• 18 Oct 2021 2:00 PM | Scott Miller (Administrator)

    Tuesday, 10/19/21
    05:30 PM - 06:30 PM

    Berkeley Public Library

    Two Talks: Popping the Science Bubble - Livestream


    CSI: Supernova, the Death of a Star
    Stars live for millions upon millions of years in a (for the most part) calm and steady fashion. Yet, when a star’s life ends, it escalates to outshining its entire galaxy (a collection of trillions of stars) by many thousands of times in a fraction of a moment in a brilliant and cataclysmic event known as a supernova. These explosions can tell us valuable information about the star itself: how it lived, what it was like, or potentially how far away it is. As astronomers, we investigate these ‘crime scenes’ of the deaths of stars and put together evidence to recreate the story of the star.
    Speaker: Daniel Brethauer, UC Berkeley

    ==============

    Quantum chemistry in modern service to X-ray science
    Every day, we are faced with decisions. When meeting a few friends for morning coffee, you decide on the best route and flexibly make changes based on the current conditions. This ability comes, in part, from the hippocampus of the brain, a region linked to both memory and space. However, navigating your social network when you arrive is also thought to engage the hippocampus. In this talk, I will discuss exciting work exploring the hippocampus as the cartographer of our experiences, providing an internal organization of our knowledge about the world.

    Speaker: Eric Knudsen, Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute

    Website: https://poppingthesciencebubble.wordpress.com/about/

    Zoom: tinyurl.com/PtSBBerkeley

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/berkeleypubliclibrary

    Cost:  Free

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    Wednesday, 10/20/21
    07:00 PM - 08:30 PM

    SETI Institute

    Black Holes are Real. How Do They Shape Structure and Evolution in our Universe? - Livestream

    Fantastical though they may seem, black holes are real, not just science fiction or ideas from the imaginations of theorists. Scientists are now able to study black holes, in detail, throughout our Universe.

    Researchers are gaining different, complementary views of black holes using multiple techniques, but we are still a long way from putting a complete picture together. In April 2019, an international collaboration called the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) produced the first image of a black hole found in the heart of the nearby galaxy Messier 87. The LIGO gravitational wave detector has even been able to spot the ripples created in space itself when black holes collide.

    When gas falls into a black hole, it releases an enormous amount of energy. As strange as it seems, this means that black holes can give rise to some of the brightest objects in the known Universe, especially in the X-ray waveband. Observing the X-rays emitted as gas falls into a black hole gives us a close-up view of what’s happening just outside of the event horizon. Future space telescopes, such as the European Space Agency’s Athena mission, will reveal supermassive black holes in the early Universe and help us understand how black holes grow and helped shape our Universe.

    We invited two astrophysicists to discuss the state-of-the-art scientific investigations and instrumentation dedicated to understanding these most extreme phenomena in our Universe. Our guests will be Dr. Laura Brenneman, Deputy Associate Director for the High-Energy Astrophysics Division of the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, who pioneered the study of the rotation of black holes and is involved in the ATHENA mission, and Dr. Dan Wilkins, an astrophysicist in the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University. He led a team that recorded the first detection of radiation coming from behind a black hole"bent due to the warping of spacetime around the object.

    Moderated by Simon Steel, SETI Institute.

    Register at weblink to attend.

    Website: https://www.seti.org/event/seti-talks-black-holes-are-real-how-do-they-shape-structure-and-evolution-our-universe

    Register:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/seti-talks-black-holes-are-real-tickets-186999930827

    Cost:  Free

    ================================

    Wednesday, 10/20/21
    07:00 PM - 08:30 PM

    Silicon Valley Astronomy Lecture Series

    The Last Stargazers -- Behind the Scenes in Astronomy - Livestream

    A bird that mimicked a black hole. The astronomer that discovered microwave ovens. A telescope that got shot. The science of astronomy is filled with true stories (and tall tales) of the adventures and misadventures that accompany our exploration of the universe. Dr. Levesque will take us on a behind-the-scenes tour of life as a professional astronomer. We'll learn about some of the most powerful telescopes in the world and their cutting-edge discoveries, meet the people behind the science, and explore the crucial role of human curiosity and innovation in the past, present, and future of scientific discovery.

    Emily Levesque is an astronomy professor at the University of Washington and the author of the critically-acclaimed popular science book, The Last Stargazers

    View the lecture here live, or watch it afterwards.

    Website: https://www.youtube.com/user/SVAstronomyLectures

    Cost:  Free

    ================================

    Wednesday, 10/20/21  7:00 PM

    San Francisco Amateur Astronomers

    Living with a Star: the Sun, Space Weather, and Our Place in the Stellar Neighborhood - Livestream

    As humanity expands its presence on the Moon and Mars, we venture outside of our Earth’s protective magnetic bubble and into the dynamic space weather system driven by the sun. On Earth, we feel the effects of space weather during extreme solar storms, which can produce intense x-ray flares and massive explosions that deform our planet’s strong magnetic field, generating the aurora. Much as Earth weather influences the voyages of earthbound explorers, interplanetary space weather is an important consideration for these space-borne explorers. Several currently operating and future NASA and ESA missions seek to uncover persisting mysteries about our sun, including the source of supersonic plasma flows we call the solar wind, and what conditions lead to massive solar eruptions associated with intense x-ray flares. Lastly, what we learn about how our sun locally can be extended to inform what we see at other distant stars.

    Speaker: Phyllis Whittlesey, UC Berkeley

    See weblink for Zoom, Facebook, and YouTube links

    Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/live-streamed-lectures/

    Connect starting at 6:30pm on Wednesday, October 20th by clicking this Zoom meeting link: https://zoom.us/j/95830904603?pwd=UDNKdm16US9wK1EremdJeGptdjNNdz09

    SFAA YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChuBJGp_iJYZ11q_ayA-q3A

    SFAA Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/152754481404310

    Cost:  Free

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    Thursday, 10/21/21
    06:30 PM - 07:30 PM

    UC Riverside

    Avenging the Dinosaurs: Radar Observations for Planetary Defense - Livestream

    On a nearly daily basis, Earth is impacted by dust, meteoroids, and even small asteroids, which typically burn up in the atmosphere producing what we call “shooting stars”. We also know that Earth has been hit by much larger and more devastating objects. In fact, a large impact is thought to have led to the extinction of the dinosaurs. Luckily, unlike the ancient terrible lizards, we have a space program and can work to defend Earth against such events. To do so, we need to know where hazardous objects are today and where they’ll be in the future, and we must also characterize them well enough so we can put together impact mitigation plans. Radar observations, such as those that were conducted at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, are invaluable for such measurements. Join Dr. Ed Rivera-Valentín to learn how radar and other observations can help keep us safe!

    Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astronomy-lecture-radar-observations-for-planetary-defense-registration-169395367103

    Cost:  Free
    ================================

    Saturday, 10/23/21
    09:00 AM - 05:00 PM

    SkeptiCal 2021 - Livestream

    In its 11th year, SkeptiCal 2021 brings stimulating and entertaining speakers to a nation-wide audience of science fans, critical thinkers, and, in the words of Carl Sagan, questioners of “extraordinary claims”. Join us for two stimulating days of speakers, interviews, and discussions. And - test your wits on a round of Skeptical trivia, and try your hand at SkeptiCal’s popular Skepardy! game.

    Register at weblink.  Schedule of speakers here.

    Talks include:

    • Real vs Unfounded Concerns about COVID-19 Vaccines. Speaker: Paul Offit
    • The Fiction of Memory. Speaker: Elizabeth Loftus, UC Irvine
    • Fake doctor. Real harm. Confessions of a former naturopathic doctor. Speaker: Britt Marie Hermes, former naturopathic doctor.
    • A conversation with Maria Konnikova
    • Big Bad Pharma, the FDA, and the reasons why a new Alzheimer’s drug should never have been approved. Speaker: Rachel Dunlop, Brain Chemistry Labs
    • Déjà Voodoo: Or How to Start Your Own Cult. Speaker: Ross Blocher, Podcaster
    • Fighting Pseudoscience at Scale: How to Take on the Juggernauts of Woo. Speaker: Thomas Westbrook, Holy Koolaid LLC
    Registrants will receive connection information prior to the event.

    Other Dates For This Event:
    • Saturday, 10/23/21
    • Sunday, 10/24/21

    Website: https://www.skepticalcon.com

    Cost:  $20

    ================================

    Saturday, 10/23/21
    09:00 PM - 10:30 PM\

    Chabot Space and Science Center

    Virtual Telescope Viewing - Livestream

    Join our resident astronomers on Facebook Live every Saturday evening live from Chabot’s Observation deck!

    Each week, our astronomers will guide us through spectacular night sky viewing through Nellie, Chabot‘s most powerful telescope. Weather permitting we will be able to view objects live through the telescopes and our astronomers will be available for an open forum for all of your most pressing astronomy questions.

    Other Dates For This Event:
    • Saturday, 10/23/21
    • Saturday, 10/30/21

    Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/virtual-telescope-viewing/2021-10-23/

    YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCarFXs-04xmdHW_PVc7LWRg

    Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/events/4443135732423850/?event_time_id=4443137535757003

    Cost:  Free

    ================================

    Sunday, 10/24/21
    09:00 AM - 05:00 PM

    SkeptCal

    SkeptiCal 2021 - Livestream

    In its 11th year, SkeptiCal 2021 brings stimulating and entertaining speakers to a nation-wide audience of science fans, critical thinkers, and, in the words of Carl Sagan, questioners of “extraordinary claims”. Join us for two stimulating days of speakers, interviews, and discussions.  Test your wits on a round of Skeptical trivia, and try your hand at SkeptiCal’s popular Skepardy! game.

    Register at weblink.  Schedule of speakers here.

    Talks include:

    • Real vs Unfounded Concerns about COVID-19 Vaccines. Speaker: Paul Offit
    • The Fiction of Memory. Speaker: Elizabeth Loftus, UC Irvine
    • Fake doctor. Real harm. Confessions of a former naturopathic doctor. Speaker: Britt Marie Hermes, former naturopathic doctor.
    • A conversation with Maria Konnikova
    • Big Bad Pharma, the FDA, and the reasons why a new Alzheimer’s drug should never have been approved. Speaker: Rachel Dunlop, Brain Chemistry Labs
    • Déjà Voodoo: Or How to Start Your Own Cult. Speaker: Ross Blocher, Podcaster
    • Fighting Pseudoscience at Scale: How to Take on the Juggernauts of Woo. Speaker: Thomas Westbrook, Holy Koolaid LLC
    Registrants will receive connection information prior to the event.

    Other Dates For This Event:
    • Saturday, 10/23/21
    • Sunday, 10/24/21

    Website: https://www.skepticalcon.com

    Cost:  $20

    ================================

    Monday, 10/25/21
    03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

    SLAC Colloquium

    A 'cool' route to unveil the Higgs boson’s secrets - Livestream

    The Higgs boson was discovered in 2012 by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the world’s most powerful particle collider, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, Switzerland. This particle plays a unique role in fundamental physics. It gives all of the known elementary particles, including itself, their masses. While we now have a strong evidence that the Higgs field is indeed the unique source of mass for the known elementary particles, the next step is to search for new interactions that could also explain why the Higgs field has the properties required by the Standard Model of particle physics.  We have no clear roadmap to this new theory but the Higgs boson plays a crucial role in this quest. This talk highlights the current experimental results of Higgs boson couplings to other particles and its self-coupling at the LHC and perspectives at future colliders. The goal of a next-generation collider is to carry out precision measurements to per-cent level of the Higgs boson properties that are not accessible at the LHC. The exploitation of the complementarity between LHC and future colliders will be the key to understanding fundamentally the Higgs boson. The Cool Copper Collider (C^3) is a new concept for linear e+e- collider that could provide a rapid route to precision Higgs physics with a compact footprint.

    Speaker: Caterina Vernieri, SLAC

    Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/cool-route-unveil-the-higgs-boson’s-secrets

    https://stanford.zoom.us/j/91261717830?pwd=em1Fa29KWk5wSEpYdlJscFhaaEpEZz09

    Or Telephone:
        Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):         US: +1 650 724 9799  or +1 833 302 1536 (Toll Free)

    Webinar ID: 912 6171 7830

    Passcode: 332902

    Cost:  Free

    ================================

    Monday, 10/25/21  4:00 PM

    What Physicists Do - Sonoma State University

    Testing Einstein with Lasers and the Moon - Livestream

    Speaker: Dr. James Battat

    Website: https://phys-astro.sonoma.edu/public-events/what-physicists-do

    Zoom link:  https://sonomastate.zoom.us/j/82812013600#success

    Cost:  Free

    ================================

    Tuesday, 10/26/21   3:30 PM

    Natural Science Annex
    UC Santa Cruz
    Room 101
    Santa Cruz, CA 95064

    Whole Earth Seminar - Wind-blown dunes in the solar system

    Speaker: Andrew Gunn, Stanford

    Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/whole-earth-seminars/fall-2021.html

    Cost:  Free

    ================================

    Saturday, 10/30/21
    09:00 PM - 10:30 PM

    Chabot Space and Science Center

    Virtual Telescope Viewing - Livestream


    Join our resident astronomers on Facebook Live every Saturday evening live from Chabot’s Observation deck!

    Each week, our astronomers will guide us through spectacular night sky viewing through Nellie, Chabot‘s most powerful telescope. Weather permitting we will be able to view objects live through the telescopes and our astronomers will be available for an open forum for all of your most pressing astronomy questions.

    Other Dates For This Event:

    • Saturday, 10/30/21

    Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/virtual-telescope-viewing/2021-10-30/

    YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCarFXs-04xmdHW_PVc7LWRg

    Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/4443135732423850/?event_time_id=4443137535757003

    Cost:  Free

    ================================

    Monday, 11/01/21  4:00 PM

    What Physicists Do - Sonoma State University

    Building Traversable Wormholes (In Theory) - Livestream


    Speaker: Dr. Brianna Grado - White

    Website: https://phys-astro.sonoma.edu/public-events/what-physicists-do

    Zoom:  https://sonomastate.zoom.us/j/82812013600#success

    Cost:  Free

  • 04 Oct 2021 8:36 PM | Scott Miller (Administrator)


    On Wednesday, Oct 20th, 2021 at 7 pm (PDT), Dr. Emily Levesque of the University of Washington will give a free, illustrated, non-technical lecture on:  

    The Last Stargazers: Behind the Scenes in Astronomy”                                                                 
    On line at YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/SVAstronomyLectures  

              [if you go to this address the evening of the talk you will see and be able to participate in the live event; we will also make a recording] 

    The talk is part of the Silicon Valley Astronomy Lecture Series (through Foothill College), now in its 22nd year. 

    A bird that mimicked a black hole. The astronomer that discovered microwave ovens. A telescope that got shot. The science of astronomy is filled with true stories (and tall tales) of the adventures and misadventures that accompany our exploration of the universe. Dr. Levesque will take us on a behind-the-scenes tour of life as a professional astronomer. We'll learn about some of the most powerful telescopes in the world and their cutting-edge discoveries, meet the people behind the science, and explore the crucial role of human curiosity and innovation in the past, present, and future of scientific discovery. 

    Emily Levesque is an astronomy professor at the University of Washington and the author of the critically-acclaimed popular science book, The Last Stargazers (published in 2020 by Sourcebooks)Her work explores how the most massive stars in the universe evolve and die. She has observed for upwards of fifty nights on many of the planet’s largest telescopes and flown over the Antarctic stratosphere in an experimental aircraft for her research. Her academic accolades include the 2014 Annie Jump Cannon Award, a 2017 Alfred P. Sloan fellowship, and the 2020 Newton Lacy Pierce Prize.  

    The lecture is co-sponsored by: 

    * The Foothill College Science, Tech, Engineering & Math Division 

    * The SETI Institute 

    * The Astronomical Society of the Pacific 

    * The University of California Observatories (including Lick Observatory). 

    Past lectures in the series can also be found on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/SVAstronomyLectures    

    The series is also beginning to be available as a podcast and can be found on many of the popular podcast services.  Its home is at: https://www.buzzsprout.com/1805595 

    Recent podcasts include Nobel Laureate John Mather on the work that will be done by the Webb Space Telescope, Dr. Tom Shutt on new experiments hunting for dark matter, and Dr. Elinor Gates on how the pandemics of 1918 and 2020 affected the Lick Observatory. 
    __________________________________________

    REMINDER:

    Explore the Universe  in a Fun, Non-credit Class On-line with Andrew Fraknoi for People Over 50

    In this richly illustrated, non-technical Zoom class, Andrew Fraknoi will introduce the realms of the universe and the intriguing ideas about planets, stars, and galaxies that modern astronomy has revealed.  For a more detailed outline of the six-week course, which goes from Oct. 11 to Nov. 15, see: https://www.campusce.net/sfsu/course/course.aspx?C=794&pc=94&mc=&sc= 

    The class is offered through the San Francisco State’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI). You must sign up for membership in OLLI to take the class (it’s a modest fee.) 

    Andrew Fraknoi has taught introductory astronomy at colleges and universities for more than four decades.  He was the California Professor of the Year in 2007 and has received many other awards for his career explaining astronomy in everyday language (including an asteroid being named after him). He is the lead author of a free, on-line astronomy textbook for beginners that has been used by more than half a million students.  His fourth science fiction story, based on good astronomy, was published last month. 

    To register for this class, you first need to join OLLI and create a user name and password: https://www.campusce.net/sfsu/account/signin.aspx  

    Then go here to sign up for a membership: https://www.campusce.net/sfsu/course/course.aspx?C=465&pc=14&mc=&sc=   

    After you have signed up and paid for an account, you can register for classes. 

    1. Visit the Fall Catalog page at: https://www.campusce.net/sfsu/category/category.aspx?C=&S=94  
    2. Select the “sign in” box at the upper right corner of the page and sign in, using your new user name and password. 
    3. Select Andrew Fraknoi’s class, Exploring the Universe: An Introduction to Astronomy. 
    4. Add the class to your cart. 
    5. Continue to purchase your registration for the class.   

    If you have any other questions about membership, course packages, or course registration, please email olli@sfsu.edu

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