Bay Astro – Events of Week of 03/04/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Monday, 03/04/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Simulations for Cluster-Based Cosmology

Observations of galaxy clusters have thus far supported the standard model of cosmology and provided constraints on non-standard models including evolving models of dark energy and modifications of gravity. The statistical power of galaxy clusters is at a golden age, where forthcoming observations will provide data for tens of thousands of galaxy clusters. However, our ability to further use clusters as probes is now limited by how well we measure cluster masses and quantify systematic effects in how we detect and measure galaxy clusters. To calibrate observations and understand underlying astrophysical processes, we need simulations that capture both those relevant astrophysical processes and the diversity within a large sample of galaxy clusters. I will discuss ongoing modeling efforts and software infrastructure development that allows us to best leverage the data in upcoming surveys.
Speaker: Camille Avestruz, Univ. of Chicago

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/simulations-cluster-based-cosmology

Cost: Free

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Monday, 03/04/19
12:00 PM – 01:00 PM

Physics and Astrophysics Building
Room 102/103
Stanford University
452 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Finding the next Einstein in Africa: the African Institute of Mathematical Sciences

The African Institute of Mathematical Sciences (AIMS) was founded in 2008 by Neil Turok with a simple yet profoundly ambitious goal: to find the next Einstein in Africa. More broadly speaking, the AIMS organization works to improve the overall level of math and scientific education throughout the African continent while building a sustainable pan-African academic network that will enable future generations of scientists to succeed. In this talk, I will introduce you to this unique academic institution through the lens of my own experiences, having been involved with AIMS in a variety of roles in South Africa, Rwanda, and most recently Ghana, and how an investment of oneself in this endeavor has amazing potential for the broader scientific community throughout the 21st century.

Speaker: Samuel Meehan, University of Washington

Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/samuel-meehan-finding-next-einstein-africa-african-institute-mathematical-sciences

Cost: Free

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Monday, 03/04/19
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
2575 Sand Hill Rd, Building 51
Kavli Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Light-matter interactions at extreme intensities: boiling the quantum vacuum at SLAC and beyond

At the so-called critical or Schwinger intensity the quantum vacuum becomes unstable with respect to electron-positron pair production. This strong-field regime of quantum electrodynamics (QED) plays an important role in extreme astrophysical plasmas, in upcoming laboratory high-energy density laser-plasma experiments, and at the interaction point of future high-luminosity lepton colliders. At SLAC’s FACET-II the Lorentz boost of 10GeV electrons will be exploited to reach the QED critical field in the electron rest frame.

This experiment facilitates the first observation of strong-field vacuum breakdown and related phenomena. In the foreseeable future electromagnetic fields far beyond the QED critical one will become achievable, allowing us to study light-matter interactions in a regime where all existing theoretical calculations break down and qualitatively novel phenomena are conjectured to occur.

Speaker: Sebastian Meuren, Princeton Univ.

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/light-matter-interactions-extreme-intensities-boiling-the-quantum-vacuum-slac-and-beyond

Cost: Free

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Monday, 03/04/19
07:30 PM – 09:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

OSIRIS-REx: NASA’s First Asteroid Sample Return Mission

NASA’s OSIRIS-REx mission is the first U.S. mission to retrieve a pristine sample of an asteroid and return it to Earth for further study. The mission’s target is Bennu, a carbon-rich near-Earth asteroid that is also potentially hazardous to Earth.

Asteroids are the leftover debris from the Solar System’s formation process that began more than 4.5 billion years ago. Studying Bennu will revolutionize our understanding of the early Solar System and teach us much about planetary history and the origin of life. The OSIRIS-REx mission will expand our knowledge of the hazards and resources in near-Earth space and will serve as a precursor to future asteroid missions.

OSIRIS-REx was launched on September 8, 2016 and arrived at Bennu on December 3, 2018. The window for sample acquisition opens on July 4, 2020. The sample will return to Earth on September 24, 2023. DellaGiustina will discuss early results of the mission since OSIRIS-REx’s arrival at the asteroid in late 2018.

Speaker: Daniella DellaGiustina, NASA

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/osiris-rex-nasa’s-first-asteroid-sample-return-mission

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

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Tuesday, 03/05/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Weak lensing masses and scaling relations for 100 clusters
Speaker: Ricardo Herbonnet, Stony Brook Univ

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/weak-lensing-masses-and-scaling-relations-100-clusters

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 03/05/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Simulations for Cluster-Based Cosmology

Observations of galaxy clusters have thus far supported the standard model of cosmology and provided constraints on non-standard models including evolving models of dark energy and modifications of gravity. The statistical power of galaxy clusters is at a golden age, where forthcoming observations will provide data for tens of thousands of galaxy clusters. However, our ability to further use clusters as probes is now limited by how well we measure cluster masses and quantify systematic effects in how we detect and measure galaxy clusters. To calibrate observations and understand underlying astrophysical processes, we need simulations that capture both those relevant astrophysical processes and the diversity within a large sample of galaxy clusters. I will discuss ongoing modeling efforts and software infrastructure development that allows us to best leverage the data in upcoming surveys.

Speaker: Camille Avestruz, Univ. of Chicago

Website: http://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 03/05/19
04:30 PM – 05:30 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 201
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Pixels to Physics: The Promise and Challenges of Survey Cosmology

Prof. Hiranya Peiris of the University College London and Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Stockholm will give the Applied Physics/Physics colloquium

Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/pixels-physics-promise-and-challenges-survey-cosmology

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 03/07/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Near-Field Cosmology and the Lowest-Mass Galaxies

Galaxies less massive than the Small Magellanic Cloud (10^8 Msun) have become increasingly relevant to a broad range of astrophysics from cosmic reionization to deciphering the nature of dark matter. Yet, they are simply too faint to be directly detected at any appreciable redshift, compromising our ability to place them into a cosmological context. In this talk, I will describe how observations of resolved stellar populations in Local Group galaxies provide unique insight into the lowest-mass galaxies in the Universe, and comment on the role next-generation facilities can play in linking low-mass galaxies near and far.

Speaker: Daniel Weisz, UC Berkeley

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/near-field-cosmology-and-lowest-mass-galaxies

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 03/07/19 4:00 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Studying Distant Galaxies with Innovative Astronomical Instrumentation
Speaker: Shelley Wright, UC San Diego

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/i/astronomy-colloquium

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 03/07/19 6:30 PM

New Bohemia Brewing Co
1030 41st Ave
Santa Cruz, CA 95062

Astronomy on Tap Santa Cruz – Death in the Universe

The night sky might seem peaceful but there are many things simmering under the calm facade. Come to Astronomy on Tap this month to hear Dr. Jeffrey Silverman discuss some of thew ays the Universe is trying to kill off humanity. From killer asteroids to exploding stars, The Universe is a dangerous place for us humans stuck here on this damp rock known as Earth. The Universe is also a dangerous place for galaxies themselves. Ph.D. student Viraj Pandya will discuss “red and dead” galaxies that are unable to form new stars. He will describe the astrophysical processes that cause galaxies to die from galactic cannibalism and galactic-scale warming and sterilization.

Website: https://astronomyontap.org/2019/02/aot-santa-cruz-12-death-in-the-universe-thursday-march-7th-2019-new-bohemia-brewing-co/

Cost: Free

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Friday March 8th, 2019 at 7:30pm

PENINSULA ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY
MONTHLY MEETING AND FREE TALK
NEW VENUE – Los Altos Public Library
13 S. San Antonio Road, Los Altos, CA 94022

“WHY and HOW we went to the Moon”

by Gordon Myers of IBM (ret.) – member of the Apollo

Mission Control Center Support Team.

Website: http://www.pastro.org/dnn/

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Fri. 03/08/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 03/08/2019 and Sat. 03/09/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri. 03/08/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 03/09/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Sat. 03/09/2019
Sunset: 6:10 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive
San Carlos, CA

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset.. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

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Monday, 03/11/19
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
2575 Sand Hill Rd, Building 51
Kavli Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Reconstruction of pioneering physics experiments: Importance and lessons learned

Reproducibility is a growing issue in modern science – situations with high impact results in, e.g., social sciences, medicine and even biology and chemistry is often described as a crisis. Physics stands out as arguably the most reproducible discipline due to very high and universally applied standards. Reconstruction of pioneering physics experiments of the Enlightenment helps us to understand the development of “repeatable” Nature-philosophy. I will overview several modern-day experimental replications of the early days in physics and astronomy breakthroughs, present in detail the reconstruction of the 1761 discovery of Venus’s atmosphere in 2012, and discuss other opportunities for replication of famous experiments.

Speaker: Vladimir Shiltsev, Fermilab

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/reconstruction-pioneering-physics-experiments-importance-and-lessons-learned

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 03/13/19
07:00 PM – 08:00 PM

SETI Institute: SETI Talks
SRI International
333 Ravenswood Ave
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Exploring Ultima Thule: humanity’s next frontier

NASA’s New Horizons made history when it flew by Kuiper Belt object 2014 MU69, nicknamed ‘Ultima Thule’ on New Year’s Day of this year. Today, even though only 10% of the scientific data that the spacecraft collected has been sent to Earth, New Horizons has provided an amazing glimpse into the primordial solar system and revealed that Ultima Thule is the first contact binary object ever observed “in the wild,” where it formed, and in a largely unmodified state since its birth. High resolution images and the first comprehensive compositional spectroscopy data are now in-hand with the science team and many more scientific results will no doubt soon be forthcoming.

To discuss the key results of this successful flyby and the future of the mission, we invited Alan Stern, planetary scientist at Southwest Research Institute and the Principal Investigator of NASA’s New Horizons mission who will join us remotely via video-conferencing. Two Senior Research Scientists from our own SETI Institute who are part of the mission will participate in this discussion as well. Mark Showalter is a Fellow of the Institute who led the New Horizons risk assessment team before the flyby, and Ross Beyer, also a member of the New Horizons Geology and Geophysics team, who is helping to understand the 3D shape of MU69.

Website: https://seti.org/event/exploring-ultima-thule-humanitys-next-frontier

Cost: Free

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Friday, 03/15/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

LSST dark matter probes
Speaker: Ethan Nadler

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/lsst-dark-matter-probes

Cost: Free

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Friday, 03/15/19
06:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

Lectures & Lasers – Space in your Face!: Food in Space

Space in Your Face! is a variety show combining science and art to yield a highly immersive and engaging event. Hosted by astrobiologist Julia DeMarines. Lecture is at 7:00

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/lectures-lasers-3

Cost: $15

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Friday, 03/15/19 7:00 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers
1893 N. Vasco Rd
Unitarian Universalist Church
Livermore, CA 94551

How to make your own telescope mirror

Speaker: Richard Ozer

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

Cost: Free

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Friday, March 15, 2019
8:15 PM to 10:15 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
In Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr
San Jose, CA
Near the tennis courts

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 03/15/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 03/15/2019 and Sat. 03/16/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 03/15/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 03/16/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 03/16/19 11:00 AM

Genetics and Plant Biology Building
UC Berkeley
Room 100
Berkeley, CA 94720

Are red dwarf planets habitable?

Much recent news about exoplanets has concerned the discovery of earth-sized planets in the “habitable zone” of “red dwarf” stars. This is partly because such planets are more easily found around small stars, and partly because most stars are red dwarfs. Can planets in the habitable zone around a red dwarf could actually harbor earth-like life? Until recently most astronomers would have said “no” but this is changing. Professor Basri will explain why and talk about recent discoveries.

Speaker: Gibor Basri, UC Berkeley

Website: http://scienceatcal.berkeley.edu/lecture-are-red-dwarf-planets-habitable/

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 03/16/19
07:00 PM – 10:00 PM

City Star Parties – Point Lobos Parking Lot
El Camino Del Mar
San Francisco, CA 94121

San Francisco City Star Party @ Point Lobos, San Francisco, CA

Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.
Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/events/cat_ids~55/%22%3e%20City%20Star%20Parties/

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 03/16/19
08:00 PM – 10:00 PM

College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Jazz Under the Stars

Come peer through our telescopes and see craters on the Moon, the visible planets, star clusters, and more while we listen to CSM’s very own KCSM Jazz 91 FM. Dress warmly. Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5. Directions are available on the Maps, Directions & Parking page.

Website: http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/astronomy/jazz.asp

Cost: Free

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