Bay Astro – Events of Week of 06/10/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Monday, 06/10/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Probing cosmology with Type Ia Supernovae: A new perspective

We present a method to reconstruct the probability distribution of the weak lensing magnification of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from observational data. The method is directly applicable to future data from surveys like WFIRST. With a realistic synthetic catalog, we measure the weak lensing signature and express the observable in terms of the variance of the lensing magnification. The comparison with cosmological models can be used to constrain cosmological parameters. This boosts SNe Ia as a cosmological probe by probing both geometrical expansion and growth of cosmological density perturbations.

Speaker: Zhongxu Zhai, Caltach

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/probing-cosmology-type-ia-supernovae-new-perspective

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Tuesday, 06/11/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Revealing the Small Scale Structure of Dark Matter with Gravitational Lensing
Speaker: Warren Morningstar, Stanford

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/revealing-small-scale-structure-dark-matter-gravitational-lensing

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 06/12/19
06:30 PM – 08:30 PM

Computer History Museum
1401 N Shoreline Blvd
Mountain View, CA 94043

If Software, Then Space

Humanity’s activities in space have changed how we understand our place in the Universe, and have become essential to life as we know it. Space science – from astronomy to planetary science – have provided new understandings of how we and our planet fit into the cosmic puzzle. Space services – from GPS to communications, and from imaging to scientific measurements – have become invaluable to our everyday lives, from daily navigation to weather prediction, and much, much, more. From the very beginning of humanity’s space history, digital computing has played a vital, enabling role. The importance of computing to space history even compares to that of rocketry. Once the exclusive domain of nation-states, space activities are increasingly pursued by private firms. From launch services to satellite fleets and commercial tourism, computing remains absolutely vital to these pursuits.

As the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing approaches, the Museum is delighted to present a distinguished panel to provide insights and perspectives on the place of computing in space history: Dan Lickly, who played key roles in the development of the software for the Apollo Guidance Computer;; Matthew Shindell, historian of science and a Space History curator at the National Air and Space Museum; and Charles Simonyi, legendary programmer, Microsoft executive, and two-time space tourist.

Website: https://www.computerhistory.org/events/upcoming/#if-software-then-space

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 06/12/19
07:00 PM – 08:30 PM

PianoFight
144 Taylor Street
San Francisco, CA 94102

You Should Know This: The Physics of Time Travel

You Should Know This! is like a TedTalk meets comedy game show. Listen to experts discuss fascinating topics while comedians riff on stage and you win fun, silly prizes for being a nerd.

This month’s show is The Physics of Time Travel.

Does time flow? Is “now” objectively meaningful? Is there a fundamental direction/arrow to time? Ken Wharton, Professor of Physics and Astronomy at San Jose State University, will answers these questions as he explores the physics of time and relativity in time-travel.

Joining him on stage will be host Kevin Whittinghill and the hilarious comedians Natasha Muse and Maria Diploudis.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/you-should-know-this-tickets-62072656988?aff=bas

Cost: $20

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Friday, 06/14/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Why might the LSST Dark Energy Science photometric calibration requirements keep you up at night?

Speaker: Eli Rykoff, SLAC

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/why-might-lsst-dark-energy-science-photometric-calibration-requirements-keep-you-night

Cost: Free

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Fri. 06/14/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 06/14/2019 and Sat. 06/15/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri. 06/14/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 06/15/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 06/15/19
06:00 PM – 09:30 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

Cultural Tales of the Night’s Sky

The journey begins at sunset from the Center into the beautiful surrounding redwood forest. We’ll hike along some of the most popular trails and learn about local history as we uncover evidence from early settlers and will examine local plants as we discuss the ecology of the forest. At sunset, we’ll stop to observe the first of the night’s visible stars and planets and discuss cultural stories related to the night’s sky. Upon return, each hiker will receive two complimentary glasses of wine or beer along with small bites. A perfect evening for a date night or fun with friends!

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/adult-hike-and-sip-cultural-tales-of-the-night-sky

Cost: $30 General, $27 Member

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Saturday, 06/15/19 7:30 PM

East Bay Astronomical Society
Chabot Space & Science Center, 10000 Skyline Blvd
2nd Floor, Spees Bldg, Galileo Room
Oakland, CA 94619

Assembling Life: How can life begin on Earth and other habitable planets?

Dr. Deamer and his colleagues are testing the hypothesis that hydrothermal fresh water pools associated with volcanic land masses are a plausible site for life to begin. In his presentation, he will discuss the implications related to the search for life on Mars and icy moons like Enceladus and Europa.

Speaker: David Deamer, Univ of California

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 06/15/19 7:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

Astronomy Talk: Our Journey Toward Mars

Our journey toward Mars began when first looked up to the night sky and noticed the ruby red glow of this celestial body. Join Mars scientist, Dr. J.R. Skok, on the journey from our first sight of the planet, through the telescopes, satellites, rovers, and samples that have transformed Mars into a familiar world next door. Learn how scientists are working to find evidence of past life on Mars and are developing the technology to allow us to become a future generation of Martians.

Speaker: Dr. J. R. Skok, SETI Institute

Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/262011151/

Cost: Free

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Monday, 06/17/19
02:00 PM – 03:00 PM

Room 101X
Paul G Allen Building
330 Serra Mall
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Direct detection and characterization of exoplanets

Direct imaging is a method to detect and study extra solar planets, which consists of spatially resolving the light of the planet from the light of the star around which it is orbiting. The method is currently sensitive to young gas giant exoplanets that still radiate the heat from their formation, at orbital separation similar to the gas giants in our solar system. A recurring theme in this work is the application of maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference to the detection and characterization of directly imaged planets. In particular, I have designed and implemented the planet detection scheme for the Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey, which is a 600-star direct-imaging survey spanning 2014-2018. In addition to improving the statistical standards of the field, the detection limits set by this work have allowed the derivation of planet occurrence rates for giant planets and informed their formation history. Additionally, I have demonstrated how Bayesian inference can be used to constrain the mass of undetected exoplanets, in particular those potentially carving the gaps of proto-planetary disks, which is the disk of orbiting gas a dust from which planets form. Finally, I developed a statistical framework for the analysis of medium resolution spectroscopic data, which I have used to characterize the planets orbiting the star HR 8799. In 2008, HR 8799 b,c, and d were the first exoplanets, and is still the only multi-planet system, that have been directly imaged. From these data, I derived the first radial velocity measurement of HR 8799 b and c and measured water and carbon monoxide in the atmosphere of HR 8799 d for the first time.

Speaker: Jean-Baptiste Ruffio, Stanford

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/direct-detection-and-characterization-exoplanets

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 06/18/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Maximally constraining dark energy

In this talk I will sketch how combining observational bounds from cosmology with insights from theoretical particle physics allows us to test gravity with unprecedented precision, in particular zooming in on the nature of dark energy. In doing so, I will highlight the interplay between gravitational wave constraints on gravity post-GW170817, data constraints from cosmic microwave background and galaxy clustering measurements, and theoretical priors on such theories from requiring them to be stable and well-defined.

Speaker: Johannes Noller (ETH Zurich)

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/maximally-constraining-dark-energy

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 06/20/19
05:00 PM – 06:45 PM

Cafe Scientifique Silicon Valley
HanaHaus
456 University Ave
Palo Alto, CA 94301

Passing the Torch: Kepler’s Amazing Discoveries Propel NASA’s TESS Mission into Orbit to Search for Earth’s Closest Cousin

Our understanding of the universe has changed drastically over the past 30 years. With the launch of NASA Ames’ Kepler spacecraft in 2009, remarkable progress has been made in discovering planets orbiting other stars. Recent innovations in astronomy enable us to pursue one of humanity’s greatest questions; Are we alone in the Universe? From the Kepler Mission to NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), vast data collection with new telescopes will revolutionize the fields of asteroseismology and exoplanetary science. Dr. Jon Jenkins showcases the accomplishments of the Kepler Mission, the new discoveries being made by the TESS, and describes the future of exoplanet research.

Website: http://www.cafescipa.org

Cost: Free

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Friday, 06/21/19
08:30 PM – 01:00 AM

Lick Observatory
7299 Mt. Hamilton Rd
Mt. Hamilton, CA 95140

Supermassive black holes in galaxy centers: the view from ALMA Observatory – SOLD OUT

Speaker: Dr. Aaron Barth, UC Irvine

Tickets on sale April 17.

Website: http://www.ucolick.org/summer/stars/2019june21.shtml

Cost: $25

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Friday, June 21, 2019
9:45 PM to 11:45 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr
San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

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Fri. 06/21/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 06/21/2019 and Sat. 06/22/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 06/21/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 06/22/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 06/22/19
08:30 PM – 01:00 AM

Lick Observatory
7299 Mt. Hamilton Rd
Mt. Hamilton, CA 95140

Fantastic Worlds and How to Find Them-SOLD OUT

Dr. Lea Hirsch is a recent graduate of the UC Berkeley astronomy program, having earned her PhD in August 2018. As a graduate student at UC Berkeley, she carried out some of her first astronomical observations at Lick Observatory, so she is thrilled to be returning to the mountain. Lea’s research focuses on discovering and characterizing extrasolar planets and their host stars, and she is especially interested in the effects of stellar binary systems on planet formation and evolution. Lea is currently a KIPAC postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University.

Musical performer: Golden Bough

Website: http://www.ucolick.org/summer/music/2019june22.shtml

Cost: $50

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Monday, 06/24/19
07:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Club 21
2111 Franklin St
Oakland, CA 94612

Nerd Nite East Bay: Apollo 11 Recovery, Art Deco, and radiopharmaceuticals
The Reentry and Recovery of Apollo 11

The return of Apollo 11 to Earth was nearly as complicated as the spacecraft’s historic trip to the moon, requiring a perfect and harrowing 24,700 mph trip through the earth entry corridor. Learn about the critical events and meticulous planning that returned Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins from space to the Pacific Ocean fifty years ago, and how the design of the Apollo capsule was critical to narrowing the splashdown site for retrieval by the USS Hornet. Then see how the recovery team planned to protect earth from invasion by potential lunar pathogens with a strict quarantine and generous splashes of sodium hypochlorite before the astronauts returned to the United States as heroes.

Speaker: Bill Miklos, docent at the Hiller Aviation Museum and the USS Hornet – Sea, Air and Space Museum. Laura Fies is the Director of Collections & Exhibitions at the USS Hornet Sea, Air & Space Museum

The Seductive Art Deco of Uptown Oakland

Faced with the aftermath of the 1929 stock market crash, a small group of businesses hustled to bring optimism back to Oakland, constructing some of California’s most beautiful Art Deco buildings in Uptown. Five of these buildings, including the I. Magnin Department Store, the Paramount, and the buildings of Mary Bowles continue to seduce the street going public much as they were designed to do in the mid-1930s. See how bright one mile of neon tubing can be, discover how Art Deco and the Moderne style came to be valued as an integral part of a vibrant modern city, and learn to appreciate Uptown Oakland’s irreplaceable architectural gems.

Speaker: Therese Poletti is the preservation Director at the Art Deco Society of California.

Using New Radiopharmaceuticals to Treat Disease

Learn how radioactive pharmaceuticals can conquer disease, and how producing these drugs and generating new radiopharmaceuticals requires a massive interdisciplinary group with expertise in physics, chemistry and complex clinical trials. Also discover the unique “time travel trick” used to provide these short lived life-saving radiopharmaceuticals to countries without their own particle accelerators, and learn about the latest advances in discovering and scaling up cancer detection strategies and treatments with isotopes.

Speaker: Andrew Voyles is an Assistant Research Engineer at UC Berkeley

Website: https://eastbay.nerdnite.com

Cost: $8 Advance, $10 at door

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