Bay Astro – Events of Week of 06/17/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Monday, 06/17/19
01:00 PM – 03:00 PM

Berkeley Public Library Clarement Branch
2940 Benvenue
Berkeley, CA 94705

Space Phantasy Cartooning @Claremont

Graphic novelist and art mentor, Aaron Southerland, will hold a series of cartooning vibe sessions focused on outer space. The sessions are dedicated to the artsy students who desire to create and continue working on their own cartoon and comic characters. Aaron will provide guidance on drawing techniques using a variety of drawing materials.
Ideal for Grades 5-8.

Website: https://www.berkeleypubliclibrary.org/events/summer-cartooning-space-phantasy-claremont

Cost: Free

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Monday, 06/17/19
02:00 PM – 03:00 PM

Room 101X
Paul G Allen Building
330 Serra Mall
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Direct detection and characterization of exoplanets

Direct imaging is a method to detect and study extra solar planets, which consists of spatially resolving the light of the planet from the light of the star around which it is orbiting. The method is currently sensitive to young gas giant exoplanets that still radiate the heat from their formation, at orbital separation similar to the gas giants in our solar system. A recurring theme in this work is the application of maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference to the detection and characterization of directly imaged planets. In particular, I have designed and implemented the planet detection scheme for the Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey, which is a 600-star direct-imaging survey spanning 2014-2018. In addition to improving the statistical standards of the field, the detection limits set by this work have allowed the derivation of planet occurrence rates for giant planets and informed their formation history. Additionally, I have demonstrated how Bayesian inference can be used to constrain the mass of undetected exoplanets, in particular those potentially carving the gaps of proto-planetary disks, which is the disk of orbiting gas a dust from which planets form. Finally, I developed a statistical framework for the analysis of medium resolution spectroscopic data, which I have used to characterize the planets orbiting the star HR 8799. In 2008, HR 8799 b,c, and d were the first exoplanets, and is still the only multi-planet system, that have been directly imaged. From these data, I derived the first radial velocity measurement of HR 8799 b and c and measured water and carbon monoxide in the atmosphere of HR 8799 d for the first time.

Speaker: Jean-Baptiste Ruffio, Stanford

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/direct-detection-and-characterization-exoplanets

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 06/18/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Maximally constraining dark energy

In this talk I will sketch how combining observational bounds from cosmology with insights from theoretical particle physics allows us to test gravity with unprecedented precision, in particular zooming in on the nature of dark energy. In doing so, I will highlight the interplay between gravitational wave constraints on gravity post-GW170817, data constraints from cosmic microwave background and galaxy clustering measurements, and theoretical priors on such theories from requiring them to be stable and well-defined.

Speaker: Johannes Noller (ETH Zurich)

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/maximally-constraining-dark-energy

Cost: Free

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Next event (Weekly): June 18, 2019 – 1:00pm-2:15pm View all dates
Claremont Branch
Tuesdays at 1pm June 11th & 18th, July 9th & 16th

Berkeley Public Library Clarement Branch
2940 Benvenue
Berkeley, CA 94705

Ever look up at the night sky and wonder what’s all that up there? Have you been following the news about the black hole and the event horizon and would like to understand more about these phenomena and other Astronomy concepts? Join us and get a download on what’s hot in Astronomy via bite-size presentations by local scientists, grad students, and science hobbyists (citizen scientists). Everyone welcome.

Schedule for June 18th:

“Stories About People Who Build Telescopes” by Deepthi Gorthi, UC Berkeley Astronomy

“What Flashes of X-rays Tell Us About Neutron Stars” by Don Willcox, UC Berkeley Astronomy

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Wed. June 19, 2019 7:30 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum Theater
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA

“Seeing Our Universe in New Ways – the Infrared Sky Re-Imagined”

Kimberly Ennico Smith, PhD, Research Scientist, NASA Ames

Studies of our universe through multi-wavelength “eyes”, enabled by placing telescopes on mountain tops, on airplanes, on balloons, to rockets and satellites in orbit, has revealed a beautiful, mystifying, dynamic, and rather extraordinary place.
Our Earth’s atmosphere no longer became a limiting filter to our observing the light emitted, absorbed, and reflected from the universe in which we live.
Infrared light, in particular, by penetrating deep into dark clouds allows us to capture the birth of stars. Through sensing colder temperatures, we use infrared light to measure the re-emission of the dust left behind by violent supernovae stellar deaths. The infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum is also home to a rich set of atomic, ionic, and molecular transitions, allowing for in-depth studies of the makeup of and environments of the gas and dust from which stars and planets form.
This talk takes us on a local tour of our Milky Way and highlights recent observations by our many “infrared eyes on the sky.”
Will these new observations get us closer to learning how our universe works and where we come from?

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Thursday, 06/20/19
05:00 PM – 06:45 PM

Cafe Scientifique Silicon Valley
HanaHaus
456 University Ave
Palo Alto, CA 94301

Passing the Torch: Kepler’s Amazing Discoveries Propel NASA’s TESS Mission into Orbit to Search for Earth’s Closest Cousin

Our understanding of the universe has changed drastically over the past 30 years. With the launch of NASA Ames’ Kepler spacecraft in 2009, remarkable progress has been made in discovering planets orbiting other stars. Recent innovations in astronomy enable us to pursue one of humanity’s greatest questions; Are we alone in the Universe? From the Kepler Mission to NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), vast data collection with new telescopes will revolutionize the fields of asteroseismology and exoplanetary science. Dr. Jon Jenkins showcases the accomplishments of the Kepler Mission, the new discoveries being made by the TESS, and describes the future of exoplanet research.

Website: http://www.cafescipa.org

Cost: Free

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Friday, 06/21/19
08:30 PM – 01:00 AM

Lick Observatory
7299 Mt. Hamilton Rd
Mt. Hamilton, CA 95140

Supermassive black holes in galaxy centers: the view from ALMA Observatory – SOLD OUT

Speaker: Dr. Aaron Barth, UC Irvine

Tickets on sale April 17.

Website: http://www.ucolick.org/summer/stars/2019june21.shtml

Cost: $25

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Friday, June 21, 2019
9:45 PM to 11:45 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr
San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

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Fri. 06/21/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 06/21/2019 and Sat. 06/22/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri. 06/21/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 06/22/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 06/22/19
08:30 PM – 01:00 AM

Lick Observatory
7299 Mt. Hamilton Rd
Mt. Hamilton, CA 95140

Fantastic Worlds and How to Find Them-SOLD OUT

Dr. Lea Hirsch is a recent graduate of the UC Berkeley astronomy program, having earned her PhD in August 2018. As a graduate student at UC Berkeley, she carried out some of her first astronomical observations at Lick Observatory, so she is thrilled to be returning to the mountain. Lea’s research focuses on discovering and characterizing extrasolar planets and their host stars, and she is especially interested in the effects of stellar binary systems on planet formation and evolution. Lea is currently a KIPAC postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University.

Musical performer: Golden Bough

Website: http://www.ucolick.org/summer/music/2019june22.shtml

Cost: $50

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Monday, 06/24/19
07:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Club 21
2111 Franklin St
Oakland, CA 94612

Nerd Nite East Bay: Apollo 11 Recovery, Art Deco, and radiopharmaceuticals
The Reentry and Recovery of Apollo 11

The return of Apollo 11 to Earth was nearly as complicated as the spacecraft’s historic trip to the moon, requiring a perfect and harrowing 24,700 mph trip through the earth entry corridor. Learn about the critical events and meticulous planning that returned Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins from space to the Pacific Ocean fifty years ago, and how the design of the Apollo capsule was critical to narrowing the splashdown site for retrieval by the USS Hornet. Then see how the recovery team planned to protect earth from invasion by potential lunar pathogens with a strict quarantine and generous splashes of sodium hypochlorite before the astronauts returned to the United States as heroes.

Speaker: Bill Miklos, docent at the Hiller Aviation Museum and the USS Hornet – Sea, Air and Space Museum. Laura Fies is the Director of Collections & Exhibitions at the USS Hornet Sea, Air & Space Museum

The Seductive Art Deco of Uptown Oakland

Faced with the aftermath of the 1929 stock market crash, a small group of businesses hustled to bring optimism back to Oakland, constructing some of California’s most beautiful Art Deco buildings in Uptown. Five of these buildings, including the I. Magnin Department Store, the Paramount, and the buildings of Mary Bowles continue to seduce the street going public much as they were designed to do in the mid-1930s. See how bright one mile of neon tubing can be, discover how Art Deco and the Moderne style came to be valued as an integral part of a vibrant modern city, and learn to appreciate Uptown Oakland’s irreplaceable architectural gems.

Speaker: Therese Poletti is the preservation Director at the Art Deco Society of California.

Using New Radiopharmaceuticals to Treat Disease

Learn how radioactive pharmaceuticals can conquer disease, and how producing these drugs and generating new radiopharmaceuticals requires a massive interdisciplinary group with expertise in physics, chemistry and complex clinical trials. Also discover the unique “time travel trick” used to provide these short lived life-saving radiopharmaceuticals to countries without their own particle accelerators, and learn about the latest advances in discovering and scaling up cancer detection strategies and treatments with isotopes.

Speaker: Andrew Voyles is an Assistant Research Engineer at UC Berkeley

Website: https://eastbay.nerdnite.com

Cost: $8 Advance, $10 at door

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Tuesday, 6/25/2019 7:15 PM

Mount Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Avenue
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Speaker: Victoria Strait, UC Davis

Title: Secrets of the Early Universe

Website: https://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/event-view.cfm?Event_ID=95248

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Wednesday, 06/26/19
07:00 PM – 08:00 PM

SETI Institute: SETI Talks
SRI International
333 Ravenswood Ave
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Back to the Moon: This Time to Stay?

NASA is going back to the Moon, this time with commercial and international partners that will help us explore faster and explore more. After successful efforts to commercialize low-Earth orbit, there’s a renewed commitment to this new effort, which calls for the partnership to launch and operate a new space station, the Gateway. The Gateway will first explore the Moon from above and put men and women on the surface by 2024.

To celebrate this endeavor and to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first moonwalk, the SETI Institute has organized two summer talks about this ambitious program, officially known as Artemis.

Greg Schmidt, Director of the Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI), and Michael Sims, CEO, and founder of Ceres Robotics will present this first talk.

Website: https://seti.org/event/back-moon-time-stay

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 06/26/19 7:30 PM

Science on Tap
The Crepe Place
1134 Soquel Ave
Santa Cruz, CA 95062

The Overinflated Case of the Cosmic Rays: Searching for Charged Particles with a Stratospheric Balloon Misison

Over a centenary since their discovery, cosmic rays keep on bewildering those who pause and ponder about them.

Their breadth is grand: these highly energetic charged particles span 15 orders of magnitude in energy, and the information they encode proves a crucial handle on astrophysical process within our Galaxy. Originating from yet unresolved sources (galactic or extra-galactic), cosmic rays travel across the the interstellar medium, to one day find themselves at boundary of the heliosphere, our region of space where the magnetized solar wind significantly alters their propagation.

In this talk, I will introduce the AESOP-Lite balloon-borne mission, a cosmic rays particle detector built with the express purpose of studying the effects of this so-called solar modulation. The instrument had its inaugural flight on a NASA scientific balloon in May 2018. For 5 days, it floated through the stratosphere from its launch in Sweden, across the Arctic to Ellesmere Island, Canada. Going behind the scenes and above the Earth, this talk aims to infuse the spirit of scientific adventure that has captured cosmic rays physicists for over a hundred years now.

Speaker: Sarah Mechbal, UC Santa Cruz

Website: https://wiseucsc.wixsite.com/wise/science-on-tap

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 06/27/19
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Cosmological Simulations for Precision Dark Energy Measurements with Wide Field Galaxy Surveys
Speaker: Joe DeRose, Stanford

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/cosmological-simulations-precision-dark-energy-measurements-wide-field-galaxy-surveys

Cost: Free

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Fri. 06/28/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 06/28/2019 and Sat. 06/29/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 06/28/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 06/29/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Sat. 06/29/2019
Sunset: 8:34 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive
San Carlos, CA

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset… In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

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