Lecture: 15 December “Water, Water Everywhere….” by Greg Delory, Sr. Fellow, UC Berkeley

15 December, Tuesday, 7:45 PM, Presidio Observation Post, Building 211

“Water, Water Everywhere – From the Earth, the Moon, Mars and Beyond”

by

Gregory Delory, Sr. Fellow, Space Sciences Lab, UC Berkeley, Principal Investigator, NASA Mars Instrument Development

Greg-Delory

Water, essential for life as we know it, is an important indicator of the conditions present on other planets and moons throughout recent history and in the distant past. The presence and state of water and other similar volatile compounds throughout our own solar system provides insight into its formation, and the origin of the life-sustaining environments that it supports. The fact that water is found in otherwise extreme environments on other planets and moons may indicate the presence of active, dynamic processes at work that serve to replenish this otherwise fragile, volatile resource. Water is also a potential resource that future human space missions can utilize in order to engage in the sustainable exploration of our solar system.

In this talk, Delory will discuss the significance of recent discoveries of water in the most unlikely of places – our own Moon – and what this means for our understanding of how both the Moon and our solar system have evolved over time. Mars represents the converse case – whereas it was no great surprise to find water there, it is likely that a significant amount of it was lost over time. The importance and value of observations from recent space missions in addressing these questions will be discussed, as we seek to understand more about our own origins as well as our future destinations beyond Earth.

Brief Bio

Dr. Greg Delory is a Senior Fellow in a joint appointment at the Space Sciences Laboratory and Center for Integrative Planetary Sciences at UC Berkeley. His main activities are focused on the development of experimental techniques for the exploration of space and planetary environments. He is a multi-disciplinary experimentalist whose research areas address a wide range of questions. He has also participated as Co-Investigator in numerous space flight missions throughout his career.

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