Bay Astro – Events of Week of 02/04/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Monday, 02/04/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Measuring the Hubble Constant with Gravitational Waves

The first detection of binary neutron star merger by Advanced LIGO-Virgo and the discovery of the optical counterpart allowed for the first independent measurement of Hubble constant with gravitational waves. In this talk, I will summarize latest cosmological measurements with gravitational waves, and discuss the future aspects of them. I will then talk about the potential challenges and how we improve the measurements.
Speaker: Hsin-Yu Chen, Harvard

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/measuring-hubble-constant-gravitational-waves

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 02/05/19
12:00 PM – 01:00 PM

Braun (Geology) Corner (Bldg 320), Rm 220
450 Serra Mall
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Exploring planet formation and the early Earth using a new generation of paleomagnetic tools
Speaker: Roger Fu, Harvard

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/exploring-planet-formation-and-early-earth-using-new-generation-paleomagnetic-tools

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 02/05/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The Sound of Darkness?

Assuming the standard cosmological model, different data sets lead to inconsistent values of the Hubble constant. In this talk I will reformulate this discrepancy in terms of the sound horizon – the comoving distance traveled by sound waves from the beginning until recombination of the primordial plasma. The sound horizon can be inferred in a relatively model-independent manner using classic distance ladder techniques with BAO observations at the highest rung. It can also be inferred by assumption of the standard cosmological model and use of a variety of data sets, most notably CMB power spectra. I will argue that a model change that can reconcile these somewhat discrepant inferences has to be important in the 1 to 1.5 decades of scale factor growth immediately preceding recombination. I will bring up a number of model adjustments and the challenges they face, and conclude that among the listed options, an additional dark component appears to be the most viable.

Speaker: Lloyd Knox, UC Davis

Website: http://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 02/06/19
01:30 PM – 03:00 PM

Building 048 Room 224
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
2575 Sand Hill Road
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Evidence the 3.5 keV line is not from dark matter decay
Speaker: Nichoas Rodd, UC Berkeley

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/evidence-35-kev-line-not-dark-matter-decay

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 02/07/19 6:30 PM

New Bohemia Brewing Co
1030 41st Ave
Santa Cruz, CA 95062

Astronomy on Tap Santa Cruz #11 – What’s Up at Lick Observatory?

Lick Observatory, above San Jose, has a long history of being at the forefront of science and technology, starting with the most advanced telescope in the world at the time in 1888. Dr. Elinor Gates will describe some of the current research being done at Lick Observatory, ranging from discovering supernova explosions to searching for intelligent life elsewhere in the universe. These discoveries are made possible using state of the art instruments and cameras. One of the most sophisticated instruments is the Shane Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system. Dr. Claire Max, director of the University of California Observatories, will detail how adaptive optics “untwinkles the stars” to improve our view of the universe with large ground-based telescopes and enable new discoveries.

Website: https://astronomyontap.org/2019/01/aot-santa-cruz-11-whats-up-at-lick-observatory-thursday-february-7th-2019-new-bohemia-brewing-co/

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 02/07/19
08:00 PM – 09:30 PM

Blue River Technology
605 W California Ave
Training Room
Sunnyvale, CA 94086

Wonderfest: How Quantum Physics Works, But Not Why: Perspectives from Atom Interferometers

Despite its universal scope (every little thing) and precision (better than 10 parts per billion), quantum physics retains profound mysteries. What is really going on down there in the heart of matter?! Atom interferometers are instruments that rely on the quantum “wave nature” of matter for measurements of fundamental constants AND for use as super-sensitive detectors of acceleration, rotation, and gravity. This talk will explore the importance of atom interferometers in probing the quantum realm.

Our speaker, Eric Copenhaver, is a physicist at both UC Berkeley and Stanford. He is also a Wonderfest “Science Envoy,” trained in – and reveling in – crystal-clear science communication.

Website: http://wonderfest.org/how-quantum-physics-works-but-not-why/

Cost: Free

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Friday, 02/08/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Observing cadence of the LSST facility: the Dark Energy Science Collaboration perspective

Speaker: Eli Rykoff

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/observing-cadence-lsst-facility-dark-energy-science-collaboration-perspective

Cost: Free

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Friday, February 8, 2019
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr
San Jose, CA

Near the tennis courts

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

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Fri. 02/08/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 02/08/2019 and Sat. 02/09/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 02/08/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 02/09/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Sat. 02/09/2019
Sunset: 5: 41 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive
San Carlos, CA

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset.. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

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Saturday, 02/09/19
06:30 PM – 08:30 PM

College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Jazz Under the Stars

Come peer through our telescopes and see craters on the Moon, the visible planets, star clusters, and more while we listen to CSM’s very own KCSM Jazz 91 FM. Dress warmly. Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5. Directions are available on the Maps, Directions & Parking page.

Website: http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/astronomy/jazz.asp

Cost: Free

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Monday, 02/11/19
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
2575 Sand Hill Rd, Building 51
Kavli Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

LHC accelerator: from design to operation and future plans (High Luminosity LHC project and FCC)

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a 27 km circumference hadron collider, built at CERN to explore the energy frontier of particle physics. Approved in 1994 after 10 years of prototyping of the main accelerator components, it was commissioned and began operation for data taking in 2010. The design and construction of the LHC presented many design, engineering and logistical challenges which involved pushing a number of technologies well beyond their level at the time.

Since the start-up of the machine, there has been two successful physics runs with an impressive amount of data delivered to the LHC experiments at 7 and 8 TeV centre of mass energy for the Run 1 (2010-2012) and at 13 TeV for the Run 2 (2015-2018).

A full exploitation of the LHC including an upgrade of the accelerator and detectors (High Luminosity LHC) is defined for the next two decades. An intensive program of R&D was launched to achieve the High Luminosity challenges: superconducting high field magnets, superconducting RF compact cavities, collimators, superconducting lines, radiation hard power converters …

CERN is also initiating an exploratory study for a future long-term project post-LHC centred on a next-generation circular collider with a circumference of 80 to 100 kilometres (FCC: Future Circular Colliders).

The colloquium will recall the main LHC technical developments. Then the R&D program and the plans for the full exploitation of the LHC will be discussed and finally the FCC study will be presented.

Speaker: Frederick Bordry, CERN

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/lhc-accelerator-design-operation-and-future-plans-high-luminosity-lhc-project-and-fcc

Cost: Free

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Monday, 02/11/19 7:30 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

New Approaches to Looking for E.T.

For six decades, a tiny group of scientists has probed the cosmos for evidence of aliens. Is this an endless quest, or could we soon learn of other beings in the nearby universe? We’ll discuss the latest efforts to uncover the extraterrestrials, as well as some disturbing ideas that could change the way we hunt for cosmic company. Also, what happens if we do detect someone or something out there? Would that radically change our own society, or merely be an interesting story for a week or two?

Speaker: Seth Shostak, SETI

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/new-approaches-to-looking-for-et

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

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Wednesday, 02/13/19
07:00 PM – 08:00 PM

SETI Institute: SETI Talks
SRI International
333 Ravenswood Ave
Menlo Park, CA 94025

The Future of NASA Space Telescopes – What to Look for in the Next Generation

What should we expect from the next generation of space telescopes? What key scientific questions will they help answer? Do we have the technology we need to operate them in 20-30 years?

To address these issues, NASA selected four large space mission concepts to study and consider as possible future Large Strategic Science Missions. Of the NASA astrophysics division missions, these tend to be the most expensive, but also have the greatest capacity.

Three of those space telescopes got the attention of the SETI Institute because of their potential to answer the question, “Are We Alone?”

• The Origins Space Telescope (Origins) is a large cooled infrared space telescope with higher sensitivity and better angular resolution than any prior observatory accessing similar wavelengths. Among its many science objectives covering the first stars to life, Origins could help scientists understand the abundance and availability of water for habitable planets, and could look forbiosignatures on potentially habitable worlds transiting low-mass stars.

• The Large UV Optical Infrared Surveyor (or LUVOIR) is a general-purpose observatory; its key science goal is to characterize a wide range of exoplanets, including those that might be habitable and orbiting a range of stellar types.

• The Habitable Exoplanet Imaging Mission (HabEx) is a space telescope, optimized to search for and image Earth-sized exoplanets in the habitable zones around sun-like stars, where liquid water might exist. HabEx would also have a suite of general astrophysics science capabilities.
Each of these concepts has pros and cons, as well as other technological, cost and risk challenges. These mission concepts will be described in detail in their final study reports, which will be delivered to the National Academy of Sciences for the Astro 2020 Decadal Survey later this year. It is still unknown whether the Decadal Survey will prioritize none, one or even several of these concepts, but the several hundred scientists and engineers involved in these mission concept studies for the past three years are confident that we are now capable of building these telescopes, and that the science that they can deliver will be compelling and change again our view of the cosmos, just as the Hubble Space Telescope has done for the past 3 decades.

We invited three scientists directly involved in each one of the three teams above to discuss these exciting future mission projects. During this SETI Talk, they will describe their projects, and tell us more about the challenges and the processes that could make these missions a reality:

• Prof. Courtney Dressing, astronomer and member of the LUVOIR Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) whose research aims to detect and characterize planetary systems orbiting nearby stars.

• Dr. Kimberly Ennico Smith, a NASA research astrophysicist, who is multidisciplinary in her approach to space instruments, telescopes and mission concepts. She is a member of the STDT of OST.

• Prof. Scott Gaudi, astronomer and community chair of the HabEx STDT, . Gaudi bridges the gap between theory and observations, with extensive experience in leadership roles and consensus-building, as well as experience with several exoplanet detection methods and exoplanet surveys.

Website: https://seti.org/event/future-nasa-space-telescopes-what-look-next-generation

Cost: Free

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Friday, 02/15/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

LSST White Paper on Dark Matter
Discussion led by Arka Banerjee

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/lsst-white-paper-dark-matter

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 02/15/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 02/15/2019 and Sat. 02/16/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 02/15/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 02/16/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 02/16/19
07:00 PM – 10:00 PM

City Star Parties – Parade Grounds at the Presidio
103 Montgomery St.
Main Post Lawn
San Francisco, CA 94129

San Francisco City Star Party @ Parade Grounds in the Presidio of San Francisco
Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.
Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/events/cat_ids~55/%22%3e%20City%20Star%20Parties/

Cost: Free

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