Bay Astro – Events of Week of 04/01/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Monday, 04/01/19
12:10 PM – 01:00 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Circulation in Irradiated Stars and Giant Planets
Speaker: Adam Jermyn, UC Santa Barbara

Website: http://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/01/19
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
2575 Sand Hill Rd, Building 51
Kavli Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

CMB-S4: a next-generation search for inflation, relic particles, and neutrino mass using the Cosmic Microwave Background

Shortly after the birth of the Universe, space was filled with glowing red-hot plasma. As the universe expanded and cooled over the next 13.8 billion years, the glow of that plasma redshifted to longer wavelengths and is observed today by our telescopes as the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Spatial variations of CMB intensity and polarization provide a record of conditions in the early universe, possibly encoding signatures from cosmic inflation and unique traces of relic particles. Additionally, the CMB ‘backlights’ large-scale structure and picks up the influence of all matter, including neutrinos, on its way to us, in a measurable effect called CMB lensing.

CMB-S4 is a next-generation ground-based CMB experiment with sufficient planned sensitivity to cross critical science thresholds in the above-mentioned areas and the potential to make discoveries. CMB-S4 will map over 40% of the Southern sky from Chile and Antarctica starting in the late 2020s. It will complement DES, DESI and LSST in aiding our understanding of cosmic acceleration, and it will complement the long-baseline and beta-endpoint neutrino programs, as well as direct and indirect dark matter searches. CMB-S4 will be made possibly by continuing increases in the sensitivity of ground-based CMB imaging instrumentation over the past few decades, as well as advancement of our understanding and mitigation of systematic errors. Putting together CMB-S4 will take the combined effort of a significant fraction of the international CMB community, as well as support and participation from the US cosmology and HEP communities at large.

Speaker: Zeeshan Ahmed, SLAC

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/cmb-s4-next-generation-search-for-inflation-relic-particles-and-neutrino-mass-using-the

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/01/19
04:15 PM – 05:15 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

New Insights into the Cosmic Growth of Supermassive Black Holes

Using a “wedding cake” combination of multi-wavelength X-ray+infrared+optical surveys, we measure the growth of supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies over the ~12 billion years. Most actively growing black holes (“Active Galactic Nuclei” or AGN) are heavily obscured and thus look like inactive galaxies in optical surveys, so our census has effectively quadrupled the amount of accretion, and thus the amount of energy deposited in AGN host galaxies. However, contrary to leading models, our data suggest that for only a minority of galaxies does merger-triggered AGN “feedback” cause rapid quenching of star formation.

Speaker: Meg Urry, Yale Univ.

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20190401/new-insights-into-the-cosmic-growth-of-supermassive-black-holes

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/01/19 7:30 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Building a Galaxy-Scale Gravitational Wave Detector

Galaxies grew in the early universe by merging with each other, and as they coalesced, the supermassive black holes at their hearts merged with each other, too. Einstein’s theory of general relativity predicts the existence of gravitational waves – the stretching and squeezing of space itself – as such black hole mergers take place. We have recently detected these ripples from the mergers of stellar black holes, but the mergers of supermassive black holes produce ripples with much longer wavelengths, requiring a galaxy-scale detector to observe them.

Dr. Chatterjee will describe how we are using rapidly spinning neutron stars as clocks to build such a long-wavelength gravitational wave detector, how the searches for these neutron stars have turned up fast radio bursts, and how these mysterious radio flashes from distant galaxies are teaching us more about the universe we live in.

Speaker: Dr. Shami Chatterjee, Cornel Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/building-a-galaxy-scale-gravitational-wave-detector

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

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Tuesday, 04/02/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Cosmological applications of the kSZ effect

We show how kSZ tomography measures a bispectrum containing a cosmological power spectrum of the velocity field and an astrophysical power spectrum of the electron density. While these are degenerate up to an overall amplitude (the “galaxy optical depth”), scale-dependent effects on large scales are much better constrained by the inclusion of kSZ on top of galaxy clustering while assuming nothing about the optical depth of galaxy clusters. This allows for factors of >2x improvement on the amplitude of local primordial non-gaussianity fNL with the absolute constraint from Simons Observatory + LSST crossing the theoretically interesting threshold of sigma(fNL) < 1. Next, we discuss ways of measuring the amplitude of the growth rate by breaking the optical depth degeneracy using the dispersion measures of fast radio bursts (FRBs). Finally, we discuss calibration of baryonic feedback in weak lensing measurements using kSZ measurements of the electron density profile. Speaker: Mathew Madhavacheril, Princeton Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html Cost: Free ================================== Wednesday, 04/03/19 07:30 PM - 08:30 PM Marin Science Seminar 320 Nova Albion Way Terra Linda High School Rm 207 San Rafael, CA 94903 Myths of Astronomy Marin Science Seminar Speaker: Thomas Targett, Sonoma State Univ. Website: http://marinscienceseminar.com/calendar/ Cost: Free ================================== Thursday, 04/04/19 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium Physics and Astrophysics Building Room 102/103 452 Lomita Mall Stanford, CA 94305 Exploring the Mysterious Origins of Super-Earths and Mini-Neptunes Nearly a decade has passed since the discovery that planets with sizes intermediate between that of the Earth and Neptune (“super-Earths” or “mini-Neptunes”, depending on their densities) dominate the observed population of close-in exoplanets. These planets have no solar system analogue, yet 30% of Sun-like stars appear to have at least one (and often more) interior to Mercury’s orbit. Did these planets form in situ, or did they migrate inward from a more distant formation location? Either way, the implications for our understanding of planet formation are bound to be significant. In my talk I will describe current efforts to address this question by characterizing the bulk densities and compositions of these planets and searching for outer gas giant companions. Speaker: Heather Knutson, Caltech Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/exploring-mysterious-origins-super-earths-and-mini-neptunes Cost: Free ================================== Thursday, 04/04/19 4:00 PM LeConte Hall, Rm 1 UC Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720 Protoplanets and Protoplanetary Disks Speaker: Josh Eisner, Arizona Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/i/astronomy-colloquium Cost: Free ================================== Thursday, 04/04/19 06:00 PM - 10:00 PM ExplOratorium Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street) San Francisco, CA 94111 After Dark: Throwback Thursday We’re celebrating the Exploratorium’s 50th birthday, and you’re invited! At After Dark, we’re throwing it back to 1969, musing on the cultural environment from which the museum rose, and considering how that time period resonantes with the past and maybe impacts the future. From the first person on the moon to the first communication by ARPANET, the events, inventions, and cultural shifts of 1969 remain essential in our lives 50 years later. Come see how they might carry us on to the next 50 years. Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/after-dark-april-4-2019 Cost: $19.95 General, $14.95 Daytime Members ================================== Thursday, 04/04/19 07:30 PM - 10:00 PM Astronomy Night Campbell Hall UC Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720 Astro Night: Demystifying Black Holes Speaker: Fatima Abdurrahman, UC Berkeley Stargazing after the lecture, 8:30 pm - 10:00pm Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/i/astro-night Cost: Free ================================== Friday, 04/05/19 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) Building 51 3rd Floor Conference room Menlo Park, CA 94025 Metadetection Methods for Cosmic Shear Speaker: Matt Becker, Argonne National lab Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/metadetection-methods-cosmic-shear Cost: Free ================================== Saturday, 04/06/19 7:00 PM Fujitsu Planetarium at De Anza College 21250 Stevens Creek Blvd (by parking lot E) Cupertino, CA 95014 Explore Live! - Dark Skies Worldwide The De Anza College Planetarium will present “Explore Live!” - a live astronomy series featuring presentations by our professional planetarium staff. This is the first of two presentations on this date. Website: http://www.deanza.edu/planetarium/#astroshows Cost: $9 ================================== Fri. 04/05/2019 7PM Telescope Makers Workshop Chabot Space and Science Center 10000 Skyline Boulevard Oakland, CA 94619-2450 Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope! For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914. ================================== Fri. 04/05/2019 and Sat. 04/06/2019 Chabot Space and Science Center 10000 Skyline Boulevard Oakland, CA 94619-2450 (510) 336-7300 EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/ Free Telescope Viewing Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action! Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission. 12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting) ================================== Fri. 04/05/2019 9PM Foothill College 12345 El Monte Rd Los Altos Hills, CA 94022 Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky. Admission is free. Parking is $3 Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued. Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe! ================================== Sat. 04/06/2019 10AM Foothill College 12345 El Monte Rd Los Altos Hills, CA 94022 Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes. Admission is free. Parking is $3 Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued. ================================== Sat. 04/06/2019 Sunset: 7:35 PM San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society Public Star Parties Crestview Park 1000 Crestview Drive San Carlos, CA SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies. If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope. Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset... In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice. Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos. ================================== Saturday, 04/06/19 7:00 PM Fujitsu Planetarium at De Anza College 21250 Stevens Creek Blvd (by parking lot E) Cupertino, CA 95014 Explore Live! - Dark Skies Worldwide The De Anza College Planetarium will present “Explore Live!” - a live astronomy series featuring presentations by our professional planetarium staff. This is the first of two presentations on this date. Website: http://www.deanza.edu/planetarium/#Explorelive Cost: $9 ================================== Sunday, 04/07/19 02:00 PM - 04:00 PM Diablo Valley College Performing Arts Center 321 Golf Club Rd Pleasant Hill, CA 94523 Celebrating Stephen Hawking: How Black Holes are Not Quite Black Scientists and science enthusiasts are mourning the passing of Stephen Hawking, one of the great minds and spirits of our time. In this introductory, non-technical talk, astronomer Andrew Fraknoi will briefly summarize Hawking’s life, and talk about the importance of his scientific work. He’ll focus particularly on Hawking’s work merging the world of the big and heavy (described by Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity) with the world of the small and light (described by quantum mechanics). Then he’ll describe how this merger led to the idea of mini black holes, “Hawking Radiation,” and the bizarre notion that black holes don’t have to be fully black. No background in science or math will be required, but be prepared to have your mind boggled. Speaker: Andrew Fraknoi, Univ. of San Francisco Benefit for Diablo Valley College Emeritus Program Advance tickets strongly recommended here. Website: https://diablo.cr3.rschooltoday.com/public/costoption/class_id/1516/public/1/sp/ Cost: $25 Adults, $10 ages 10 - 15 ================================== Monday, 04/08/19 12:10 PM - 01:00 PM Campbell Hall, Rm 131 UC Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720 Electromagnetic counterparts of compact binary coalescence (CBC) gravitational wave events Speaker: Bing Zhang, Univ. of Nevada Las Vegas Website: http://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/ Cost: Free ================================== Monday, 04/08/19 7:30 PM Nourse Theater 275 Hayes St San Francisco, CA 94102 Destiny Beyond Earth: Interstellar Travel & Immortality Dr. Michio Kaku is a theoretical physicist and futurist, and the co-founder of string field theory, a branch of the theoretical framework of string theory. His work follows the directive of Einstein, attempting to develop a Theory of Everything that unites the four fundamental forces of the universe. His books include The Future of the Mind, Physics of the Future, Physics of the Impossible, and Parallel Worlds. His most recent, The Future of Humanity: Terraforming Mars, Interstellar Travel, Immortality, and Our Destiny Beyond Earth considers the concrete, scientific possibility of moving human civilization to outer space, drawing upon astrophysics, artificial intelligence, and cutting-edge developments in robotics, nanotechnology, and biotechnology to make a case for the potentials of sustainable human life as it intersects with new technology. Dr. Kaku is also the science correspondent for CBS: This Morning, host of two weekly science radio programs, Science Fantastic and Explorations in Science and a Professor in Theoretical Physics at the City University of New York. Member presale starts 12/17/2018 Website: https://www.cityarts.net/event/destiny-beyond-earth-interstellar-travel-immortality-with-dr-michio-kaku/ Cost: TBA ================================== Tuesday, 04/09/19 04:30 PM - 05:30 PM Hewlett Teaching Center 370 Serra Mall, Room 201 Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305 Black Holes, Holography, and Entanglement Prof. Veronika Hubeny of the University of California at Davis will give the Applied Physics/Physics collqouium. Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/black-holes-holography-and-entanglement Cost: Free ================================== Wednesday, 04/10/19 07:00 PM - 09:00 PM Silicon Valley Astronomy Lecture Series Foothill College Smithwick Theater Los Altos Hills, CA 94022 Ocean Worlds of the Outer Solar System Where is the best place to find living life beyond Earth? It may be that the small, ice-covered moons of Jupiter and Saturn harbor some of the most habitable real estate in our Solar System. Life loves liquid water and these moons have lots of it! Such oceans worlds have likely persisted for much of the history of the solar system and as a result they are compelling targets for our exploration. Dr. Hand will explain the science behind our understanding of these worlds, with a special focus on Jupiter’s intriguing moon Europa, which is a top priority for future NASA missions. Speaker: Dr. Kevin Hand, NASA Website: https://www.foothill.edu/astronomy/ Cost: Free ($3 parking) ================================== Friday April 12th, 2019 at 7:30pm Peninsula Astronomical Society NEW VENUE - Los Altos Public Library ADDRESS is -- 13 S. San Antonio Road, Los Altos, CA 94022 "Can Red Dwarf Stars Host Habitable Planets?" by Dr. Gibor Basri - Professor at UC Berkeley. ABSTRACT -- Much recent news about exoplanets has concerned the discovery of earth-sized planets in the “habitable zone” of "red dwarf" stars. This is partly because such planets are more easily found around small stars, and partly because most stars are red dwarfs. Can planets in the habitable zone (I’ll expand on this concept) around a red dwarf actually harbor earth-like life? Among the potential problems are stellar magnetic activity and the fact that the planets will always have one side towards the star. Until recently most astronomers would have said “no” but this is changing. I’ll explain why and talk about recent discoveries. BIO -- Gibor Basri joined the faculty of the Berkeley Astronomy Department in 1982. His areas of research include star formation, solar and low mass stars, and stellar magnetic activity. He was an early pioneer in the study of brown dwarfs. He has extensively used telescopes at the Lick and Keck Observatories, and was a Co-Investigator on NASA's Kepler mission, which has revolutionized our knowledge about exoplanets. He is a recipient of the Sagan award for communicating science. ================================== Friday, April 12, 2019 8:45 PM to 10:45 PM San Jose Astronomical Associaiton In-Town Star Party Houge Park 3972 Twilight Dr · San Jose, CA Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA's In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up! ================================== Fri. 04/12/2019 7PM Telescope Makers Workshop Chabot Space and Science Center 10000 Skyline Boulevard Oakland, CA 94619-2450 Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope! For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914. ================================== Fri. 04/12/2019 and Sat. 04/13/2019 Chabot Space and Science Center 10000 Skyline Boulevard Oakland, CA 94619-2450 (510) 336-7300 EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/ Free Telescope Viewing Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action! Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission. 12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting) ================================== Fri. 04/12/2019 9PM Foothill College 12345 El Monte Rd Los Altos Hills, CA 94022 Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky. Admission is free. Parking is $3 Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued. Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe! ================================== Sat. 04/13/2019 10AM Foothill College 12345 El Monte Rd Los Altos Hills, CA 94022 Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes. Admission is free. Parking is $3 Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued. ================================== Saturday, 04/13/19 7:00 PM Fujitsu Planetarium at De Anza College 21250 Stevens Creek Blvd (by parking lot E) Cupertino, CA 95014 Explore Live! - Constellations and Culture The De Anza College Planetarium will present “Explore Live!” - a live astronomy series featuring presentations by our professional planetarium staff. Website: http://www.deanza.edu/planetarium/#Explorelive Cost: $9 ================================== Saturday, 04/13/19 7:30 PM Cushing Memorial ('Mountain') Amphitheater Mt Tamalpais State Park Pan Toll Road and Ridgecrest Blvd Mill Valley, CA 94941 Black Holes: Big, Small; Singlets, Twins Black holes are among the most fascinating astrophysical objects. Come learn how astronomers use the fatal attraction of gravity to find black holes with masses from ten times that of the sun to ten billion times. Some black holes come as twins - two holes whose violent merger makes spacetime vibrate in the form of gravitational waves. Speaker: Chung-Pei Ma, UC Berkeley Website: http://www.friendsofmttam.org/astronomy/schedule Cost: Free ================================== Saturday, 04/13/19 08:30 PM - 10:30 PM College of San Mateo Bldg 36 1700 W Hillsdale Rd San Mateo, CA 94402 Jazz Under the Stars Come peer through our telescopes and see craters on the Moon, the visible planets, star clusters, and more while we listen to CSM's very own KCSM Jazz 91 FM. Dress warmly. Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5. Directions are available on the Maps, Directions & Parking page. Website: http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/astronomy/jazz.asp Cost: Free ================================== Saturday, 04/13/19 All Day Various UC Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720 CalDay 2019 It is the annual open house at UC Berkeley! Virtually every department is offering talks and demonstrations. Attendance is free for all. See the weblink for the schedule. Website: https://calday.berkeley.edu Cost: Free ================================== Sunday, 04/14/19 07:00 PM - 10:00 PM City Star Parties - Parade Grounds at the Presidio 103 Montgomery St. Main Post Lawn San Francisco, CA 94129 San Francisco City Star Party: Presidio @ Parade Grounds in the Presidio of San Francisco Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure. Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel! Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/events/cat_ids~55/%22%3e%20City%20Star%20Parties/ Cost: Free

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