Bay Astro – Events of Week of 02/18/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Tuesday, 02/19/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Machine learning dark matter halo formation
Speaker: Luisa Lucie-Smith, University College, London

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/machine-learning-dark-matter-halo-formation

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 02/19/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Ultra-low energy calibration of xenon-based dark matter detectors

Xenon-based experiments have demonstrated world leading sensitivity in searches for medium-to-high mass WIMP dark matter interactions. Recent developments suggest that these experiments may also be sensitive to low mass WIMPs, which requires xenon detectors to be calibrated at very low energies. In this talk, I will discuss a series of efforts made by the LLNL noble liquid group to measure the ionization yield of xenon nuclear recoils that may be produced by WIMP interactions. Using a low-energy pulsed neutron beam and a compact xenon time projection chamber, we measured neutron-induced xenon recoils between 0.3keV and 6 keV, and studied the yield dependence on the drift electric field between 200V/cm and 6.3kV/cm. The impact of this result on current and future dark matter searches will be discussed.

Speaker: Jingke Xu, Lawrence Livermore National Labs

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/ultra-low-energy-calibration-xenon-based-dark-matter-detectors

Cost: Free

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Wednesday February 20th. 7:30pm

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum Theater
199 Museum Way SF

“Understanding Solar Magnetic Activity”

Willam P. Abbett, Space Sciences Lab, UC Berkeley

Understanding solar activity — and in particular, how magnetic flux and energy emerges from the Sun’s turbulent interior (where it is generated) into the solar corona — is of fundamental importance to a number of unsolved problems in the field of solar and heliospheric physics. The Sun’s dynamic magnetic field plays an integral role in almost all aspects of observed activity, and is the source of energy for large-scale eruptive events such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and flares. These events are the principle drivers of the most energetic and disruptive space weather events we experience here at earth, and understanding the physics of their initiation is crucial if we are to better predict and mitigate the effects of solar storms. Observations of the Sun provide a unique opportunity to study these events, and to explore the fundamental physics of magnetized plasmas in conditions that simply cannot be reproduced in terrestrial laboratories.

With the wealth of current and historical data from ground and space-based remote-sensing instruments (and soon, in-situ measurements from NASA’s Parker Solar Probe mission!) it is evident that there are distinct, long-term patterns to the Sun’s activity. Yet observed variations of these global patterns are incredibly complex and interconnected, and occur over a vast range of spatial and temporal scales. Here, I will present a brief historical overview of our understanding of magnetic activity on the Sun, describe recent efforts to incorporate data from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory into multi-scale models of solar activity, and summarize recent progress toward addressing some of the long-standing, unsolved problems in the field of solar physics.

Bio
Dr. William P. Abbett is a Research Physicist and Senior Fellow at the Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL) at the University of California, at Berkeley. He has a variety of research interests in the field of astrophysics, including the formation and evolution of magnetic fields in the convective interior of the Sun and other stars; the dynamic connection between magnetic fields existing below the visible surface of the Sun and those observed in the solar corona; the physics of magnetically driven eruptions in the solar corona; and the transport of radiation in the optically-thick layers of stellar atmospheres during flares.

Dr. Abbett developed one of the first parallel radiative-magnetohydrodynamic codes capable of modeling the physically-distinct layers of the Sun’s upper convection zone, photosphere, chromoshere, transition region, and low corona within a single computational domain. With the solar group at SSL, he is currently developing techniques to assimilate remote sensing observations into numerical models of the solar atmosphere in order to improve the predictive capability of physics-based models of solar activity.
_

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Thursday, 02/21/19
02:00 PM – 03:00 PM

Bookshop West Portal
80 W Portal Ave
San Francisco, CA 94127

Wonderfest: ‘Out There’

NASA’s recent Kepler Mission gave us good reason to believe that the Milky Way Galaxy is home to billions of habitable worlds. Of course, “habitable” does not mean inhabited, far less intelligent. In this Wonderfest presentation, science writer Michael Wall will discuss the big questions that permeate humankind’s search for extraterrestrial intelligence: What are we looking for? How are we looking? How would the world respond to confirmed contact? Dr. Wall will also discuss the long view of human space travel our effort to get out there, in the flesh.

Website: http://wonderfest.org/out-there/

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 02/21/19 4:00 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Pixels to physics: the promise and challenges of survey cosmology
Speaker: Hiranya Peiris, UCL

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/i/astronomy-colloquium

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 02/21/19
06:30 PM – 08:30 PM

LASER Leonardo Art Science Evening Rendezvous
San Jose State University
Campus Village 2 Multipurpose Room
San Jose, CA 95122

February LASER Event – San Jose
Our speakers for February 21st, 2019 include –

Dr. David Deamer
Biologist and Research Professor of Biomolecular Engineering
University of California, Santa Cruz
https://www.soe.ucsc.edu/people/deamer

Stardust, Cells and the Origin of Life

Description: The paradigm is that life began in salty sea water, in the ocean, perhaps in hydrothermal vents. But there is an alternative supported by experimental evidence, that life began in fresh water hot springs undergoing cycles of wetting and drying. Under these conditions, protocells can assemble from organic compounds delivered by meteoritic infall 4 billion years ago, when life first emerged on our planet.

Yolande Harris
Artist
Research Associate
University of California, Santa Cruz
http://yolandeharris.net

Melt Me Into The Ocean: learning from underwater sound

Description: How do we engage our sonic intelligence to expand our understanding and empathy towards remote environments such as the ocean? ‘Melt Me Into The Ocean’ is a series of artworks that use deep ocean recordings in site-specific installations and sound walks. The technological ability to retrieve sounds from ocean depths and listen to them in land-bound environments, raises questions as to how our sense of place might expand to integrate the submarine world into the presence of our imagination. Sound is considered as engaging a sense of relatedness that allows participants to imaginatively dive beneath the visual surface of the ocean, encouraging a sense of presence and connectedness to arise from these encounters.

Dr. Resa Kelly
Professor, Chemistry
San José State University
http://www.sjsu.edu/people/resa.kelly/

Animations for Exploring Students’ Understanding of the Particulate Nature of Reactions

Description: This presentation focuses on a qualitative study performed to examine how first semester general chemistry students made sense of contrasting atomic level animations to develop their understanding of a precipitation reaction event. Findings from interviews, card sorting and model constructing exercises will be shared to examine how the animation treatment affected students’ conceptual understanding in a clinical setting and when embedded in a General Chemistry class. Our latest animation designs, informed by recent studies, will be shown.

Victoria Scott
Artist
San Francisco

Artwork & Projects

The Energy Body in VR

Description: Reality is modeled in our heads and imaginations; developing thoughts, projected feelings, intuitions about unseen forces, and visualizations of space (in the past and future). No machine can create empathy, but is it possible to open ourselves to spiritual connection, emotional intimacy, and healing of body trauma using visualizations, immersive color and spatialized sound in the virtual world to create safe containers for difficult to confront feelings?

According to energy healers, our external physical bodies, are invisibly surrounded by many differently shaped fields and auras, each with distinct colors, forms and properties. For Laser, I will present two new VR projects which give viewers abstracted visualizations of these emotional energy systems; Field, an experimental, interactive art environment, and Cloud Breath, a breathing meditation app.

Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/320762411901977/

Cost: Free

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Friday, 02/22/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

How computers see earth: machine learning at a global scale
Speaker: Kyle Story, Descartes Labs

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/how-computers-see-earth-machine-learning-global-scale

Cost: Free

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Friday, February 22, 2019
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr · San Jose, CA

How to find us
Near the tennis courts

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

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Fri. 02/22/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 02/22/2019 and Sat. 02/23/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri. 02/22/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 02/23/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 02/23/19 7:30 PM

East Bay Astronomical Society
Chabot Space and Science Center
Galileo Rm.
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

The Moon Mess

For several decades after the last of the Apollo missions, scientists have thought that the question of the origin of the Moon was largely settled. The Moon was created about 4½ billion years ago, when a Mars-size body and the proto-Earth – both with atmospheres and, likely, surface oceans – crashed into each other.

While the giant-impact hypothesis successfully explains most of the peculiarities of the Moon, such as its geochemistry, lack of a metallic core, or its late formation relative to other objects in the solar system, over the years more and more evidence has shown that we still don’t know all the details. Isotopic ratios of certain elements – which can trace the origin of bodies in the solar system – have revealed that the Earth and the Moon are virtually made from the same stuff. Recently, researchers have also found more water than expected in the composition on lunar samples returned to Earth by the Apollo missions.

In this talk we will review the origin of the giant impact theory, address some of these open questions and take a look at what scientists worldwide are doing to find a suitable explanation.

Speaker: Javier Barbuzano, “Sky and Telescope”

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

Cost: Free

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Monday, 02/25/19
03:00 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
2575 Sand Hill Rd, Building 51
Kavli Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

What might be learned today from Einstein’s interface of physics and philosophy?

Early in his career as a theoretical physicist, Einstein fashioned an identifiable working philosophy of physical theory that, in broad essentials, never changed. It is a “philosophy of principles” and in crucial respects, it is responsible for his greatest triumph, the relativistic theory of gravitation, as well as his greatest failure, an unwillingness to accept quantum mechanics on grounds that the wave function provides only an incomplete description of individual atomic systems. Is this philosophy of more than historical or biographical interest today? I shall argue that it is, and that greater familiarity with the broad contours of such a philosophy might prove a salutary addition to contemporary methodological debates around inflationary cosmology and string theory.

Speaker: Thomas Ryckman, Stanford

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/what-might-be-learned-today-einsteins-interface-physics-and-philosophy

Cost: Free

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Monday, 02/25/19 6:00 PM

Hopmonk Tavern
224 Vintage Way
Novato, CA 94945

Wonderfest: Can ALL Stars Host Habitable Planets?

NASA’s recent Kepler Mission discovered that most stars in our Milky Way Galaxy host planets. Among those planets, Earth-size worlds are remarkably common. But the conditions for planets around their host stars vary with both distance from the star and mass of the star. Astronomer Gibor Basri will explore the issues surrounding habitability – the ability to support life – for planets and space around ALL types of stars.

Website: http://wonderfest.org/hosting-habitable-planets/

Cost: Free

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Monday, 02/25/19
07:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Club 21
2111 Franklin St
Oakland, CA 94612

Nerd Night East Bay: Exercise Recovery, the Albany Bulb, SETI
• Good to Go: The Strange Science of Exercise Recovery (Christie Aschwanden, author)
• History of the Albany Bulb: Why a Former Dump is the Best Park Ever (Susan Moffat, UC Berkeley)
• Is Anybody Out There (Dan Werthimer, SETI)

Website: https://eastbay.nerdnite.com

Cost: $8 Advance, $10 at door

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Tuesday, 2/26/2019 7:00 PM

Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Avenue
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Speaker: Professor David Messerschmitt, UCB
Topic: Interstellar Communications

Website: https://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/event-view.cfm?Event_ID=95185

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Wednesday, 02/27/19 7:00 PM

Silicon Valley Astronomy Lecture Series
Foothill College
Smithwick Theater
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

The Worlds Under Our Feet: Caves from Earth to Mars and Beyond

New exploration indicates that caves may be more common on rocky and icy worlds in our Solar System than we have thought in the past. Caves below the Earth show us a very different planet than the familiar one we experience on the surface. Each dark cave system has its own micro-organisms and distinctive mineral and chemical properties. So we infer that caves on Mars and on some of the icy moons of the outer planets will also have characteristics quite different from their surfaces. We will take a tour of the some of the most spectacular caves under the Earth and the unusual life-forms they harbor, and consider how the lessons they teach us can be applied to the exploration of the Solar System.

Speaker: Dr. Penelope Boston, Nasa Astrobiology Institute

Website: https://www.foothill.edu/astronomy/

Cost: Free ($3 parking)

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Friday, 03/01/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Two KIPAC Tea Talks
Observing the First Stars

Speaker: Tilman Hartwig, University of Tokyo

Black hole-galaxy scaling relations: clues to the physics behind quiescence

Speaker: Bryan Terrazas, Univ. of Michigan

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/hartwig-observing-first-stars-terrazas-black-hole-galaxy-scaling-relations-clues-physics

Cost: Free

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Friday, 03/01/19 8:00 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Near Earth Asteroid Hazards, Research and Space Missions

Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), are a population of objects on orbit around the Sun that cross or come near that of Earth. They represent remnants of material from the early solar system that never accredited into planets. NEAs are of special interest to us because of the special risks some of them may present to earth from collision. Join us in learning more about Near Earth Asteroids and related space missions from Dr. Michael Busch. Dr Busch will review the near-Earth population, as well as efforts to discover and characterize NEAs from the ground, and will also discuss past, current, and future missions to near-Earth asteroids. These include missions by NASA, ESA, JAXA, the Chinese National Space Agency, and other groups.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/meetings.html

Cost: Free

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Fri. 03/01/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 03/01/2019 and Sat. 03/02/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 03/01/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 03/02/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 03/02/19
09:00 AM – 04:00 PM

ExplOratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

6th NGSS STEM Conference Investigating Everyday Phenomena: Exploring 3-Dimensional Learning through NGSS

Science is all around us, and the California Next Generation Science Standards (CA NGSS) can help your students understand it. Join us as we engage in activities for your science classroom (grades 3-12) incorporating the three dimensions of NGSS. Spend a day at the Exploratorium investigating the science of everyday phenomena.

Presented by the Exploratorium’s Teacher Institute and the Institute for Inquiry, this full-day conference features a keynote address and your choice of three hands-on workshops.

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/education/ngss-stem/2019

Cost: $50

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