Bay Astro – Events of Week of 09/25/2017 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Tuesday, 09/26/17
07:15 PM – 09:15 PM

Mount Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Ave
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

The Myths of Astronomy

The meeting starts at 7:15 and ends at 9:15. Our monthly meetings begin with a short “What’s Up” presented by one of our members, followed by a speaker.

This month’s speaker is Professor Thomas Targett, from Sonoma State University

This month’s What’s Up, by Paul Reid: VASIMR: Innovative Spacecraft Propulsion

Cost: free

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Thursday, 09/28/17
08:00 PM – 11:00 PM

City Star Parties – Parade Grounds at the Presidio
103 Montgomery St.
Main Post Lawn
San Francisco, CA 94129

City Star Party @ The Presidio

Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.
Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: http://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/event/san-francisco-city-star-party-37/?instance_id=1253

Cost: Free

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Fri. 9/29/2017 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!
For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 9/29/2017 and Sat. 9/30/2017

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri. 9/29/2017 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 9/30/2017 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Sat Sep 30, 2017
2:00 pm – 11:00 pm

Family Science & Astronomy Festival + Makerspace
College of San Mateo
1700 W Hillsdale Blvd, San Mateo, CA 94402
San Mateo, CA 94402

September 30th is Astronomy Day! CSM and the San Mateo County Astronomical Society will be celebrating this day with science, astronomy, and makerspace workshops along with planetarium shows! These events run from 2 pm to 6 pm and are open the public free of charge. All workshops are suited for the every age group, be sure bring the kids!
The events culminate in a key note lecture by Dr. Jeffrey Cuzzi, interdisciplinary scientist for rings and dust, Cassini Mission. The title of the Dr. Cuzzi talk is “Cassini: Thirteen years at Saturn”.
We end the evening by inviting the public to the CSM Observatory to enjoy the beauty of celecial bodies while listening to Jazz music.

Website: http://www.collegeofsanmateo.edu/calendar/events/index.php?com=detail&eID=20034

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Monday, 10/02/17 7:30 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Solar Spicules: Dynamic Jets that Power the Sun’s Atmosphere

At any moment, the Sun’s lower atmosphere is permeated by tens of millions of colossal jets known as spicules, measuring up to 8000 kilometers (5000 miles) in length and propelling plasma into the upper atmosphere at speeds on the order of 100 kilometers (60 miles) per second. Despite being observed for a century, their origin has been poorly understood. For the first time, thanks to a combination of computer simulations and observations by ground-based telescopes and spaceborne observatories, some of the mysteries of spicules are being peeled away.

Speaker: Dr. Juan Martinez-Sykora, Lockheed-Martin

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/solar-spicules-dynamic-jets-that-power-the-suns-atmosphere

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

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Tuesday, 10/03/17 7:30 PM

SLAC Public Lecture Series
2575 Sand Hill Road
Bldg 53, Panofsky Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Viewing the Beginning of Time from the Most Remote Places on Earth

Shortly after the birth of the universe, space was filled by a plasma that was literally red-hot. The light radiated by that plasma has traveled the vast emptiness of space for billions of years, with the expansion of the universe slowly stretching its waves until today it appears as microwave radiation. This is the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), a glow still visible in the night sky. This glow is almost uniform, but small variations from point to point hold information about the conditions of the universe 13.8 billion years ago. This lecture will introduce the CMB, present the sophisticated cameras we build to observe it, and describe the remote outposts of our planet where we deploy these cameras to take pictures of this faint radiation. As we image the CMB in finer and finer detail, we hope to improve our understanding of the beginning of the universe and perhaps of time itself.
Speaker: Zeeshan Ahmed, SLAC

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 10/05/17
07:00 PM – 09:30 PM

Astronomy Night
Campbell Hall
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Directly Imaging Planets Around Other Stars
Speaker: Gaspard Duchene, UC Berkeley

Cost: Free

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Friday, 10/06/17 7:00 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
College of San Mateo
Building 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Formation of Habitable Planets
Speaker: Dr. Monica Kress, San Jose State University

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/meetings.html

Cost: Free

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Fri. 10/06/2017 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!
For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 10/06/2017 and Sat. 10/07/2017
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 10/06/2017 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 10/07/2017 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 10/07/17
07:30 PM – 09:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

On Becoming a Spacefaring Society

If we ever hope to become a true spacefaring society, we must wean ourselves away from chemical rockets. This premise will be proven through an examination of Tsiolkovsky’s Rocket Equation, where it will become apparent that adding fuel achieves diminishing returns, but increasing exhaust gas velocity offers rapid transits to Mars, the outer planets, and eventually the nearby stars. There is an upper limit to the exhaust gas velocity of chemical rockets. To improve on this we must revisit nuclear thermal rockets, and eventually fusion rockets, and finally antimatter rockets. Each of these technologies is feasible although considerable engineering and infrastructure development remains to be done. This technological evolution will be presented in my series of hard SciFi novels in the Galactican Series. This lecture will be delivered at the high school physics level. Ejner will be offering for sale signed copies of each of his two SciFi novels, SpaceCorp and CisLuna. The price is $30 for both, or $15 each. (Retail price on Amazon is $36.75 plus shipping and taxes.)

Speaker: Ejner Fulsang, Author

Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/242235263/

Cost: Free

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