Bay Astro – Events of Week of 04/15/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Monday, 04/15/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

The Accelerated Universe

The universe has gone through two phases of accelerated expansion: a primordial phase called cosmic inflation and an ongoing phase that has been taking place for the last 6 billions years.

To explore cosmic inflation, we are now on the hunt for the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-modes. This signal is expected to be tenuous so we need to characterize and understand the different sources of CMB B-modes beyond cosmic inflation. In the first part of this talk, I will highlight results from Lemarchand et al, submitted to A&A, 2018 (arXiv:1810.09221 ) and my ongoing work addressing one astrophysical effect: Faraday rotation from magnetic field in clusters. I will explain this phenomenon and show results of its impact on CMB B-modes.

In the second part of my talk I will focus on understanding the origin of the ongoing cosmic acceleration. Observations are indeed showing that the universe is currently going through a phase of accelerated expansion. Different explanations for this acceleration are possible. One possiblity is that general relativity does not correctly describe the laws of gravity on cosmological scales. I have been interested in doing tests of gravity using cosmological observables of the growth of structure and especially weak gravitational lensing. I will first give a general introduction to the problem of cosmic acceleration and its observables. I will then present the results from Ferté et al, to appear in PRD (arXiv:1712.01846 ) constraining deviations to general relativity using available data sets, in addition to forecasts of these constraints with future experiments. I will end presenting a similar analysis and results I have been involved in using the first year of observation of the Dark Energy Survey (DES collaboration, submitted to PRD, 2018 arXiv:1810.02499 ). I will also highlight constrains on extensions to the standard model of cosmology from this work.

Speaker: Agnes Ferte, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/accelerated-universe

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/15/19
12:10 PM – 01:00 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The Dynamical Assembly of LIGO Sources in Dense Stellar Systems
Speaker: Nicholas Stone, Columbia Univ/Hebrew Univ

Website: http://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/15/19
02:00 PM – 03:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

In search of optimal big data analysis: from cosmology to machine learning
Speaker: Uros Seljak (UC Berkeley)

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/search-optimal-big-data-analysis-cosmology-machine-learning

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/15/19 3:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
2575 Sand Hill Rd, Building 51
Kavli Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Fundamental Physics with Antihydrogen Atoms

The ALPHA Collaboration at CERN has combined antiprotons and positrons to create and probe antihydrogen atoms. ALPHA can now store over 1000 antihydrogen atoms at a time for thousands of seconds. We have developed techniques to conduct precision physics using minimal numbers of antiatoms. The comparison of antihydrogen and hydrogen spectra are sensitive probes of Charge-Parity-Time (CPT) Symmetry. We have conducted the first precision physics experiments on antihydrogen, measuring the 1S-2S and the hyperfine transition bandwidths to the 10kHz level. The charge of antihydrogen has been limited to less than 0.7ppb of the magnitude of the electron charge, and the Lyman-alpha transition, critical for laser cooling, has been excited. A gravity experiment designed to measure antihydrogen acceleration in the Earth’s field to 1% accuracy is being constructed. In this talk I will describe ALPHAs techniques, physics results, and our plans for the future.

Speaker: Johathan Wurtele, UC Berkeley

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/fundamental-physics-antihydrogen-atoms

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, Apr 16 1:10PM

Cosmology seminar
Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Kurt Hinterbichler, CWRU

UV constraints on IR modifications of gravity

We will review the classes of proposals for explaining dark energy through new long-range degrees of freedom. These are typically effective field theories with low strong coupling scales, and they therefore require UV completion, i.e. an accounting of what happens at higher energies. One such proposal is massive gravity, the effective field theory of a massive spin-2 degree of freedom. We will discuss the problem of UV completion in massive gravity, a possible Higgs mechanism for gravity, and theoretical constraints that can be put on such possibilities.

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

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Wednesday, 04/17/19
04:30 PM – 05:30 PM

David Packard Electrical Engineering Building
Room 101
350 Serra Mall
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Imaging a Black Hole with the Event Horizon Telescope

This talk will present the methods and procedures used to produce the first results from the Event Horizon Telescope. It is theorized that a black hole will leave a “shadow” on a background of hot gas. Taking a picture of this black hole shadow could help to address a number of important scientific questions, both on the nature of black holes and the validity of general relativity. Unfortunately, due to its small size, traditional imaging approaches require an Earth-sized radio telescope. In this talk, I discuss techniques we have developed to photograph a black hole using the Event Horizon Telescope, a network of telescopes scattered across the globe. Imaging a black hole’s structure with this computational telescope requires us to reconstruct images from sparse measurements, heavily corrupted by atmospheric error.

Speaker: Katie Bouman, CalTech

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/imaging-black-hole-event-horizon-telescope

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 04/17/19
07:00 PM – 08:00 PM

SETI Institute: SETI Talks
SRI International
333 Ravenswood Ave
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Where is the Origin of Life on Earth?

To answer the iconic question “Are We Alone?”, scientists around the world are also attempting to understand the origin of life. There are many pieces to the puzzle of how life began and many ways to put them together into a big picture. Some of the pieces are firmly established by the laws of chemistry and physics. Others are conjectures about what Earth was like four billion years ago, based on extrapolations of what we know from observing Earth today. However, there are still major gaps in our knowledge, and these are necessarily filled in by best guesses.

We invited talented scientists to discuss their different opinions about the origin of life and the site of life’s origin. Most of them will agree that liquid water was necessary, but if we had a time machine and went back in time, would we find life first in a hydrothermal submarine setting in sea water or a fresh water site associated with emerging land masses?

Biologist David Deamer, a Research Professor of Biomolecular Engineering at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and multi-disciplinary scientist Bruce Damer, Associate Researcher in the Department of Biomolecular Engineering at UC Santa Cruz, will describe their most recent work, which infers that hydrothermal pools are the most plausible site for the origin of life. Both biologists have been collaborating since 2016 on a full conception of the Terrestrial Origin of Life Hypothesis.

Lynn Rothschild, Senior Scientist at NASA’s Ames Research Center and Adjunct Professor of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry at Brown University, who is an astrobiologist/ synthetic biologist specializing in molecular approaches to evolution, particularly in microbes and the application of synthetic biology to NASA’s missions, will provide an evolutionary biologist’s perspective on the subject.

Website: https://seti.org/event/where-origin-life-earth

Cost: Free

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Wed. April 17 2019 7:30 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum Theater
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114

“Resolving the Local Universe with the Hubble and James Webb Space Telescopes”

Daniel Weisz, PhD, UC Berkeley

Most galaxies are so far away that they appear to us only as faint smudges. However, for galaxies that reside in our Galactic neighborhood, the clarity and sensitivity of the Hubble Space Telescope transforms them from smudges into collections of individual stars. These observations allow astronomers to study how galaxies form and evolve one star at a time.
In this talk, I will highlight some of the amazing science and images produced by Hubble observations of local galaxies from the past three decades. The pinnacle of these studies is the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) program, an 800 hour Hubble survey of our sibling galaxy Andromeda, and one of the largest Hubble programs ever conducted. I will describe the PHAT survey and its scientific impact. I will discuss plans for James Webb Space Telescope, which will succeed Hubble as the most sensitive telescope in existence following its launch in 2021.

Dan Weisz is an Assistant Professor of Astronomy at UC Berkeley. He is an observational astronomer who primarily uses the Hubble Space Telescope to resolve nearby galaxies to study a wide range of phenomena ranging from dark matter to how stars and galaxies form and evolve.

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org

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Thursday, 04/18/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Physics and Astrophysics Building Room 102/103
452 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Ghosts of atmospheres past: modeling atmospheric formation and evolution on rocky planets

One of the goals of near-term exoplanet observations is to identify habitable rocky planets and characterize their atmospheres. Solar System studies have taught us that the chemistry of the protoplanetary disk from which they formed, the physics and chemistry of the accretion process, and subsequent loss and exchange between the atmosphere and solid planet will all affect the present-day, measurable atmospheric compositions of rocky exoplanets. Understanding the initial compositions and the processes that have subsequently shaped them is essential to help predict and understand the atmospheres and surface environments of the new types of rocky planets being discovered. Many of these planets also experience conditions such as magma oceans not found on Solar System planets since their accretion. Through iterations of modeling and observing these new rocky planets, we may learn more about the conditions of atmospheric formation and evolution within the Solar System as well. I will discuss past modeling efforts aimed at a few of the processes related to atmosphere formation and evolution and the next steps in making progress on understanding the early atmospheres of rocky (exo)planets.

Speaker: Laura Schaefer, Stanford

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/ghosts-atmospheres-past-modeling-atmospheric-formation-and-evolution-rocky-planets

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 04/18/19 4:00 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

UC Berkeley Astronomy Colloquium

Imaging a Black Hole with the Event Horizon Telescope

Speaker: Shepard Doelmans, Harvard

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/i/astronomy-colloquium

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 04/18/19-note change in date
07:00 PM – 08:30 PM

USGS Evening Public Lecture Series
US Geologic Survey
Bldg 3, 2nd Floor Rambo Auditorium
345 Middlefield Road
Menlo Park, CA 94025

The Story of California’s Changing Ecosystems: As Observed from Space

• How can we use images from space to help us understand changes to our coasts, rangelands, forests and wildlife habitats?
• How can they help to predict future changes?
• What more can we learn from advances in earth observing technologies?
Speaker: Kristin Byrd, USGS

Website: https://online.wr.usgs.gov/calendar/

Cost: Free

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Friday, 04/19/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Dark Matter From Light Sterile Neutrino Nuggets

From cosmological observations we know that dark matter must display clustering properties similar to cold dark matter(CDM) at least on the largest scales. However, the particle nature of DM is still not known. But at smaller scales the situation remains unclear from astrophysical observations which does not agree well with CDM predictions. Non-detection of CDM in direct search experiments and small scale astrophysical anomalies might be giving us strong hints to look for other particle physics candidates of dark matter arising from different physics. I will discuss one such scenario where dark matter arises much later in the universe though formation of nuggets when sterile neutrinos clump together few e-folding before CMB.

Speaker: Subinoy Das (Indian Institute of Astrophysics)

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/dark-matter-light-sterile-neutrino-nuggets

Cost: Free

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Friday, 04/19/19 7:30 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers
1893 N. Vasco Rd
Unitarian Universalist Church
Livermore, CA 94551

Reflections on Human Space Flight (Why Single-planet Species Don’t Survive)
Speaker: Jim Newman

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

Cost: Free

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Fri. 04/19/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 04/19/2019 and Sat. 04/20/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri. 04/19/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 04/20/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 04/20/19 7:30 PM

East Bay Astronomical Society
Chabot Space & Science Center, 10000 Skyline Blvd
2nd Floor, Spees Bldg, Galileo Room
Oakland, CA 94619

New Horizons, NASA’s Pluto-Kuiper Belt Mission and the 2014 MU69 (“ULTIMA THULE”) Encounter

In 2006, NASA dispatched an ambassador to the planetary frontier, The New Horizons spacecraft. After 10 years and more than 3 billion miles, on a historic voyage that has already taken it over the storms and around the moons of Jupiter, New Horizons has shed light on new kinds of worlds on the outskirts of the solar system. On July 14, 2015, New Horizons flew 12,500 km (7,800 mi) above the surface of Pluto and continued into rare territory, encountering the cold classical Kuiper Belt object (KBO) 2014 MU69 (informally named “Ultima Thule”) on 1 January 2019.

Dr. Jeff Moore of NASA Ames will review the initial geological analysis of MU69, which has two lobes that have been informally designated “Ultima” and “Thule” by the New Horizons team.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

Cost: Free

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Sunday, April 21, 2019
12:00 PM to 3:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association Spring Swap Meet
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr.
San Jose, CA

This very low-key, flea market-like event. You can make your underused astronomy gear available to the local astronomy community, and make a couple bucks while you’re at it. If you are looking for gear, come by and see what’s available.

The swap meet will be held from 12 noon until about 3pm, depending on how quickly things slow down.

And finally, remember that this is a service to the local astronomy community.

Donations of 10% of sales to the SJAA are suggested.

Website: http://www.sjaa.net/swap-meet/

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Monday, 04/22/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Multi-Variate Dependent Halo and Galaxy Assembly Bias

Investigating the clustering of halos and galaxies helps us learn about cosmology and galaxy formation physics. The clustering of dark matter halos is found to depend on not only halo mass but also halo properties related to their formation history or environment, which is called halo assembly bias. If galaxy properties depend on halo assembly properties in addition to halo mass, the clustering of galaxies would show the so-called galaxy assembly bias. Halo and galaxy assembly bias affects how accurate galaxy clustering can be modeled, and may lead to systematics in constraining cosmology and galaxy formation from galaxy clustering. In this talk, I will first review previous study of halo assembly bias and present an investigation of the joint dependence of halo bias on halo mass and halo assembly variables based on N-body simulations. Then I will discuss the possibility of constructing a combination of halo variables to absorb the halo assembly bias effect. Finally, I will present galaxy assembly bias of central galaxies in a hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulation and propose a simple way to incorporate the effect into the halo model of galaxy clustering.

Speaker:Xiaoju Xu, Univ. of Utah

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/multi-variate-dependent-halo-and-galaxy-assembly-bias

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/22/19 12:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Black hole formation, growth, and feedback
Speaker: Melanie Habouzit, CCA

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/22/19
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
2575 Sand Hill Rd, Building 51
Kavli Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Measuring gravitational waves with atom interferometry

In recent years, atom interferometry and atomic clocks have made impressive gains in sensitivity and time precision. The best atomic clocks have stability corresponding to a loss of less than one second in the lifetime of the universe. Matter wave interferometers have achieved record-breaking coherence times (seconds) and atomic wavepacket separations (over half a meter), resulting in a significant enhancement in accelerometer and gravity gradiometer sensitivity. Leveraging these advances, atomic sensors are now poised to become a powerful tool for discovery in fundamental physics. I will highlight ongoing efforts to test aspects of general relativity and quantum mechanics, and search for new fundamental interactions. A particularly exciting direction is gravitational wave detection. I will describe the Mid-band Atomic Gravitational wave Interferometric Sensor (MAGIS) proposal, which is targeted to detect gravitational waves in a frequency band complementary to existing detectors (0.03 Hz – 10 Hz), the optimal frequency range to support multi-messenger astronomy. Finally, I will discuss MAGIS-100, a 100-meter tall atomic sensor being constructed that will serve as a prototype of such a detector, and will also be sensitive to proposed ultra-light dark matter (scalar and vector couplings) at unprecedented levels.

Speaker: Jason Hogan, Stanford

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/atom-interferometry-for-fundamental-physics-and-gravitational-wave-detection

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 4/23/2019
7:00 PM – 9:15 PM

Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Avenue
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Bonestell Documentary.

This documentary reveals that the Golden Gate Bridge, the film “Destination Moon” and America’s space program were all part of the remarkable, nine-decade life and legacy of Chesley Bonestell, “The Father of Space Art,” whose paintings still inspire us today. See: www.chesleybonestell.com.

Chesley Bonestell’s mesmerizing depiction of “Saturn As Seen From Titan” became known as “the painting that launched a thousand careers.” Told by the many people who were influenced by Chesley Bonestell or knew him personally and punctuated with rare interview footage of the artist himself, this two-time Best Documentary award-winning film compellingly chronicles the life of a quiet, artistic visionary, whose architecture and space art continue to inspire us to reach for the stars.

Guest Speakers: Following the screening, a special audience Q&A will take place with Producer/Director/Writer Douglass M. Stewart, Jr., and film participants Rocket Engineer Rocco Lardiere and Photographer Robert E. David.

FREE Admission, open to the public.

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Thursday, 04/25/19
06:00 PM – 09:00 PM

Grace Lutheran Church
3201 Ulloa St
San Francisco, CA 94109

Where Bill Gates’ Great Grand-daughter Will Go for Her Honeymoon: The Top Tourist Sights of the Solar System

Using spectacular images from space probes and the world’s largest telescopes, we will explore the most intriguing future “tourist destinations” among the planets and moons in our cosmic neighborhood. Our stops will include the 4,000-mile lava channel on Venus, the towering Mount Olympus volcano on Mars (three times the height of Mount Everest), the awesome Verona Cliffs on the moon Miranda (which are the tallest “lover’s leap” in the solar system), and the recently discovered salt-water steam geysers on Saturn’s intriguing moon Enceladus (nicknamed “Cold Faithful.”)

Speaker: Andrew Fraknoi, Foothill Community College, retired

Time: Social Hour: 6:00 pm, Dinner: 6:45 pm, and Program: 7:45 pm.

To reserve, Send a check for $24 made out to “Sierra Club, SF Bay Chapter” to: Gerry Souzis, 1801 California St., #405, San Francisco, CA 94109. On the check, please put the month of the dinner and the number of people you are paying for. A phone number would be useful in case of some unexpected cancellation. It is most convenient for us to receive your check at least 4 days before the scheduled dinner.

Non-members are welcome. We ask you to bring your own wine or soft drinks. Glasses and ice are available. Let us know if you wish vegetarian dinner.

Contact: Gerry Souzis
Email: gsouzis@hotmail.com

Cost: $24 including dinner

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Thursday, 04/25/19 8:00 PM

Verdi Club
2424 Mariposa St
San Francisco, CA 94110

Wonderfest: Ask a Science Envoy: Black Holes and Making Memories

Wonderfest Science Envoys are early-career researchers with special communication skills and aspirations. Following short talks on provocative modern science topics, these two Science Envoys will answer questions with insight and enthusiasm:

• UC Berkeley astronomer Fatima Abdurrahman debunks sci-fi movie tropes and explains exactly what a black hole is, why they’re so hard to find, and how we can circumvent that difficulty to find them.
• Stanford neuroscientist Tyler Bonnen explores how an experience becomes a memory. He’ll provide a sketch of information processing in the brain – from perceptual encoding to conscious recollection.

Website: http://wonderfest.org/black-holes-making-memories/

Cost: Free

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Friday, 04/26/19
02:30 PM – 03:30 PM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Probing the unidentified Fermi blazar-like population using optical polarization and machine learning

Speaker: Yannis Liodakis

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/probing-unidentified-fermi-blazar-population-using-optical-polarization-and-machine-learning

Cost: Free

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Friday, April 26, 2019
9:00 PM to 11:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr
San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

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Fri. 04/26/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 04/26/2019 and Sat. 04/27/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 04/26/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 04/27/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Sat. 04/27/2019
Sunset: 7:54 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive
San Carlos, CA

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset… In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

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Saturday, 04/27/19 5:00 PM

Fujitsu Planetarium at De Anza College
21250 Stevens Creek Blvd
(by parking lot E)
Cupertino, CA 95014

Explore Live! – Flight to the Edge of the Universe

The De Anza College Planetarium will present “Explore Live!” – a live astronomy series featuring presentations by our professional planetarium staff.

Website: http://www.deanza.edu/planetarium/#Explorelive

Cost: $9

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Sunday, 04/28/19 3:00 PM

ExplOratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

Full-Spectrum Science with Ron Hipschman: Sound

What is sound? How high a pitch can you hear? Can you measure the speed of sound with a yardstick? Can two sounds add up to no sound? Explore these questions and more in this resonant presentation.

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/full-spectrum-science-ron-hipschman-sound-4-28-2019

Cost: Free with admission

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