Bay Astro – Events of Week of 07/01/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Tuesday, 07/02/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Two tea talks

Hunting for dark matter substructure in Strong lensing with Neural networks

Dark Matter Substructures are interesting since they can reveal the properties of dark matter, especially the cold dark matter small-scale problems such as missing satellites problem. In recent years, it has become possible to detect individual dark matter subhalos near images of strongly lensed extended background galaxies. In this talk, I would discuss the possibility of using deep neural networks to detect dark matter subhalos, and showing some preliminary result with simulated data.

Speaker: Joshua Yao-Yu Lin, Univ of Illinois @ Urbana-Champaign

Cost: Free

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Massive production of mock catalogues for eBOSS target

In this talk, I will introduce the produce of large sets of mock catalogues for the targets of eBOSS, for estimating the covariance matrix of large-scale clustering measurements, as well as investigation of systematical effects. To this end, we use the methodology, EZmock, developed by Chuang et al. 2015 (https://arxiv.org/abs/1409.1124). By extending the Zel’dovich approximation density field with a proper bias model (the relation between tracers and the density field), we can accurately reproduce the clustering of the observed data including 2- and 3- point clustering statistics in redshift space with very low computational costs. In addition, by constructing the mocks with the same initial condition, but at different redshift snapshots, we include also the light-cone effect (e.g. evolution of bias) in these mock catalogues. Furthermore, the different tracers (LRG/ELG/QSO) populated from the same initial density fields show a consistent cross correlation with that of data.

Speaker: Cheng Zhao, EPFL, Switzerland

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/hunting-dark-matter-substructure-strong-lensing-neural-networks

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Tuesday, 07/02/19
12:23 PM – 02:46 PM

ExplOratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

Total Solar Eclipse: Live from Chile

The Exploratorium continues its 20-year tradition of bringing eclipses to you – we’re traveling to the NSF’s Cerro Tololo Observatory in Chile to broadcast a total solar eclipse visible overhead. Experience the wonder wherever you are: enjoy our live broadcast, available in both English and Spanish on our eclipse app and our website, or come to the museum to enjoy the big-screen broadcasts in person, in addition to a data-driven sonification by composer Wayne Grim and other eclipse programming.

It’s Moon Month at the explO!

Live webstream will be available at weblink

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/total-solar-eclipse-live-chile

Cost: Free with admission

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Thursday, July 4, 9:30 AM-11:30 AM

Delegate Rm.
Embassy Suites Santa Clara
2885 Lakeside Dr.
Santa Clara, CA 95054

Galaxy Forum USA 2019: Silicon Valley
The 7th and 8th Continents: Antarctica, The Moon and Beyond
FREE * RSVP to news@spaceagepub.com or 650-324-3705

Steve Durst, Director ILOA/Space Age Publishing
Welcoming Remarks

Dr. Chris McKay, Senior Scientist, NASA Ames
International and Commercial Considerations for Life in Antarctica and on the Moon

Dr. Edward Young, Postdoc Research Fellow, KIPAC
Studying the Early Universe from Antarctica

Michelle Hanlon, Founder, For All Mankind
Preservation of the Moon

website: http://www.spaceagepub.com

==================================

Thursday, 07/04/19
06:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Lawrence Hall of Science
1 Centennial Drive
Berkeley, CA 94720

4th of July at the Hall

Join us for our first-ever 4th of July celebration at the Hall, and enjoy your exclusive access to the best view of fireworks launched from around the entire Bay Area. Celebrate Independence Day with us for an evening of food, live music, and, of course, science!

Hands-on Science Exhibits and Activities
The science center will be open, including access to all your favorite exhibits at the Hall. Experience Dinosaurs in Motion; explore the Solar System and beyond in Sun, Earth, Universe; and more! Enjoy special 4th of July-themed, hands-on activities, too!

Flames, Flares, and Explosions (30-minute interactive science show)
Get in the spirit of our national holiday and participate in action-packed (and safe!) experiments in this interactive science show. Learn about early fire-making tools, and observe how various fuels ignite. Stay for the grand finale, because this show ends with a really big bang!

Superpower Dogs (40-minute movie)
Experience the live-saving superpowers and extraordinary bravery of some of the world’s most remarkable dogs. As we discover the astonishing science behind their amazing abilities, we’ll never look at our best friends the same way again!

Music
Celebrate the 4th of July with a musical bang, as well!

The Firecracker Brass Quintet – featuring musicians who regularly perform with the San Francisco Ballet Orchestra and other Bay Area ensembles – will be playing music throughout the evening. Enjoy the explosive, colorful sounds of brass accompanying fireworks over the bay.

Between the live performances, we’ll be Dancing with Dinos! Join us!

Fireworks Viewing
From the Hall, we expect to be able to see fireworks from San Francisco, the Berkeley Marina, and even the North Bay. The start times for fireworks from these locations vary, but we expect them to begin at around 9:15 to 9:30 p.m.

If the Bay Area happens to be foggy on July 4th, we will be streaming fireworks shows from locations that haven’t been fogged in!

Please note the information at the weblink on road closure between 7:00 and 10:00.

Website: https://www.lawrencehallofscience.org/visit/events/4th-of-July-at-the-Hall

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Thursday, 07/04/19
06:00 PM – 10:00 PM

ExplOratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

After Dark: Things That Go BOOM!

What’s the science behind fireworks? When has space exploration made or had a big boom? Join us as we celebrate July 4th with rumbling, roaring thunder, the explosive potential of science demonstrations, space travel, and spectacular explorations of other booming activities and exhibits.

Please note: The Exploratorium is not in the viewing corridor for San Francisco’s Independence Day fireworks display. To ensure the best view, you may wish to congregate at Fisherman’s Wharf or Crissy Field.

SCHEDULE

The Big Bang With Hakeem Oluseyi
7:30 p.m. | Bechtel Gallery 3, Wattis Webcast Studio

If you love the flash and crash of Fourth-of-July fireworks, get a load of this: about 14 billion years ago, our dense, hot universe (such as it was) exploded, rapidly becoming much less dense and much less hot and providing the building blocks for everything we know, and many things we still don’t. Get a front-row seat for the Big Bang with astrophysicist Hakeem Oluseyi.

Full-Spectrum Science: Science of Fireworks With Ron Hipschman
8:00 p.m. | Osher Gallery 1, Kanbar Forum

Come oooooh and ahhhh at the science behind these big booms! Where do fireworks come from? Who invented them? What causes their beautiful colors, and how do the bursting shells create such different patterns? Join us for some real illumination, and learn the difference between a jerb and a lance.

Fogo Na Roupa
8:30 p.m. | Roaming

Feel the boom: it’s always a celebration with San Francisco Brazilian dance and percussion company Fogo Na Roupa, and you can join them for a pulsing, resonant party featuring innovative rhythms and cultural dance.

Ping-Pong Ball Explosion With Exploratorium Staff
9:00 p.m. | Gallery 4

Who needs outdoor fireworks when you can get an indoor explosion…of ping-pong balls? Come get an early dose of excitement and delight as we use liquid nitrogen to explode a 45-gallon trash can filled with 3,000 of your favorite bouncy table-sport balls. Cover your ears for the big boom, then enjoy the sprinkling sounds of excitement.

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/after-dark-july-4-2019

Cost: 17.95 advance, 19.95 door, AD members free

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Friday, 07/05/19
06:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

First Friday: Lunar First Friday

Catch a glimpse of our new moon rock, brought back from the Apollo 16 mission and learn all about the moon through hands on activities and our New Planetarium show, Lunaverse. Explore its motion and phases, lunar and solar eclipses, tides, and the Moon’s origin. Watch the preview of the new PBS series Chasing the Moon before it airs, and chat with Astronomer and KQED Science Researcher, Ben Burress after the show!

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/first-friday-lunar-first-friday/

Cost: $5

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Fri. 07/05/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 07/05/2019 and Sat. 07/06/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri. 07/05/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 07/06/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Sat. 07/06/2019
Sunset: 8:34 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive
San Carlos, CA

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset… In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

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Saturday, 07/06/19
09:00 PM – 11:00 PM

College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Jazz Under the Stars

Come peer through our telescopes and see craters on the Moon, the visible planets, star clusters, and more while we listen to CSM’s very own KCSM Jazz 91 FM. Dress warmly. Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5. Directions are available on the Maps, Directions & Parking page.

Website: https://collegeofsanmateo.edu/astronomy/jazz.asp

Cost: Free

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Monday, 07/08/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Are We Ready for Precision Cosmology? General Relativistic Effects and Gauge-Invariant Formalism

The current and upcoming surveys in cosmology will soon deliver an unprecedented amount of precision measurements, truly opening an era of precision cosmology. However, this rapid development in experiments and observations demands substantial advances in theoretical modeling to avoid any systematic errors in our interpretation. The standard theoretical descriptions of galaxy clustering, weak gravitational lensing, and the CMB Boltzmann equations are incomplete and limited to the linear-order perturbation theory, because of two closely related issues: gauge dependence and the observer frame. All theoretical descriptions of cosmological observables should be independent of our coordinate choice, i.e., gauge-invariant. Furthermore, while these observables are measured by the observer, there is no specification of the observer in the standard model. The observer and its rest frame is indeed necessary to properly connect the cosmological observables with QFT calculations in Minkowski space and to derive their fully nonlinear equations. I will describe my ongoing research program to re-write cosmology in the proper relativistic framework, and I will highlight the impact of the missing physics on cosmological observables.

Speaker: Jaiyul Yoo, University of Zurich

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/are-we-ready-precision-cosmology-general-relativistic-effects-and-gauge-invariant-formalism

Cost: Free

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Monday, 07/08/19
01:00 PM – 03:00 PM

Berkeley Public Library Clarement Branch
2940 Benvenue
Berkeley, CA 94705

Space Phantasy Cartooning @Claremont

Graphic novelist and art mentor, Aaron Southerland, will hold a series of cartooning vibe sessions focused on outer space. The sessions are dedicated to the artsy students who desire to create and continue working on their own cartoon and comic characters. Aaron will provide guidance on drawing techniques using a variety of drawing materials.
Ideal for Grades 5-8.

Website: https://www.berkeleypubliclibrary.org/events/summer-cartooning-space-phantasy-claremont

Cost: Free

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Monday, 07/08/19
07:00 PM – 08:30 PM

Central Park Library
2635 Homestead Road
Santa Clara, CA 95051

50 Years Since Our First Step: What Do We Know about the Moon?

July 20, 2019 is the 50th anniversary of humanity’s first steps on the surface of the Moon. In that time, the Apollo missions, a fleet of robotic probes, and observations from Earth have taught us a lot about Earth’s surprising satellite. In this non-technical talk, Andrew Fraknoi, who is sometimes called the Bay Area’s public astronomer, will look at the past, present, and future of the Moon, including its violent origins, the mystery of the frozen water we have found at its poles, and its long-term future as it moves further and further away from us.

Illustrated with beautiful images taken from orbit and on the surface, his talk will make the Moon come alive as an eerie world next door, as a changing object in our skies, and as a possible future destination for humanity and its ambitions. Come find out how the achievements of the Apollo program fit into the bigger picture of our involvement with our only natural satellite.

Speaker: Andrew Fraknoi, Univ of San Francisco & San Francisco State.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/andrew-fraknoi-talk-50-years-since-our-first-step-what-do-we-know-about-where-the-moon-came-from-tickets-63343249364?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

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Monday, 07/08/19
07:30 PM – 09:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Science Expeditions to Planetary Analogs

The search for life on Mars and elsewhere in the solar system requires life detection technology to be tested in real environments before flight. Dr. Bonaccorsi describes field expeditions to various planetary analogs on Earth. The purpose of these is to gain scientific knowledge through a deeper understanding of the target environments, which informs how extreme and cryptic life can be discovered and studied. We also want to test technologies, system interactions, and analytical protocols enabling exploration and scientific breakthrough. At the remote sites, we train teachers, educators, and the next generation of scientists and space explorers. Last but not least, we have a burning desire to excite and engage the public worldwide as well as the local communities in the exploration vision through analog activities here on Earth.

Speaker: Rosalba Bonaccorsi, SETI Institute & NASA Ames Research Center

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/science-expeditions-to-planetary-analogs

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members and Seniors

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Tuesday, 07/09/19
01:00 PM – 02:15 PM

Berkeley Public Library Clarement Branch
2940 Benvenue
Berkeley, CA 94705

Astronomy Talks @ Clarmont

Ever look up at the night sky and wonder what’s all that up there? Have you been following the news about the black hole and the event horizon and would like to understand more about these phenomena and other Astronomy concepts? Join us and get a download on what’s hot in Astronomy via bite-size presentations by local scientists, grad students, and science hobbyists (citizen scientists). Everyone welcome.

See weblink for speakers and topics.

Website: https://www.berkeleypubliclibrary.org/events/whats-astronomy-talks-claremont

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 07/11/19
06:00 PM – 10:00 PM

ExplOratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

After Dark: Made for Space

Things designed and built for space exploration have come a long way from Sputnik and dehydrated orange drink. From spacesuits to rovers, come get some insight into what goes into creating the objects needed for cosmic travel. You’ll also want to sample the goods at Pairings: Dehydration, inspired by NASA’s efforts to make food and drink for zero-gravity environments.

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/after-dark-july-11-2019

Cost: $17.95 advance, $19.95 at the door

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Thursday, 07/11/19
08:00 PM – 10:30 PM

Astronomy Night
Room 131
Campbell Hall
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Astro Night: Explosions in the Sky

While the night sky may appear calm and eternal, the quiet masks a violent dynamism, where stars collide, collapse to black holes, or explode entirely as supernovae. It is only recently that astronomers have begun to deeply explore this transient side of the universe. Such stellar cataclysms stir up spacetime, crush matter to extreme density, and are furnaces within which the heavy elements are forged. We will tell a story of cosmic origins, of how the volatile life and death of stars have lit the sky with massive fireworks, and how the stuff we find on earth (and in ourselves) was born of the ashes.

Speaker: Dan Kasen, UC Berkeley

Stargazing after the lecture 9:00 – 10:30.

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/event/2019-06-21/astro-night

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 07/11/19
08:00 PM – 11:00 PM

City Star Parties – Parade Grounds at the Presidio
103 Montgomery St.
Main Post Lawn
San Francisco, CA 94129

City Star Party @ The Presidio

Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.
Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/events/cat_ids~55/%22%3e%20City%20Star%20Parties/

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 07/12/19
08:30 PM – 01:00 AM

Lick Observatory
7299 Mt. Hamilton Rd
Mt. Hamilton, CA 95140

Lunar Landing Sites, Past and Future – SOLD OUT

As we approach the 50th anniversary of the first human landing on the Moon, we’ll take a look back at each of the Apollo landing sites and discuss why each site was chosen and what made each site so interesting. We’ll then recap some of the fascinating things we’ve learned from robotic lunar missions that followed Apollo. Finally, we’ll look ahead to some of the amazing sites we are considering for future missions to the Moon.

Speaker: Brian Day, NASA

Tickets on sale April 17.

Website: http://www.ucolick.org/summer/stars/2019july12.shtml

Cost: $25

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Friday, July 12, 2019
9:45 PM to 11:45 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr.
San Jose, CA

Near the tennis courtsDetails

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 07/12/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 07/12/2019 and Sat. 07/13/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 07/12/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 07/13/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 07/13/19 8:00 PM

Cushing Memorial (‘Mountain’) Amphitheater
Mt Tamalpais State Park
Pan Toll Road and Ridgecrest Blvd
Mill Valley, CA 94941

Cassini’s Spectacular Final Year at Saturn

Cassini’s 13-year exploration of Saturn stands as the most successful interplanetary mission in NASA history. Its “Grand Finale” (with dives off the outer ring edge, and between inner rings & cloud tops) culminated with a plunge into Saturn’s depths. Insights earned during these maneuvers bring Saturn’s complex glory into focus as never before.

Speaker: Matthew Tiscareno, SETI

Website: http://www.friendsofmttam.org/astronomy/schedule

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 07/13/19
08:30 PM – 01:00 AM

Lick Observatory
7299 Mt. Hamilton Rd
Mt. Hamilton, CA 95140

Music of the Spheres: Natalie Batalha – SOLD OUT

Dr. Natalie Batalha is a Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at UC Santa Cruz. Award-winning astrophysicist Natalie Batalha served as the scientific lead for NASA’s highly successful Kepler mission, which discovered more than 2,500 planets around other stars. When the Kepler space telescope retired in October 2018, Natalie left NASA to join the faculty at UC Santa Cruz, returning to where she had received her Ph.D. in astrophysics in 1997. On the Kepler mission, she identified planets that might be able to sustain life and led the analysis that yielded the discovery in 2011 of the first confirmed rocky planet outside our solar system. Her career trajectory includes a bachelor’s degree in physics from UC Berkeley, a postdoctoral fellowship in Brazil, and a faculty position at San Jose State University in astronomy and astrophysics. She then joined the exoplanet discovery team at NASA Ames Research Center under William Borucki, leading to her position as scientific lead for the Kepler mission. In 2017, Time magazine named her among the 100 most influential people in the world.

Speaker: Natalie Batalha, UC Santa Cruz

Musical performer: The Quitters

Website: http://www.ucolick.org/summer/music/2019july13.shtml

Cost: $50

==================================

Monday, 07/15/19
12:00 PM – 02:00 PM

Berkeley Public Library Clarement Branch
2940 Benvenue
Berkeley, CA 94705

Moon Landing Celebration @Claremont

We will be celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11’s Moon Landing with crafting, playing board games (Spaceteam and Chronology), and then watching a live webcast from NASA on our Prowise big screen. Everyone welcome!

12:00 – 1:00 Crafts and board games (Spaceteam and Chronology)

1:00 – 2:00 Watch NASA live webcast

Website: https://www.berkeleypubliclibrary.org/events/moon-landing-50thcelebration-claremont

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, July 17th, 7:30pm

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum Theater
199 Museum Way, SF

Origin and Orbital History of the Moon”
Matija Cuk, Research Scientist, SETI Institute

Cost: Free

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