:30 PM – 07:30 PM

Oakland Public Library
Bradley C. Walters Community Room
125 14th St
Oakland, CA 94612

August’s Eclipse of the Sun

On Monday, August 21, 2017, there will be an eclipse of the Sun visible throughout the U.S. and all of North America. People in a narrow path from Oregon to South Carolina will see a spectacular total eclipse, with the Moon briefly covering the Sun completely, and day turning into night. Everyone else (an estimated 500 million people, including all of us in the Bay Area) will see a partialeclipse, where the Moon covers a good part of the Sun. Special glasses or viewing techniques are needed to look at the Sun safely during a partial eclipse (sunglasses are NOT enough).

At the conclusion of the program, everyone attending will receive a pair of safe viewing glasses for observing the Sun. There will also be a book signing for When the Sun Goes Dark afterwards.

Speaker: Andrew Fraknoi, Foothill College

Website: http://oaklandlibrary.org/events/main-library/solar-eclipse-lecture-and-information

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 07/27/17
06:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Exploratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green St)
San Francisco, CA 94111

Full-Spectrum Science: Heat and Temperature
Join Exploratorium scientist Ron Hipschman for colorful explorations of the physical world.

What’s the difference between heat and temperature? We use the terms interchangeably, but they have precise meanings to physicists. How does your thermostat work and how does a Thermos® know to keep a hot thing hot and a cold thing cold? The mysteries will be revealed in this talk.

Since joining the Exploratorium in 1971, Ron Hipschman has worked as an exhibit developer, author, teacher, and webcast host. He currently works on the Exploratorium’s Environmental Initiative, implementing and maintaining a collection of environmental monitoring sensors and developing visualizations for the Fisher Bay Observatory Gallery’s super-resolution media wall. In addition to Full-Spectrum Science, Ron hosts the monthly After Dark series Everything Matters: Tales from the Periodic Table.

At 8:00

Learn more about the series, Full-Spectrum Science with Ron Hipschman.

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/after-dark/7-27-2017

Cost: $15 General; $10 Members; Free for Lab

==================================

Friday, 07/28/17
08:30 PM – 12:00 PM

Lick Observatory
7299 Mt. Hamilton Rd
Mt. Hamilton, CA 95140

Evenings with the Stars: Jason Prochaska – SOLD OUT

Our ‘Evenings with the Stars’ programs are held annually as part of our Summer Series. Each year we bring world-renowned astronomers to the summit of Mount Hamilton for a night with the “stars” you won’t forget!

Activities include:

• Astronomy talk by “star” scientists
• Viewing through the historic 36-inch Great Lick Refractor telescope
• Viewing through the 40-inch Nickel Reflector telescope
• Fascinating history talk about Lick Observatory
• After-hours gift shop access and light refreshments
• Astronomy discussions with amateur astronomers using small telescopes
Please note: Weather may restrict telescope viewings, but other activities will still take place.

Speaker: Dr. Jason Prochaska, UC Santa Cruz

Website: http://www.ucolick.org/summer/stars/program.html

Cost: $20

==================================

Friday, July 28, 2017
9:30 PM to 11:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr,
San Jose, CA

• Near the tennis courts
• Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 7/28/2017 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!
For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 7/28/2017 and Sat. 7/29/2017

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 7/28/2017 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 7/29/2017 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 07/29/17
02:00 PM – 03:30 PM

Central Park Library
Redwood Room
2635 Homestead Rd
Santa Clara, CA 95051

The Sky Event of the Decade: August’s Eclipse of the Sun

On Monday, August 21, 2017, there will be an eclipse of the Sun visible throughout the U.S. and all of North America. People in a narrow path from Oregon to South Carolina will see a spectacular total eclipse, with the Moon briefly covering the Sun completely, and day turning into night. Everyone else (an estimated 500 million people, including all of us in the Bay Area) will see a partial eclipse, where the Moon covers a good part of the Sun. Special glasses or viewing techniques are needed to look at the Sun safely during a partial eclipse (sunglasses are NOT enough).

Andrew Fraknoi, the author of a new children’s book on eclipses, When the Sun Goes Dark, will describe how eclipses work, why they are one of nature’s most spectacular sights, exactly when and where the eclipse of 2017 will be visible, and how to observe the eclipse and the Sun safely.

At the conclusion of the program, everyone attending will receive a pair of safe viewing glasses for observing the Sun. There will also be a book signing for When the Sun Goes Dark afterwards.

Website: http://santaclaraca.gov/Home/Components/Calendar/Event/54109/67

Cost: Free

Written by