Bay Astro – Events of Week of 04/08/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Monday, 04/08/19
12:10 PM – 01:00 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Electromagnetic counterparts of compact binary coalescence (CBC) gravitational wave events

Speaker: Bing Zhang, Univ. of Nevada Las Vegas

Website: http://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/08/19 7:30 PM

Nourse Theater
275 Hayes St
San Francisco, CA 94102

Destiny Beyond Earth: Interstellar Travel & Immortality

Dr. Michio Kaku is a theoretical physicist and futurist, and the co-founder of string field theory, a branch of the theoretical framework of string theory. His work follows the directive of Einstein, attempting to develop a Theory of Everything that unites the four fundamental forces of the universe. His books include The Future of the Mind, Physics of the Future, Physics of the Impossible, and Parallel Worlds. His most recent, The Future of Humanity: Terraforming Mars, Interstellar Travel, Immortality, and Our Destiny Beyond Earth considers the concrete, scientific possibility of moving human civilization to outer space, drawing upon astrophysics, artificial intelligence, and cutting-edge developments in robotics, nanotechnology, and biotechnology to make a case for the potentials of sustainable human life as it intersects with new technology. Dr. Kaku is also the science correspondent for CBS: This Morning, host of two weekly science radio programs, Science Fantastic and Explorations in Science and a Professor in Theoretical Physics at the City University of New York.
Member presale starts 12/17/2018

Website: https://www.cityarts.net/event/destiny-beyond-earth-interstellar-travel-immortality-with-dr-michio-kaku/

Cost: $29

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Tuesday, 04/09/19
04:30 PM – 05:30 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 201
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Black Holes, Holography, and Entanglement
Prof. Veronika Hubeny of the University of California at Davis will give the Applied Physics/Physics collqouium.

Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/black-holes-holography-and-entanglement

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 04/10/19
07:00 PM – 09:00 PM

Silicon Valley Astronomy Lecture Series
Foothill College
Smithwick Theater
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Ocean Worlds of the Outer Solar System

Where is the best place to find living life beyond Earth? It may be that the small, ice-covered moons of Jupiter and Saturn harbor some of the most habitable real estate in our Solar System. Life loves liquid water and these moons have lots of it! Such oceans worlds have likely persisted for much of the history of the solar system and as a result they are compelling targets for our exploration. Dr. Hand will explain the science behind our understanding of these worlds, with a special focus on Jupiter’s intriguing moon Europa, which is a top priority for future NASA missions.

Speaker: Dr. Kevin Hand, NASA

Website: https://www.foothill.edu/astronomy/

Cost: Free ($3 parking)

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Friday April 12th, 2019 at 7:30pm

Peninsula Astronomical Society
Los Altos Public Library
13 S. San Antonio Road
Los Altos, CA 94022———Note New Venue

“Can Red Dwarf Stars Host Habitable Planets?”

Dr. Gibor Basri – Professor at UC Berkeley.

ABSTRACT — Much recent news about exoplanets has concerned the discovery of earth-sized planets in the “habitable zone” of “red dwarf” stars. This is partly because such planets are more easily found around small stars, and partly because most stars are red dwarfs. Can planets in the habitable zone (I’ll expand on this concept) around a red dwarf actually harbor earth-like life? Among the potential problems are stellar magnetic activity and the fact that the planets will always have one side towards the star. Until recently most astronomers would have said “no” but this is changing. I’ll explain why and talk about recent discoveries.

BIO — Gibor Basri joined the faculty of the Berkeley Astronomy Department in 1982. His areas of research include star formation, solar and low mass stars, and stellar magnetic activity. He was an early pioneer in the study of brown dwarfs. He has extensively used telescopes at the Lick and Keck Observatories, and was a Co-Investigator on NASA’s Kepler mission, which has revolutionized our knowledge about exoplanets. He is a recipient of the Sagan award for communicating science.

Website: http://www.pastro.org/dnn/

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Friday, April 12, 2019
8:45 PM to 10:45 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr.
San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

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Fri. 04/12/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 04/12/2019 and Sat. 04/13/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 04/12/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 04/13/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 04/13/19 7:00 PM

Fujitsu Planetarium at De Anza College
21250 Stevens Creek Blvd
(by parking lot E)
Cupertino, CA 95014

Explore Live! – Constellations and Culture

The De Anza College Planetarium will present “Explore Live!” – a live astronomy series featuring presentations by our professional planetarium staff.

Website: http://www.deanza.edu/planetarium/#Explorelive

Cost: $9

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Saturday, 04/13/19 7:30 PM

Cushing Memorial (‘Mountain’) Amphitheater
Mt Tamalpais State Park
Pan Toll Road and Ridgecrest Blvd
Mill Valley, CA 94941

Exoplanets: The How, What & Why of Planets Around Other Stars
In the last decade, the commissioning of new observatories (both on Earth and in space) and the development of new techniques for analyzing large datasets (including the application of deep learning) have allowed dramatic advancements in our understanding of extrasolar planets. This talk will explore how exoplanets are formed, what techniques allow their discovery, and why they have been fundamental to understanding our place in the Universe.

Speaker: Dr. Megan Ansdell, Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Integrative Planetary Sciences, UC Berkeley

Website: http://www.friendsofmttam.org/astronomy/schedule

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Saturday, 04/13/19
08:30 PM – 10:30 PM

College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Jazz Under the Stars

Come peer through our telescopes and see craters on the Moon, the visible planets, star clusters, and more while we listen to CSM’s very own KCSM Jazz 91 FM. Dress warmly. Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5. Directions are available on the Maps, Directions & Parking page.

Website: http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/astronomy/jazz.asp

Cost: Free

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Sunday, 04/14/19
07:00 PM – 10:00 PM

City Star Parties – Parade Grounds at the Presidio
103 Montgomery St.
Main Post Lawn
San Francisco, CA 94129

San Francisco City Star Party: Presidio @ Parade Grounds in the Presidio of San Francisco

Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.
Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/events/cat_ids~55/%22%3e%20City%20Star%20Parties/

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/15/19
12:10 PM – 01:00 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The Dynamical Assembly of LIGO Sources in Dense Stellar Systems
Speaker: Nicholas Stone, Columbia Univ/Hebrew Univ

Website: http://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 04/17/19
04:30 PM – 05:30 PM

David Packard Electrical Engineering Building
Room 101
350 Serra Mall
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Imaging a Black Hole with the Event Horizon Telescope

This talk will present the methods and procedures used to produce the first results from the Event Horizon Telescope. It is theorized that a black hole will leave a “shadow” on a background of hot gas. Taking a picture of this black hole shadow could help to address a number of important scientific questions, both on the nature of black holes and the validity of general relativity. Unfortunately, due to its small size, traditional imaging approaches require an Earth-sized radio telescope. In this talk, I discuss techniques we have developed to photograph a black hole using the Event Horizon Telescope, a network of telescopes scattered across the globe. Imaging a black hole’s structure with this computational telescope requires us to reconstruct images from sparse measurements, heavily corrupted by atmospheric error.

Speaker: Katie Bouman, CalTech

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/imaging-black-hole-event-horizon-telescope

Cost: Free

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Wed. April 17 2019 7:30 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum Theater
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114

“Resolving the Local Universe with the Hubble and James Webb Space Telescopes”

Daniel Weisz, PhD, UC Berkeley

Most galaxies are so far away that they appear to us only as faint smudges. However, for galaxies that reside in our Galactic neighborhood, the clarity and sensitivity of the Hubble Space Telescope transforms them from smudges into collections of individual stars. These observations allow astronomers to study how galaxies form and evolve one star at a time.
In this talk, I will highlight some of the amazing science and images produced by Hubble observations of local galaxies from the past three decades. The pinnacle of these studies is the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) program, an 800 hour Hubble survey of our sibling galaxy Andromeda, and one of the largest Hubble programs ever conducted. I will describe the PHAT survey and its scientific impact. I will discuss plans for James Webb Space Telescope, which will succeed Hubble as the most sensitive telescope in existence following its launch in 2021.

Dan Weisz is an Assistant Professor of Astronomy at UC Berkeley. He is an observational astronomer who primarily uses the Hubble Space Telescope to resolve nearby galaxies to study a wide range of phenomena ranging from dark matter to how stars and galaxies form and evolve.

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org

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Thursday, 04/18/19-note change in date
07:00 PM – 08:30 PM

USGS Evening Public Lecture Series
US Geologic Survey
Bldg 3, 2nd Floor Rambo Auditorium
345 Middlefield Road
Menlo Park, CA 94025

The Story of California’s Changing Ecosystems: As Observed from Space

• How can we use images from space to help us understand changes to our coasts, rangelands, forests and wildlife habitats?
• How can they help to predict future changes?
• What more can we learn from advances in earth observing technologies?
Speaker: Kristin Byrd, USGS

Website: https://online.wr.usgs.gov/calendar/

Cost: Free

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Friday, 04/19/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Dark Matter From Light Sterile Neutrino Nuggets

From cosmological observations we know that dark matter must display clustering properties similar to cold dark matter(CDM) at least on the largest scales. However, the particle nature of DM is still not known. But at smaller scales the situation remains unclear from astrophysical observations which does not agree well with CDM predictions. Non-detection of CDM in direct search experiments and small scale astrophysical anomalies might be giving us strong hints to look for other particle physics candidates of dark matter arising from different physics. I will discuss one such scenario where dark matter arises much later in the universe though formation of nuggets when sterile neutrinos clump together few e-folding before CMB.

Speaker: Subinoy Das (Indian Institute of Astrophysics)

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/dark-matter-light-sterile-neutrino-nuggets

Cost: Free

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Friday, 04/19/19 7:30 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers
1893 N. Vasco Rd
Unitarian Universalist Church
Livermore, CA 94551

Reflections on Human Space Flight (Why Single-planet Species Don’t Survive)
Speaker: Jim Newman

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

Cost: Free

==============================

Fri. 04/19/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 04/19/2019 and Sat. 04/20/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 04/19/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 04/20/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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