Bay Astro – Events of Week of 03/20/2017 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Tuesday, March 21 2017 – 12:00 pm, PDT

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
1065 La Avenida
Microsoft SVC Building One Galileo Auditorium
Mountain View, CA 94043

NASA’s search for habitable planets and life beyond the solar system
Gary H. Blackwood, NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program, JPL

Dr. Gary H. Blackwood earned his BS, MS and PHD in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering from MIT. He has been an employee at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA since 1988 and has worked on technology development for precision astronomical instruments and astrophysics missions including the Hubble Wide/Field Planetary Camera-2, the StarLight formation-flying interferometer, the Space Interferometry Mission and the Terrestrial Planet Finder. Since 2012 he has served as the Program Manager for the NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program, managed by JPL for the Astrophysics Division of the NASA Science Mission Directorate.

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Tuesday, 03/21/17
07:00 PM – 08:30 PM

Cubberley Community Theatre
4000 Middlefield Road

Palo Alto, CA 94303

Wonderfest: Hunting Asteroids

The dinosaurs (and 75% of all earthly species!) learned the hard way: asteroids eventually mean trouble – on a planetary scale. From the meteor that exploded over Chelyabinsk in 2013, to the asteroid/comet that caused a mass extinction 66 million years ago, space “debris” is important. Fortunately, a global team of dedicated astronomers – including Caltech’s Carrie Nugent – finds and tracks asteroids throughout the solar system. Come learn about the nature, origin, and global lethality of our solar system’s numerous mini-worlds.

Speaker: Dr. Carrie Nugent, Caltech

See weblink for Wonderfest discounts

Website: http://wonderfest.org/hunting-asteroids-mar-21/

Cost: $20 General, $12 Members, $7 Students

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Tuesday, 03/21/17 7:30 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Presidio Officer’s Club
50 Moraga Ave
San Francisco, CA 94129

Galileo’s Telescopes and Observations – The Great Inflection Point in the History of Science

In 1609, Galileo Galilei significantly improved the optical performance of the telescope and began a series of celestial observations that dramatically changed our understanding of the universe and our place in it.

He developed a new method for reliably comprehending phenomena in the world around us, and so correctly has been called the father of modern science. This talk will lay out the key developments in the history of science related to astronomy preceding Galileo, describe in detail what is known about the optics and construction of his telescopes, and then discuss his observations and how they radically changed the science of astronomy.

Alan Agrawal is a physician who specializes in the treatment of autoimmune diseases in the field of rheumatology. He is also an avid amateur astronomer and independent historian on the development of the telescope. He designs and builds telescopes and eyepieces, enjoys deep sky observing with his 0.6 meter telescope, is interested in the testing of optics and currently in the process of building an interferometer. He is an active member of the Antique Telescope Society and the Mount Diablo Astronomical Society, and just recently joined the San Francisco Amateur Astronomers. He has given previous talks on Galileo’s telescopes, the history of sky charts, and the life and work of Joseph von Fraunhofer.

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 03/23/17 8:00 PM

Exploratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

Full-Spectrum Science with Ron Hipschman: The Universe

We tend to think of “home” as the building in which we live, or the town or city where we reside. Voyage to the edge of the known universe, and gain some perspective on the tiny planet we call home. See some of the amazing ways the universe is structured, and learn how it’s evolved.

Part of After Dark

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/after-dark/3-23-2017

Cost: Free with After Dark Admission

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Fri. 3/24/2017 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!
For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 3/24/2017 and Sat. 3/25/2017

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri. 03/24/2017 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 03/25/2017 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Sunday, 03/26/17 8:00 PM

Exploratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

Full-Spectrum Science with Ron Hipschman: The Universe

We tend to think of “home” as the building in which we live, or the town or city where we reside. Voyage to the edge of the known universe, and gain some perspective on the tiny planet we call home. See some of the amazing ways the universe is structured, and learn how it’s evolved.

Part of After Dark

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/full-spectrum-science-universe-3-26-2017

Cost: Free with After Dark Admission

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Monday, March 27 2017 – 12:00 pm, PDT-Note change to Monday. Also the SETI talks will suspend while seeking a new venue as announced below.

SETI Institute Colloquium Series
1065 La Avenida
Microsoft SVC Building One Galileo Auditorium
Mountain View, CA 94043

Latest Exoplanet Results from NASA’s Kepler/K2 Mission
Ian Crossfield, UC Santa Cruz

The all-sky TESS mission will soon revolutionize our view of planets transiting the nearest, brightest stars to the Sun, just as the four-year survey by NASA’s Kepler mission transformed our understanding of exoplanet demographics. Using the repurposed Kepler spacecraft, the ongoing K2 mission provides a natural transition from Kepler to TESS in terms of sky coverage, survey duration, and intensity of ground-based follow-up observations. For the past three years I have led a large, multi-institutional team to discover, follow up, validate, and characterize hundreds of new candidates and planets using data from K2. I will highlight some of our key results from the first two years of K2 data, and will conclude with a discussion of the path forward to future exoplanet discovery and characterization.

Important Note: March 27 will be the final SETI Talk Weekly Colloquium at Microsoft’s Mountain View campus. The SETI Institute is grateful for the support this program has received from Microsoft, for hosting these events, to Adrian Brown for organizing them, and to Leonard Tramiel for his generous sponsorship of the program.

SETI Talks will return! We are currently identifying a new venue and will share all the details as soon as they are finalized. In the meantime, there will be a brief hiatus following the event on March 27.

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Tuesday, 3/28/2017
7:15 PM – 9:15 PM

Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Avenue

Walnut Creek, CA 94597

General Meeting
Doors open at 6:45.

Speaker: Nicole Duncan, UCB

Topic: Solar Flares

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Friday, March 31, 2017
8:30 PM to 10:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr,
San Jose, CA

• All telescopes will be set up on the sidewalk that is between the Tennis Courts and Parking Lot.
• Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

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Fri. 3/31/2017 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 3/31/2017 and Sat. 4/1/2017

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 03/31/2017 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 4/1/2017 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Monday, 04/03/17
07:30 PM – 09:00 PM

Benjamin Dean Astronomy Lectures
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

The Diversity of Alien Worlds

Over the past few decades, hundreds of new planetary systems have been discovered, many of which show remarkable diversity compared with our own Solar System. A key step towards characterizing these planets is the determination of which planets occupy the Habitable Zone (HZ) of their host stars. In this talk, Dr. Kane describes the properties of the HZ, the dependence on the stellar properties, and the current state of exoplanet detections in the HZ. Along the way, he will attempt to dispel some common misconceptions regarding the Habitable Zone. Finally, he will present several case studies of HZ Kepler planets, including new results from Kepler and the planet orbiting Proxima Centauri.

Speaker: Dr. Stephen Kane, San Francisco State Univ.

Website: http://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/the-diversity-of-alien-worlds

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members and Seniors

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