Bay Astro – Events of Week of 04/29/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
==================================

Monday, 04/29/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Large-scale intrinsic alignments of dark matter halo orientations with velocity field

The kinematic Sunyaev-Zel’dovich effect enables us to directly probe the density-weighted velocity field up to very large cosmic scales. We investigate the effects of intrinsic alignments (IA) of dark-matter halo shapes on cosmic density and velocity fields on such large scales. In literature IA have been detected with the halo density field up to ~ 100 Mpc/h both in simulations and observations. In this paper we introduce the corresponding various velocity statistics, the (density-weighted) velocity-intrinsic ellipticity (VI) correlation, angle-binned pairwise infall momentum and momentum correlation function. We derive theoretical expressions for these velocity alignment statistics for the first time based on the linear alignment model. Using large-volume, high-resolution N-body simulations, we measure the alignment statistics of density and velocity. Behaviors of IA in the velocity statistics are similar to those in the density statistics, except that the halo orientations are aligned with the velocity field up to scales larger than those with the density field, r > 100Mpc/h. We show that the detected IA of the velocity field can be well predicted by the linear alignment model. Our results indicate that observations of IA with the velocity field on large scales can provide additional information on cosmological models.
Speaker: Teppei Okumura (ASIAA)

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/large-scale-intrinsic-alignments-dark-matter-halo-orientations-velocity-field

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 04/29/19 1:30 PM

Room 1011
Evans Hall
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Artificial Intelligence, from Astronomy to Interior Design and Back Again

This week, computational cosmologist Miguel Aragon-Calvo will share his thoughts on how the interdisciplinary aspects of Artificial Intelligence offer a unique opportunity for academic researchers to apply their expertise in real world applications. He will talk about his experience as an AI startup consultant and how this has helped broaden his perspectives as a scientist.

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 04/29/19
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
2575 Sand Hill Rd, Building 51
Kavli Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Searching for Dark Matter with Athermal Phonon Detectors Throughout the Mass Range from 50meV through 500MeV

Substantial astronomical observations have established that approximately 25% of the energy density of the universe is composed of cold non-baryonic dark matter, whose detection and characterization could be key to improving our understanding of the laws of physics. Over the past three decades, physicists have largely focused on searching for dark matter within the 10 GeV-1 TeV range (WIMPs), unfortunately without success. These failures have motivated the DOE to broaden the experimental search program with the very recently announced $24M Dark Matter New Initiatives Program.

In this talk, we’ll discuss the experimental requirements when searching for dark matter throughout the mass range from 50meV- 500 MeV. We’ll also discuss recent R&D breakthroughs in athermal phonon sensor technology that will enable experiments that are being proposed using silicon, polar crystal and superfluid He as the detector material.

Speaker: Matt Pyle, UC Berkeley

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/searching-for-dark-matter-athermal-phonon-detectors-throughout-the-mass-range-50mev-through

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 04/29/19
04:15 PM – 05:15 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Visiting Newton’s Atelier Before the Principia, 1679-1684

Newton’s Principia ignited the Scientific Revolution, but the work-sheets showing how he composed his masterpiece have been lost. Fortunately, he left behind enough clues that make it possible to give a plausible reconstruction how he did it. Surprisingly, such a reconstruction has not been attempted before. In the winter of 1679, Robert Hooke initiated a correspondence with Newton outlining the physics of planetary motion. But Hooke was unable to formulate his concepts in mathematical form, and afterwards Newton accomplished this formulation which allowed him to give a geometrical expression for the passage of time, thus laying the foundations for the Principia. On Dec 10, 1684, four months after a visit of Edmond Halley, Newton sent the first manuscripts for the Principia to the London Royal Society, which he had made “designedly abstruse to be understood only be able Mathematicians”. This lack of clarity remains up to the present time. In this talk, I will show, however, that with a pencil and a ruler, and without any calculus, good approximations of orbits for central forces can be calculated graphically that also clarify the content of the Principia.

Speaker: Michael Nauenberg, UC Santa Cruz

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20190429/visiting-newtons-atelier-before-the-principia-1679-1684

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 04/30/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Constraining axion physics with small-scale CMB measurements
Speaker: Renee Hlozek (Dunlap Institute, University of Toronto)

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/constraining-axion-physics-small-scale-cmb-measurements

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 04/30/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Using Artificial Intelligence for hypothesis testing and physical insight extraction

Artificial Intelligence techniques excel at predicting values or classifications based on complex training data. However, they do so as a “black box” and often offer no new insight on the physical processes behind the data. In this talk I will discuss uses of AI in which our focus is in obtaining a better understanding of the physical processes involved in generating the data in contrast to standard applications where the goal is minimizing the cost function. I will show research my group is doing on galaxy distance estimations, Large Scale Structure and galaxy formation.

Speaker: Miguel Aragon-Calvo, UNAM

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 04/30/19
06:00 PM – 07:00 PM

The Patio
412 Emerson St
Palo Alto, CA 94301

What on earth do Maseratis, ice hockey and corgi puppies have to do with telescopes?

Join us for the second SLAC on Tap in Palo Alto. SLAC engineer Margaux Lopez will chat about what on earth Maseratis, ice hockey and corgi puppies have to do with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Have a drink, find out more about telescopes, and learn how to build a mini three-axis telescope out of Dixie cups.

Speaker : Margaux Lopez

Margaux Lopez is a SLAC engineer who has been toiling away (mostly voluntarily) in the dungeons of SLAC for the past three and a half years. Her primary goal is engineering the heck out of a fancypants camera destined for the mountains of Chile, and her secondary goal is telling anyone who will listen how cool it is (and how many corgi puppies would fit inside).

Website: https://www6.slac.stanford.edu/slac-on-tap/what-earth-do-maseratis-ice-hockey-and-corgi-puppies-have-do-telescopes

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 05/02/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Physics and Astrophysics Building Room 102/103
452 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

SPHEREx: An all-sky near infrared spectral survey

Recently selected for implementation as the next medium-class mission in NASA’s Explorer line, SPHEREx will produce a Near Infrared spectrum for every 6 arcsecond pixel on the celestial sphere. Through the use of cold. wide-field optics combined with linear variable filters, this experiment is optimized to probe for signatures of inflation, imprinted on the large scale structure of the Universe. Key science goals also include surveying the Milky Way for water and other biogenic ices, as well as tracing the history of cosmic light production through fluctuation studies of the NIR background. In this talk I’ll provide an overview of the mission, with a focus on the instrument and mission design.

Speaker: Phil Corngut, Cornell

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/spherex-all-sky-near-infrared-spectral-survey

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 05/02/19
06:00 PM – 10:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

NightLife in Space: The Moon

NightLife goes to the Moon and back, exploring the origins of space travel and the future of lunar missions. Plus, MUTEK.SF presents A/Visions 1 in the planetarium, featuring full dome video art and live music performances and DJ sets.

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/nightlife/nightlife-in-space-the-moon

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members

==================================

Thursday, 05/02/19
07:30 PM – 10:00 PM

Astronomy Night
Campbell Hall
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Astro Night: Who Ordered This? A Tale of Cold War Satellites, Microwave Ovens, and Little Green Men in the Story of Discovering the Unexpected

Speaker: Ben Margalit, UC Berkeley

Stargazing after the lecture, 8:30 pm – 10:00pm

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/i/astro-night

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 05/03/19 7:00 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Journey to the Moon With NASA

As NASA, the nation, and the world prepare to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first human landing on the Moon, we will examine NASA’s missions of lunar exploration. We will review the missions that led to Apollo as well as the six individual Apollo missions, explore missions that came after Apollo, and finally look ahead to what’s in store for future lunar exploration.
After the talk, you’ll have a chance to touch an actual piece of the Moon!

Speaker: Brian Day, NASA

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/meetings.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 05/03/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 05/03/2019 and Sat. 05/04/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 05/03/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 05/04/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Sat. 05/04/2019
Sunset:8:01 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive
San Carlos, CA

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset… In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

==================================

Monday, 05/06/19
12:10 PM – 01:00 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Missing Red Supergiants and Carbon Burning
Speaker: Tuguldur Sukhbold, OSU

Website: http://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 05/06/19
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
Panofsky Auditorium
2575 Sand Hill Road
Menlo Park, CA 94025

From nonlinear optics to high-intensity laser physics

The laser increased the intensity of light that can be generated by orders of magnitude and thus brought about nonlinear optical interactions with matter. Chirped pulse amplification, also known as CPA, changed the intensity level by a few more orders of magnitude and helped usher in a new type of laser-matter interaction that is referred to as high-intensity laser physics. In this talk, I will discuss the dierences between nonlinear optics and high-intensity laser physics. The development of CPA and why short, intense laser pulses can cut transparent material will also be included. I will also discuss future applications.

Speaker: Donna Strickland, Univ. of Waterloo, co-recipient of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics

Editor’s Note: This lecture will also be given on May 7 at the Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 201

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/nonlinear-optics-high-intensity-laser-physics

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 05/06/19
07:30 PM – 09:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

A Billion Stars Reveal the Milky Way as You’ve Never Seen It Before

The Gaia space telescope recently released its second catalog of over 1.3 billion stellar distances, which is helping astronomers map the Milky Way like never before. Jackie Faherty will guide you through cutting-edge visualizations of the most spectacular astronomical dataset of our time – a virtual tour of hundreds of millions of stars, highlighting the revolutionary scientific progress that astronomers have accomplished in the one short year since the data was released. You’ll be immersed in the measured motions and distances of over a billion stars, revealing the history of our galaxy, from recent stellar flybys to long ago Milky Way mergers.

Speaker: Jackie Faherty, American Museum of Natural History

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/a-billion-stars-reveal-the-milky-way-as-youve-never-seen-it

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

==================================

Tuesday, 05/07/19 4:00 PM

Room LBL 50-5132
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
1 Cyclotron Road
Berkeley, CA 94720

Particle Physics & Astrophysics with Wide Field mm-Wave Surveys

There have now been several generations of wide-field mm-wave surveys, with several ongoing and upcoming very ambitious projects. We have already learned a great deal about the early universe and put strong constraints on particle physics extensions to the standard model, also collecting large catalogs of strong gravitational lens systems and massive clusters of galaxies, and learning a great deal about the growth of large scale structure in the universe. Ongoing and future experiments will continue to probe the early universe, collect larger catalogs of interesting lenses and clusters, and more carefully chart large scale structure, while also opening new windows on solar system science, transient events, and multi messenger astronomy. These surveys are more widely known as “cosmic microwave background experiments.”

Speaker: Gil Holder, UIUC

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 05/07/19
04:30 PM – 05:30 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 201
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

From Nonlinear Optics to High-Intensity Laser Physics

Professor Donna Strickland (University of Waterloo), co-recipient of the 2018 Physics Nobel Prize, will give the Applied Physics/Physics colloquium.

Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/nonlinear-optics-high-intensity-laser-physics

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 05/09/19
06:00 PM – 10:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

NightLife in Space: Other Earths

Other Earths are out there, and tonight, NightLife brings in experts to talk about the missions and spacecrafts currently on the search for exoplanets and life beyond Earth.

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/nightlife/nightlife-in-space-other-earths

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members

==================================

Friday, 05/10/19 12:00 PM

Earth and Marine Sciences Building
UC Santa Cruz
Room A340
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

Volatiles in the Martian Interior

Speaker: Justin Filiberto, Lunar and Planetary Institute

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/spring-2019.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, May 10, 2019
9:15 PM to 11:15 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr.
San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 05/10/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 05/10/2019 and Sat. 05/11/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 05/10/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 05/11/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 05/11/19 8:00 PM

Cushing Memorial (‘Mountain’) Amphitheater
Mt Tamalpais State Park
Pan Toll Road and Ridgecrest Blvd
Mill Valley, CA 94941

The Largest 3D Maps of Our Universe

The last century has seen a revolution in our understanding of the cosmos, including its age – 13.8 billion years – and content: 95% dark matter & dark energy; 5% normal matter! To test cosmology theories and to grasp how stars and galaxies formed, UC Berkeley collaborates world-wide to make huge 3D maps of hydrogen, the most abundant cosmic element.

Speaker: Josh Dillon, UC Berkeley

Website: http://www.friendsofmttam.org/astronomy/schedule

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 05/11/19
08:30 PM – 10:30 PM

College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Jazz Under the Stars

Come peer through our telescopes and see craters on the Moon, the visible planets, star clusters, and more while we listen to CSM’s very own KCSM Jazz 91 FM. Dress warmly. Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5. Directions are available on the Maps, Directions & Parking page.

Website: http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/astronomy/jazz.asp

Cost: Free

==================================

Sunday, 05/12/19
07:30 PM – 10:30 PM

City Star Parties – Point Lobos Parking Lot
El Camino Del Mar
San Francisco, CA 94121

San Francisco City Star Party @ Point Lobos, San Francisco, CA

Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.
Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/events/cat_ids~55/%22%3e%20City%20Star%20Parties/

Cost: Free

Written by

No Comments Yet.

Leave a Reply