Bay Astro – Events of Week of 03/18/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Monday, 03/18/19 12:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The Evolution of Volatile Molecules During Planet Formation
Theoretical Astrophysics Seminar

Speaker: Kamber Schwarz, Univ. of Arizona

Website:http://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/

Cost: Free

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Monday, 03/18/19
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
2575 Sand Hill Rd, Building 51
Kavli Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Artificial Intelligence Meets Basic Research: The SETI Institute and NASA’s Frontier Development Lab

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning have emerged as essential tools for the deployment of applied technologies such as self-driving cars, security, robotics and even consumer electronics. The fundamental physical and biological sciences, however, have not fully embraced AI/ML to leverage these tools for what they can offer in advanced data analytics, modeling and forecasting and anomaly detection. In partnership with NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Headquarters and private industry, the SETI Institute is host to a graduate-level summer research accelerator with the goal to change that paradigm and demonstrate the efficacy of AI/ML applied to basic research. Now in its fourth year, the Frontier Development Lab (FDL) has demonstrated breakthrough results in NASA research priorities ranging from planetary defense and space resources, to exoplanets, astrobiology and heliophysics. In 2019, new programs are anticipated addressing space medicine and cellular biology. FDL is also demonstrating the power of public/private partnership where companies such as Google, Intel, IBM, Lockheed and NVIDIA, are active partners, providing human, technological and financial resources. SETI Institute CEO, Bill Diamond will describe the FDL program, including key results and discuss opportunities for expanded research domains.

Speaker: Bill Diamond, SETI

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/all-events

Cost: Free

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Monday, 03/18/19
04:15 PM – 05:15 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

When a Symmetry Breaks

What is common among a magnet, a flounder, a rack of laundry, your heart on the left of your body, and the Higgs boson? The concept of spontaneous symmetry breaking is ubiquitous among many natural phenomena. I’ll describe the basic concept and its applications. In particular, the original concepts from Anderson, Nambu, Goldstone, and Higgs do not quite work in many systems that include a magnet on your fridge. I generalize the concept so that it is applicable to all known natural phenomena around us. I will also touch on recent related ideas on dark matter.

Speaker: Hitoshi Murayama, UC Berkeley

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20190318/when-a-symmetry-breaks

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 03/19/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Developing a Standard Model of Galaxies

In this presentation Peter Capak will argue that a combination of large galaxy surveys and the latest machine learning techniques are allowing astrophysicists to develop a robust statistical model of the extra-galactic universe. If optimally constructed, this model would encapsulate all available information on the likelihood of observing a given type of galaxy as well as its distribution in space and cosmic epoch. The initial motivation for developing elements of this model was improved constraints on dark energy and dark matter. He will show how these models have significantly improved photometric redshifts for weak lensing and can be used for Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) spectroscopic target selection. He will then demonstrate how the standard statistical models also contain most of the available information on the formation and evolution of galaxies. He will conclude with examples of how he is using his models to optimally design observation with facilities in high demand such as ALMA and the future JWST.
Speaker: Peter Capak, Caltech

Website: http://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 03/20/19
07:00 PM – 09:00 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114

Another Pale Blue Dot: Inside the SETI Institute’s Search for Exoplanets

Dr. Marchis presents Another Pale Blue Dot: Inside the SETI Institute’s Search for Exoplanets, a talk on the search for planets beyond our solar system and referred to as exoplanets. In only two decades, scientists have gone from the mere speculation about exoplanets to being able to observe them through a variety of methods. Dr. Marchis will discuss new and sophisticated projects designed to provide images of these exoplanets. Future instruments could soon deliver an image of a cousin of Earth, or another Pale Blue Dot, a planet similar to our own. The talk will be followed by a demonstration of the Unistellar eVscope, an innovative robotic telescope developed in partnership with the SETI Institute.

Speaker: Frank Marchis, SETI

Website:https://seti.org/event/randall-museum-lectures-another-pale-blue-dot-inside-seti-institutes-search-exoplanets

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 03/20/19
06:30 PM – 09:00 PM

Michaels at Shoreline
2960 N Shoreline Blvd
Mountain View, CA 94043

Artificial Intelligence for Safety Critical Applications in Aerospace

Starting in the 1970s, decades of effort went into building human-designed rules for providing automatic maneuver guidance to pilots to avoid mid-air collisions. The resulting system was later mandated worldwide on all large aircraft and significantly improved the safety of the airspace. Recent work has investigated the feasibility of using computational techniques to help derive optimized decision logic that better handles various sources of uncertainty and balances competing system objectives. This approach has resulted in a system called Airborne Collision Avoidance System (ACAS) X that significantly reduces the risk of mid-air collision while also reducing the alert rate, and it was recently accepted as an international standard. Using ACAS X as a case study, this talk will discuss lessons learned about building trust in advanced decision-making systems in aerospace. This talk will also outline research challenges in facilitating greater levels of automation into safety critical systems and the ongoing work at the Stanford for AI Safety.

Speaker: Mykel Kochenderfer, Stanford

Website: https://aiaa-sf.org/event/dinner-meeting-with-mykel-kochenderfer/

Cost: $15 – $35

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Thursday, 03/21/19 4:00 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The Search for Life beyond the Solar System
Speaker: Victoria Meadows, Univ. of Washington

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/i/astronomy-colloquium

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 03/21/19
05:45 PM – 07:00 PM

The Octopus Literary Salon
2101 Webster St
Oakland, CA 94612

Neutrinos – The REAL God Particle

Join us to learn from Dr. Javier Caravaca about the super duper tiny particles called neutrinos. Trillions of neutrinos sail straight through our bodies every day without ever bumping into the matter that makes up our bodies. In fact, electrons are about 500,000 times more massive than neutrinos. But what happens when we force neutrinos to bump into stuff? What can we learn about matter, dark matter, and the universe?

Website: https://clear-project.org

Cost: Free

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Friday, 03/22/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Recent highlights from HAWC

Speaker: Henrike Fleischhack, Michigan Tech

The Cygnus Star Forming Region with HAWC

Speaker: Binita Hona, Michigan Tech

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/fleischhack-recent-highlights-hawc-hona-cygnus-star-forming-region-hawc

Cost: Free

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Fri. 03/22/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 03/22/2019 and Sat. 03/23/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri. 03/22/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 03/23/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 03/23/19
10:00 AM – 03:00 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

Women in STEAM in Space

A whole day all about women who are doing incredible work in STEAM careers in space! Join us for hands-on activities, a panel discussion, and a chance to engage with engineers, biologists, artists, and people in other fields that surprisingly link with space missions. It takes more than just rocket scientists to be part of space missions. Bring your questions and curiosity.

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/women-in-steam-in-space

Cost: Free with admission

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Saturday, 03/23/19
07:30 PM – 09:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

Tales from the Stratosphere

Sometimes the sequel is even better than the original. SOFIA, Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, offers teachers the opportunity to experience first hand what it is like to be part of a NASA mission through its Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors program. Hear about a local Airborne Ambassador’s multiple trips to the stratosphere and how each trip impacted her teaching in unique ways.

Speaker: Marita Beard

Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/257516125/

Cost: Free

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Sunday, 03/24/19
01:00 PM – 04:00 PM

ExplOratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

Full-Spectrum Science: The Universe

We tend to think of “home” as the building in which we live, or the town or city where we reside. Voyage to the edge of the known universe, and gain some perspective on the tiny planet we call home. See some of the amazing ways the universe is structured, and learn how it’s evolved.

Talks at 1:00 and 3:00

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/full-spectrum-science-ron-hipschman-universe-3-24-2019

Cost: Free with Admission to the Exploratorium

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Tuesday, 3/26/2019 7:15 PM

Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Avenue
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Speaker: Dr. Pete Worden, Breakthrough Initiative

Topic: Starshot – sending a micro spacecraft to Alpha Centauri

Website: https://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/event-view.cfm?Event_ID=95186

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Fri. 03/29/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 03/29/2019 and Sat. 03/30/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 03/23/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 03/30/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Monday, 04/01/19 7:30 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Building a Galaxy-Scale Gravitational Wave Detector

Galaxies grew in the early universe by merging with each other, and as they coalesced, the supermassive black holes at their hearts merged with each other, too. Einstein’s theory of general relativity predicts the existence of gravitational waves – the stretching and squeezing of space itself – as such black hole mergers take place. We have recently detected these ripples from the mergers of stellar black holes, but the mergers of supermassive black holes produce ripples with much longer wavelengths, requiring a galaxy-scale detector to observe them.

Dr. Chatterjee will describe how we are using rapidly spinning neutron stars as clocks to build such a long-wavelength gravitational wave detector, how the searches for these neutron stars have turned up fast radio bursts, and how these mysterious radio flashes from distant galaxies are teaching us more about the universe we live in.

Speaker: Dr. Shami Chatterjee, Cornel Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/building-a-galaxy-scale-gravitational-wave-detector

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

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