Bay Astro – Events of Week of 05/06/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Monday, 05/06/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Towards Weak Lensing Cosmology with WFIRST Near-Infrared Detectors

The Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) is an upcoming NASA observatory that will investigate the origins of cosmic acceleration using weak gravitational lensing. WFIRST will perform galaxy shape measurements using Teledyne H4RG-10 detectors; thus it is essential to understand inter-pixel non-linear effects like the brighter-fatter effect (BFE) and non-linear inter-pixel capacitance (NL-IPC) that could cause systematic errors in the lensing analysis. The non-destructive readout capability of the H4RG-10 detectors enables correlation measurements on flat field data not only between pixels but also between time frames. In this talk, I will present a correlation analysis of laboratory flat field data for one of the WFIRST prototype detectors in which we find a statistically significant correlation signal due to non-linear detector effects. We leverage the time dimension of this data set to perform some tests that suggest that the BFE is the dominant mechanism. The flat field statistics continue to provide a wealth of information that will eventually help us calibrate WFIRST data and obtain accurate cosmological parameters.

Speaker: Ami Choi, The Ohio State University

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/towards-weak-lensing-cosmology-wfirst-near-infrared-detectors

Cost: Free

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Monday, 05/06/19
12:10 PM – 01:00 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Missing Red Supergiants and Carbon Burning
Speaker: Tuguldur Sukhbold, OSU

Website: http://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/

Cost: Free

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Monday, 05/06/19
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
Panofsky Auditorium
2575 Sand Hill Road
Menlo Park, CA 94025

From nonlinear optics to high-intensity laser physics

The laser increased the intensity of light that can be generated by orders of magnitude and thus brought about nonlinear optical interactions with matter. Chirped pulse amplification, also known as CPA, changed the intensity level by a few more orders of magnitude and helped usher in a new type of laser-matter interaction that is referred to as high-intensity laser physics. In this talk, I will discuss the dierences between nonlinear optics and high-intensity laser physics. The development of CPA and why short, intense laser pulses can cut transparent material will also be included. I will also discuss future applications.

Speaker: Donna Strickland, Univ. of Waterloo, co-recipient of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics

Editor’s Note: This lecture will also be given on Tues., May 7 at the Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 201

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/nonlinear-optics-high-intensity-laser-physics

Cost: Free

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Monday, 05/06/19
07:30 PM – 09:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

A Billion Stars Reveal the Milky Way as You’ve Never Seen It Before

The Gaia space telescope recently released its second catalog of over 1.3 billion stellar distances, which is helping astronomers map the Milky Way like never before. Jackie Faherty will guide you through cutting-edge visualizations of the most spectacular astronomical dataset of our time – a virtual tour of hundreds of millions of stars, highlighting the revolutionary scientific progress that astronomers have accomplished in the one short year since the data was released. You’ll be immersed in the measured motions and distances of over a billion stars, revealing the history of our galaxy, from recent stellar flybys to long ago Milky Way mergers.

Speaker: Jackie Faherty, American Museum of Natural History

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/a-billion-stars-reveal-the-milky-way-as-youve-never-seen-it

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

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Tuesday, 05/07/19 4:00 PM

Room LBL 50-5132
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
1 Cyclotron Road
Berkeley, CA 94720

Particle Physics & Astrophysics with Wide Field mm-Wave Surveys

There have now been several generations of wide-field mm-wave surveys, with several ongoing and upcoming very ambitious projects. We have already learned a great deal about the early universe and put strong constraints on particle physics extensions to the standard model, also collecting large catalogs of strong gravitational lens systems and massive clusters of galaxies, and learning a great deal about the growth of large scale structure in the universe. Ongoing and future experiments will continue to probe the early universe, collect larger catalogs of interesting lenses and clusters, and more carefully chart large scale structure, while also opening new windows on solar system science, transient events, and multi messenger astronomy. These surveys are more widely known as “cosmic microwave background experiments.”

Speaker: Gil Holder, UIUC

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 05/07/19
04:30 PM – 05:30 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 201
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

From Nonlinear Optics to High-Intensity Laser Physics

Professor Donna Strickland (University of Waterloo), co-recipient of the 2018 Physics Nobel Prize, will give the Applied Physics/Physics colloquium.

Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/nonlinear-optics-high-intensity-laser-physics

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 05/09/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Varian Physics Building, Room 355
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Cosmic neutrinos: using the universe as our laboratory

Cosmological measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation, and of the large-scale distribution of galaxies, have taught us a great deal about the origins and content of the universe. In the next decade we anticipate using new microwave background data, and new measurements of the positions, masses and gravitational distortions of galaxies and galaxy clusters, to better understand neutrino particles. I will discuss our path to making an indirect detection of the sum of neutrino masses using astronomical data, which will complement direct laboratory measurements. This will progress from using current data, including the Planck satellite, to new measurements coming from Chile with the Simons Observatory and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. I will also describe how non-standard neutrino interactions might alleviate the current Hubble Constant tension between CMB and local measurements.

Speaker: Jo Dunkley, Princeton

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/cosmic-neutrinos-using-universe-our-laboratory

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 05/09/19
06:00 PM – 10:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

NightLife in Space: Other Earths

Other Earths are out there, and tonight, NightLife brings in experts to talk about the missions and spacecrafts currently on the search for exoplanets and life beyond Earth.

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/nightlife/nightlife-in-space-other-earths

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members

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Friday, 05/10/19 12:00 PM

Earth and Marine Sciences Building
UC Santa Cruz
Room A340
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

Volatiles in the Martian Interior

Speaker: Justin Filiberto, Lunar and Planetary Institute

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/spring-2019.html

Cost: Free

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Friday, May 10, 2019
9:15 PM to 11:15 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr.
San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

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Fri. 05/10/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 05/10/2019 and Sat. 05/11/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 05/10/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 05/11/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 05/11/19 8:00 PM

Cushing Memorial (‘Mountain’) Amphitheater
Mt Tamalpais State Park
Pan Toll Road and Ridgecrest Blvd
Mill Valley, CA 94941

The Largest 3D Maps of Our Universe

The last century has seen a revolution in our understanding of the cosmos, including its age – 13.8 billion years – and content: 95% dark matter & dark energy; 5% normal matter! To test cosmology theories and to grasp how stars and galaxies formed, UC Berkeley collaborates world-wide to make huge 3D maps of hydrogen, the most abundant cosmic element.

Speaker: Josh Dillon, UC Berkeley

Website: http://www.friendsofmttam.org/astronomy/schedule

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 05/11/19
08:30 PM – 10:30 PM

College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Jazz Under the Stars

Come peer through our telescopes and see craters on the Moon, the visible planets, star clusters, and more while we listen to CSM’s very own KCSM Jazz 91 FM. Dress warmly. Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5. Directions are available on the Maps, Directions & Parking page.

Website: http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/astronomy/jazz.asp

Cost: Free

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Sunday, 05/12/19
07:30 PM – 10:30 PM

City Star Parties – Point Lobos Parking Lot
El Camino Del Mar
San Francisco, CA 94121

San Francisco City Star Party @ Point Lobos, San Francisco, CA

Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.
Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/events/cat_ids~55/%22%3e%20City%20Star%20Parties/

Cost: Free

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Monday, 05/13/19
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
2575 Sand Hill Rd, Building 51
Kavli Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Fundamental Physics with Antihydrogen Atoms – Rescheduled

The ALPHA Collaboration at CERN has combined antiprotons and positrons to create and probe antihydrogen atoms. ALPHA can now store over 1000 antihydrogen atoms at a time for thousands of seconds. We have developed techniques to conduct precision physics using minimal numbers of antiatoms. The comparison of antihydrogen and hydrogen spectra are sensitive probes of Charge-Parity-Time (CPT) Symmetry. We have conducted the first precision physics experiments on antihydrogen, measuring the 1S-2S and the hyperfine transition bandwidths to the 10kHz level. The charge of antihydrogen has been limited to less than 0.7ppb of the magnitude of the electron charge, and the Lyman-alpha transition, critical for laser cooling, has been excited. A gravity experiment designed to measure antihydrogen acceleration in the Earth’s field to 1% accuracy is being constructed. In this talk I will describe ALPHAs techniques, physics results, and our plans for the future.

Speaker: Johathan Wurtele, UC Berkeley

This event was originally scheduled for April 15.

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/fundamental-physics-antihydrogen-atoms

Cost: Free

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Monday, 05/13/19
06:00 PM – 07:15 PM

Commonwealth Club
110 The Embarcadero
San Francisco, CA 94105

What Is Real? The Unfinished Quest for the Meaning of Quantum Physics

Monday Night Philosophy and almost all physicists agree that quantum mechanics is among humanity’s finest scientific achievements. But ask what it means, and the result will be a not-so-scientific brawl. For a century, most physicists have followed Niels Bohr’s Copenhagen interpretation and dismissed questions about the reality underlying quantum physics as meaningless. That is why, even though it is a mishmash of solipsism and poor reasoning, the Copenhagen interpretation has endured, with Bohr’s students vigorously protecting his legacy, and the physics community favoring practical experiments over philosophical arguments. As a result, questioning the status quo has almost always meant professional ruin. And yet, from the 1920s to today, physicists such as John Bell, David Bohm and Hugh Everett persisted in seeking the true meaning of quantum mechanics. Join us – first for the gripping story of this battle of ideas and the courageous scientists who dared to stand up for seeking truth, and then for reexamining the littered trail of half-understood research results in the never-discarded quest for answering the fundamental questions that can be summed up as: “What is real?”

Speaker: Adam Becker, Author

Website: https://www.commonwealthclub.org/events/2019-05-13/what-real-unfinished-quest-meaning-quantum-physics

If you cannot make it to this event, a prior iteration of this talk delivered at Google is on YouTube at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u2K9Mobldtw

Cost: $20 General, $10 Members, $8 Students

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Tuesday, 05/14/19
04:30 PM – 05:30 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 201
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Physicists and Evolution: Puzzles and Expectations
Speaker: Daniel Fisher, Stanford

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/physicists-and-evolution-puzzles-and-expectations

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 05/14/19 7:00 PM

Cemex Auditorium
641 Knight Way
Zambrano Hall/North Building
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

The Signs of Time: Leonardo’s History of the Earth and the Faith of Man

Based on insightful observations and daring hypotheses, Leonardo da Vinci was among the first to hold that Earth has a long history marked by continuous transformations. In his view, these changes could create environmental conditions that would make life of humans and animals impossible. This talk will explore Leonardo’s understanding of the geocosm in his notebooks, including the Codex Leicester. Where did Leonardo get his ideas about nature and time, and how did they evolve?

Speaker: Paolo Galluzzi, Museo Galileo, Florence, Italy

Website: https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/events/detail/20183_EVT-594

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 05/15/19 11:00 AM

Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
7700 Sandholdt Rd.
Moss Landing, CA 95039

Air, land, sea, and space: Open source robot tools for all

Developing and deploying robots is hard, and harder still when the robots are sent to far-off places where they cannot be easily helped or serviced. Open Robotics aims to ease that difficulty through the use of high-quality open-source software for robot programming, simulation, and testing. In this seminar, Brian Gerkey will introduce two widely used open source tools, “ROS (Robot Operating System) and Gazebo”and show how they have been applied to a wide variety of challenging robot applications, both on Earth and elsewhere.

Brian Gerkey, Open Robotics

Website: https://www.mbari.org/gerkey-brian-seminar/

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 05/15/19 7:00 PM

Silicon Valley Astronomy Lecture Series
Foothill College
Smithwick Theater
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Charon, Pluto’s Companion: What We’re Learning from New Horizons

Pluto’s large moon Charon turned out to be far more interesting than astronomers expected. Pluto was the star of the New Horizons show, but the features on Charon’s surface tell a fascinating tale of how icy worlds could form far from the gravitational influences of the giant planets. There is evidence of a world-wide sub-surface ocean early on, and of global expansion as that ocean froze solid. Charon’s surface also has a region of plains where icy materials may once have flowed and smoothed over the fractures present elsewhere on its surface. Dr. Beyer will be your guide through this story of formation and change in the frozen reaches of the outer Solar System./p>

Speaker: Dr. Ross Beyer, SETI Institute

Website: https://www.foothill.edu/astronomy/

Cost: Free ($3 parking)

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Wednesday, 15 May 2019, 7:30 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum Theater
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114

“Exploring the Final Frontier with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope”

by
Phil Marshall, PhD, SLAC, Deputy Director, LSST Operations

Currently under construction in Chile, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will survey the entire visible southern sky every few days for a decade – the widest, fastest, and deepest view of the night sky ever observed. LSST’s vast archive of data will dramatically advance our knowledge of the dark energy and dark matter that make up 95 percent of the Universe, as well as galaxy formation and potentially hazardous asteroids.

Much of the data archive will be available not only to professional scientists, but also to educators, students, amateur astronomers and members of the public interested in participating in “citizen science” projects. This remarkable new machine will give us a new way of doing astronomy – and invites us to think about what we mean by exploring the heavens, why we do it, and what we can all learn.

Brief Bio
Phil Marshall is a staff scientist at SLAC, and Deputy Director of Operations for the LSST. His science interests lie in using strong gravitational lenses to make accurate measurements of cosmological distance, in order to pin down the accelerating expansion of the Universe. This is his third stint at Stanford, having been there twice as a postcdoctoral research fellow. Phil got his PhD from Cambridge in the UK, and has been enjoying life in California since moving out here in 2003.

Tickets are free; non-SFAA members should bring their Eventbrite ticket for admission to the Randall Theater. Click here to obtain an Eventbrite ticket.

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/monthly_lectures/randall/

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Thursday, 05/16/19
06:00 PM – 10:00 PM

ExplOratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

After Dark: The MAX Festival

Kick off the inaugural MAX (Media, Arts, Exploration) Festival at the Exploratorium as we celebrate humanity’s modern frontier: space. Illuminating scientific exploration through artistic expression and shared experiences, the MAX Festival has gathered local and international artists who explore the new space age.

Space Travel Sci-Fi Style
With Sarah Hotchkiss
7:00 p.m. | Osher Gallery 1, Kanbar Forum

Come fly with us where ‘man’ has never gone before: in this playful talk, we’ll watch clips from sci-fi films both thought-provoking and ridiculous, test our knowledge of space travel, and determine which fictions of the future we might like to bring into being.

Heisenberg
With Janani Balasubramanian
7:15 p.m. | Gallery 5

Heisenberg is a large-group augmented-reality game exploring uncertainty, precision, and chaos. Participants start at the beginning of the universe and move through a series of matter/energy transformations, each emphasizing limits on personal understanding – a cue from particle physics and the game’s namesake, the Heisenberg uncertainty principle.

Everything Matters: Strontium
With Ron Hipschman
8:00 p.m. | Fisher Bay Observatory Gallery 6

The soft, reactive metal strontium makes toys glow in the dark, helped made the TV revolution possible, and sometimes sneaks into our bones – harmlessly, unless it’s the radioactive isotope strontium-90. Absorb the past, present, and possible future of strontium with Exploratorium scientist and raconteur Ron Hipschman.

Robots as Our Partners/Pas De Deux
Talk and Performance
8:30 p.m. | Osher Gallery 1, Kanbar Forum

Engage with a pas de deux like you’ve never seen before, one created by the interaction between dancer-choreographer Alice Sheppard and a robot ‘inspired’ by Alex Reben. As an introduction to robots as our avatars, Sasha Samochine of Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Visual Operations Lab will introduce the robots JPL has trekking through the solar system, from Mars to Jupiter. Take it all in and imagine the ways technology reflects and interrogates our humanity.

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/after-dark-may-16-2019-0

Cost: $17.95 advance, $19.95 at the door

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Thursday, 05/16/19
06:00 PM – 10:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

NightLife in Space: Cosmos

Get trippy as NightLife travels far out to the ends of the observable universe with a dive into some of the greatest cosmic mysteries of our time, from the Fermi paradox to the multiverse and dark matter to dark energy.

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/nightlife/nightlife-in-space-cosmos

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members

==================================

Friday, 05/17/19 12:00 PM

Earth and Marine Sciences Building
UC Santa Cruz
Room A340
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

Aluminum-26 chronology of dust coagulation and early Solar System evolution

Speaker: Ming-Chang Liu, UCLA

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/spring-2019.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 05/17/19 7:00 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers
1893 N. Vasco Rd
Unitarian Universalist Church
Livermore, CA 94551

NGC/IC Project — Cleaning up errors in a 130 year-old catalogue

Spealker: Steve Gottlieb

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 05/17/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 05/17/2019 and Sat. 05/18/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 05/17/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 05/18/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 05/18/19
07:00 PM – 09:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

Your Place in the Universe: Understanding Our Big, Messy Existence

Our universe changes every day. It was different in the past, and it will be different in the future. This is something we just learned about a hundred years ago, and we’re still wrestling with the implications. Including, but not limited to, the fact that someday no more stars will shine.

Speaker: Paul Sutter, Author

Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/261129419/
Cost: Free

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