Bay Astro – Events of Week of 04/22/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Monday, 04/22/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Multi-Variate Dependent Halo and Galaxy Assembly Bias

Investigating the clustering of halos and galaxies helps us learn about cosmology and galaxy formation physics. The clustering of dark matter halos is found to depend on not only halo mass but also halo properties related to their formation history or environment, which is called halo assembly bias. If galaxy properties depend on halo assembly properties in addition to halo mass, the clustering of galaxies would show the so-called galaxy assembly bias. Halo and galaxy assembly bias affects how accurate galaxy clustering can be modeled, and may lead to systematics in constraining cosmology and galaxy formation from galaxy clustering. In this talk, I will first review previous study of halo assembly bias and present an investigation of the joint dependence of halo bias on halo mass and halo assembly variables based on N-body simulations. Then I will discuss the possibility of constructing a combination of halo variables to absorb the halo assembly bias effect. Finally, I will present galaxy assembly bias of central galaxies in a hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulation and propose a simple way to incorporate the effect into the halo model of galaxy clustering.

Speaker:Xiaoju Xu, Univ. of Utah

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/multi-variate-dependent-halo-and-galaxy-assembly-bias

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/22/19 12:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Black hole formation, growth, and feedback
Speaker: Melanie Habouzit, CCA

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/22/19
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
2575 Sand Hill Rd, Building 51
Kavli Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Measuring gravitational waves with atom interferometry

In recent years, atom interferometry and atomic clocks have made impressive gains in sensitivity and time precision. The best atomic clocks have stability corresponding to a loss of less than one second in the lifetime of the universe. Matter wave interferometers have achieved record-breaking coherence times (seconds) and atomic wavepacket separations (over half a meter), resulting in a significant enhancement in accelerometer and gravity gradiometer sensitivity. Leveraging these advances, atomic sensors are now poised to become a powerful tool for discovery in fundamental physics. I will highlight ongoing efforts to test aspects of general relativity and quantum mechanics, and search for new fundamental interactions. A particularly exciting direction is gravitational wave detection. I will describe the Mid-band Atomic Gravitational wave Interferometric Sensor (MAGIS) proposal, which is targeted to detect gravitational waves in a frequency band complementary to existing detectors (0.03 Hz – 10 Hz), the optimal frequency range to support multi-messenger astronomy. Finally, I will discuss MAGIS-100, a 100-meter tall atomic sensor being constructed that will serve as a prototype of such a detector, and will also be sensitive to proposed ultra-light dark matter (scalar and vector couplings) at unprecedented levels.

Speaker: Jason Hogan, Stanford

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/atom-interferometry-for-fundamental-physics-and-gravitational-wave-detection

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/22/19 4:15 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The Black Hole Shadow in the M87 Galaxy

The Event Horizon Telescope recently revealed the first picture of the black-hole shadow in the center of the M87 galaxy. I will discuss the technological and theoretical advances during the last decade that led to this result. I will then focus on how this picture allows us to accurately measure the mass of the black hole and test Einstein’s theory of General Relativity.
Speaker: Dimitrios Psaltis, Univ. of Arizona

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20190422/the-black-hole-shadow-in-the-m87-galaxy

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 04/23/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Simulating the Cosmic Dawn

The upcoming radio telescope SKA is expected to detect the 21-cm signal from the cosmic dawn for the first time, allowing us to probe the astrophysical processes of this previously unobserved era. The 21-cm differential brightness temperature fluctuations from the cosmic dawn are predominantly due to early inhomogeneous heating of the neutral intergalactic medium and variations in Lyman-alpha photon density. Inhomogeneous heating is driven by high energy, X-ray photons which have long mean free paths and thus penetrate deep into the neutral IGM. On the other hand the Lyman-alpha fluctuations depend on the soft, UV radiation from these sources. I will present our large-volume (349,Mpc comoving) suite of fully numerical radiative transfer simulations of this epoch, with a boxsize big enough to make statistically meaningful predictions. The simulations include the effects of helium ionisation, secondary ionisations and multi-frequency photo-heating in order to include different types of X-ray sources (High mass X-ray binaries sources and QSO sources) in addition to black body stellar sources and Lyman-alpha fluctuations, which are added as a post-processing step.

Speaker: Hannah Ross, Lawrence Berkeley Lab

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 04/23/19
03:30 PM – 05:00 PM

Panofsky Auditorium
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road
2575 Sand Hill Road
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Music for the Cosmos: An Exploration of Art & Physics

Art Meets Science at SLAC Lecture Series

A visit to SLAC in October 2018 inspired Nitin Sawhney to create an original audio composition for two short visualization movies on the origins of the universe. At this presentation, he will discuss what inspires him compositionally from a philosophical, universal, theological, anthropological and scientific perspective. Nitin has always been interested in music as a language to explore many different subjects, and he has frequently described his musical journey as a passport to possibility. His strong interest in physics drew him to a collaboration with SLAC, where he was particularly enchanted, mesmerized and fascinated by the simulations of dark matter and ionizing gas. His talk will include the screening of the two short movies in 2D and a conversation with Risa Wechsler, Director, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology.

About the Speaker
Nitin Sawhney is one the most distinctive and versatile musical voices around today, achieving an international reputation across every possible creative medium. With over 20 studio albums to his name, including solo albums, film and soundtracks and compilations along with over 50 film and gaming scores, he has received a substantial wealth of major national and international awards for the work to include the Ivor Novello Lifetime Achievement Award in 2017. Most recently Nitin completed the entire composition of Netflix/Warner’s ‘Mowgli: Legend of the Jungle’ directed by Andy Serkis.

This lecture will be streamed live on our Facebook page a few minutes before the start time.

Admission/Parking
This event is free. Registration is required for non-SLAC employees for site entry. Please complete registration form by April. 22. Parking is limited on SLAC campus.

Website: https://www6.slac.stanford.edu/art-meets-science/music-for-the-cosmos

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 04/23/19
04:30 PM – 05:30 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 201
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Matter made of Light: Mott Insulators and Topological Fluids

Jonathan Simon, Associate Professor of Physics, University of Chicago, will give the Applied Physics/Physics colloquium

Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/matter-made-light-mott-insulators-and-topological-fluids

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 04/23/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Cosmology with Very-High-Energy Gamma-rays

Very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy is typically concerned with standard astrophysical processes, such as particle acceleration and emission mechanisms in gamma-ray sources. However, gamma-ray observations can also be used to study the magnetic fields and low-energy photon fields encountered by the gamma rays as they travel cosmological distances to reach the observer. Two of these fields, the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) and extragalactic background light (EBL), encode information about the early universe and its subsequent evolution. I will present the latest results from VERITAS, a ground-based imaging atmospheric-Cherenkov telescope array sensitive to gamma rays above 85 GeV, on the properties of the EBL and IGMF.

Speaker: Elisa Pueschel (DESY / Zeuthen)

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/cosmology-very-high-energy-gamma-rays

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Tuesday, 4/23/2019
7:00 PM – 9:15 PM

Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Avenue
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Bonestell Documentary.

This documentary reveals that the Golden Gate Bridge, the film “Destination Moon” and America’s space program were all part of the remarkable, nine-decade life and legacy of Chesley Bonestell, “The Father of Space Art,” whose paintings still inspire us today. See: www.chesleybonestell.com.

Chesley Bonestell’s mesmerizing depiction of “Saturn As Seen From Titan” became known as “the painting that launched a thousand careers.” Told by the many people who were influenced by Chesley Bonestell or knew him personally and punctuated with rare interview footage of the artist himself, this two-time Best Documentary award-winning film compellingly chronicles the life of a quiet, artistic visionary, whose architecture and space art continue to inspire us to reach for the stars.

Guest Speakers: Following the screening, a special audience Q&A will take place with Producer/Director/Writer Douglass M. Stewart, Jr., and film participants Rocket Engineer Rocco Lardiere and Photographer Robert E. David.

FREE Admission, open to the public.

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Thursday, 04/25/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
SLAC Fred Kavli Building (51) 3rd Fl Conference Room
2575 Sand Hill Rd
Menlo Park, CA 94305

The Thirty Meter Telescope International Observatory

I will give an overview of TMT, a 30m-aperture, segmented mirror telescope operating with high efficiency over the entire ground-based UV/optical/near-IR window (0.3-28 microns). I will summarize its planned instrumentation suite, its current technical status, and its role as the northern hemisphere arm of the proposed US-ELT Program. Emphasis will be on TMT’s scientific capabilities at first light and beyond, in the context of the future astrophysical landscape, working alongside complementary observational facilities on the ground and in space.

Speaker: Chuck Steidel (Caltech)

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/thirty-meter-telescope-international-observatory

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 04/25/19
06:00 PM – 09:00 PM

Grace Lutheran Church
3201 Ulloa St
San Francisco, CA 94109

Where Bill Gates’ Great Grand-daughter Will Go for Her Honeymoon: The Top Tourist Sights of the Solar System

Using spectacular images from space probes and the world’s largest telescopes, we will explore the most intriguing future “tourist destinations” among the planets and moons in our cosmic neighborhood. Our stops will include the 4,000-mile lava channel on Venus, the towering Mount Olympus volcano on Mars (three times the height of Mount Everest), the awesome Verona Cliffs on the moon Miranda (which are the tallest “lover’s leap” in the solar system), and the recently discovered salt-water steam geysers on Saturn’s intriguing moon Enceladus (nicknamed “Cold Faithful.”)

Speaker: Andrew Fraknoi, Foothill Community College, retired

Time: Social Hour: 6:00 pm, Dinner: 6:45 pm, and Program: 7:45 pm.

To reserve, Send a check for $24 made out to “Sierra Club, SF Bay Chapter” to: Gerry Souzis, 1801 California St., #405, San Francisco, CA 94109. On the check, please put the month of the dinner and the number of people you are paying for. A phone number would be useful in case of some unexpected cancellation. It is most convenient for us to receive your check at least 4 days before the scheduled dinner.

Non-members are welcome. We ask you to bring your own wine or soft drinks. Glasses and ice are available. Let us know if you wish vegetarian dinner.

Contact: Gerry Souzis
Email: gsouzis@hotmail.com

Cost: $24 including dinner

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Thursday, 04/25/19 8:00 PM

Verdi Club
2424 Mariposa St
San Francisco, CA 94110

Wonderfest: Ask a Science Envoy: Black Holes and Making Memories

Wonderfest Science Envoys are early-career researchers with special communication skills and aspirations. Following short talks on provocative modern science topics, these two Science Envoys will answer questions with insight and enthusiasm:

• UC Berkeley astronomer Fatima Abdurrahman debunks sci-fi movie tropes and explains exactly what a black hole is, why they’re so hard to find, and how we can circumvent that difficulty to find them.
• Stanford neuroscientist Tyler Bonnen explores how an experience becomes a memory. He’ll provide a sketch of information processing in the brain – from perceptual encoding to conscious recollection.

Website: http://wonderfest.org/black-holes-making-memories/

Cost: Free

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Friday, 04/26/19
02:30 PM – 03:30 PM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Probing the unidentified Fermi blazar-like population using optical polarization and machine learning

Speaker: Yannis Liodakis

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/probing-unidentified-fermi-blazar-population-using-optical-polarization-and-machine-learning

Cost: Free

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Friday, 04/26/19
06:00 PM – 09:00 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

Teen Night at Chabot

Join us at Chabot for our first ever Teen Night, created by teens for teens. Youth (ages 13-18) and their families are invited to the museum after hours to celebrate teen accomplishments in STEAM and explore involvement opportunities!

About Chabot Teen Night

What originally started as an opportunity for our Teen Galaxy Explorers to showcase their yearly projects has evolved into a full blown, Center-wide celebration of amazing youth work in science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics.

Chabot welcomes teens and families on a Friday night to check out the Galaxy Explorer STEAM Project Showcase, try hands-on activities and demos, catch a Planetarium show, explore the museum, and learn about opportunities with Bay Area teen programs. This event will also feature a DJ, snack bars, and food truck.

Website: https://chabotspace.org/events/events-listing/teen-night/

Cost: $5 General, Free for members

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Friday, April 26, 2019
9:00 PM to 11:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr
San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

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Fri. 04/26/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 04/26/2019 and Sat. 04/27/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri. 04/26/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 04/27/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Sat. 04/27/2019
Sunset: 7:54 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive
San Carlos, CA

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset… In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

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Saturday, 04/27/19 5:00 PM

Fujitsu Planetarium at De Anza College
21250 Stevens Creek Blvd
(by parking lot E)
Cupertino, CA 95014

Explore Live! – Flight to the Edge of the Universe

The De Anza College Planetarium will present “Explore Live!” – a live astronomy series featuring presentations by our professional planetarium staff.

Website: http://www.deanza.edu/planetarium/#Explorelive

Cost: $9

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Sunday, 04/28/19 3:00 PM

ExplOratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

Full-Spectrum Science with Ron Hipschman: Sound

What is sound? How high a pitch can you hear? Can you measure the speed of sound with a yardstick? Can two sounds add up to no sound? Explore these questions and more in this resonant presentation.

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/full-spectrum-science-ron-hipschman-sound-4-28-2019

Cost: Free with admission

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Monday, 04/29/19
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
2575 Sand Hill Rd, Building 51
Kavli Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

New results from Cold Dark Matter Search experiment at low-mass
Speaker: Matt Pyle, UC Berkeley

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/new-results-cold-dark-matter-search-experiment-low-mass

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/29/19
04:15 PM – 05:15 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Visiting Newton’s Atelier Before the Principia, 1679-1684

Newton’s Principia ignited the Scientific Revolution, but the work-sheets showing how he composed his masterpiece have been lost. Fortunately, he left behind enough clues that make it possible to give a plausible reconstruction how he did it. Surprisingly, such a reconstruction has not been attempted before. In the winter of 1679, Robert Hooke initiated a correspondence with Newton outlining the physics of planetary motion. But Hooke was unable to formulate his concepts in mathematical form, and afterwards Newton accomplished this formulation which allowed him to give a geometrical expression for the passage of time, thus laying the foundations for the Principia. On Dec 10, 1684, four months after a visit of Edmond Halley, Newton sent the first manuscripts for the Principia to the London Royal Society, which he had made “designedly abstruse to be understood only be able Mathematicians”. This lack of clarity remains up to the present time. In this talk, I will show, however, that with a pencil and a ruler, and without any calculus, good approximations of orbits for central forces can be calculated graphically that also clarify the content of the Principia.

Speaker: Michael Nauenberg, UC Santa Cruz

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20190429/visiting-newtons-atelier-before-the-principia-1679-1684

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 05/02/19
06:00 PM – 10:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

NightLife in Space: The Moon

NightLife goes to the Moon and back, exploring the origins of space travel and the future of lunar missions. Plus, MUTEK.SF presents A/Visions 1 in the planetarium, featuring full dome video art and live music performances and DJ sets.

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/nightlife/nightlife-in-space-the-moon

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members

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Thursday, 05/02/19
07:30 PM – 10:00 PM

Astronomy Night
Campbell Hall
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Astro Night: Who Ordered This? A Tale of Cold War Satellites, Microwave Ovens, and Little Green Men in the Story of Discovering the Unexpected

Speaker: Ben Margalit, UC Berkeley

Stargazing after the lecture, 8:30 pm – 10:00pm

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/i/astro-night

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 05/03/19 7:00 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Journey to the Moon With NASA

As NASA, the nation, and the world prepare to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first human landing on the Moon, we will examine NASA’s missions of lunar exploration. We will review the missions that led to Apollo as well as the six individual Apollo missions, explore missions that came after Apollo, and finally look ahead to what’s in store for future lunar exploration.
After the talk, you’ll have a chance to touch an actual piece of the Moon!

Speaker: Brian Day, NASA

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/meetings.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 05/03/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 05/03/2019 and Sat. 05/04/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 05/03/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 05/04/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Monday, 05/06/19
07:30 PM – 09:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

A Billion Stars Reveal the Milky Way as You’ve Never Seen It Before

The Gaia space telescope recently released its second catalog of over 1.3 billion stellar distances, which is helping astronomers map the Milky Way like never before. Jackie Faherty will guide you through cutting-edge visualizations of the most spectacular astronomical dataset of our time – a virtual tour of hundreds of millions of stars, highlighting the revolutionary scientific progress that astronomers have accomplished in the one short year since the data was released. You’ll be immersed in the measured motions and distances of over a billion stars, revealing the history of our galaxy, from recent stellar flybys to long ago Milky Way mergers.

Speaker: Jackie Faherty, American Museum of Natural History

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/a-billion-stars-reveal-the-milky-way-as-youve-never-seen-it

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

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