Bay Astro – Events of Week of 09/16/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Monday, 09/16/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

A 2020s Vision of CMB Lensing

The field of CMB lensing is somewhere akin to where measurements of the primary CMB itself were 15 years ago; we have detected it’s there and measured some scales to moderate significance, but the exciting era of deep precision measurements is just on the horizon. Over the coming decade, CMB lensing (the distortion of the CMB photons by gravitational lensing due to the matter along the CMB photon’s paths) will precisely probe the distribution of matter in the universe out to high red shifts. It will also allow us to remove lensing B-mode polarization, which will be crucial to potentially detecting primordial gravitational waves from the Big Bang. However, perhaps surprisingly given the important role CMB lensing will play, how to fully extract all of the lensing information from precision CMB data is an open question, as the lensing reconstruction is a difficult high-dimensional non-linear problem. In this talk, I’ll provide a review of CMB lensing science aimed at non-experts. I’ll also describe the methods we have been developing to perform this optimal extraction, which are rooted in Bayesian statistics, machine learning, and modern optimization and sampling algorithms.

Speaker: Marius Millea, UC Berkeley

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/2020s-vision-cmb-lensing

Cost: Free

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Monday, 09/16/19
02:00 PM – 03:30 PM

Alameda Free Library
1550 Oak St
Alameda, CA 94501

Wonderfest: The Most Famous Equation

Around the world, people recognize that E=mc^2 oozes cosmic insight. But what does this “most famous equation” really say? What are energy and mass? And what makes the speed of light, c, so important? [Hint: mass, moving at speed c, doesn’t turn into energy!] Using little more than common experience and 9th-grade math, Einstein’s “special relativity” gem can come to life with surprising insights into the nature of reality.

Speaker Tucker Hiatt, founding director of Wonderfest, has taught physics for a looong time. In 2006, he won the Amgen Award for Science Teaching Excellence, and, from 2008 to 2014, he was a Visiting Scholar in the Stanford Chemistry Department.

Website: http://wonderfest.org/the-most-famous-equation-2/

Cost: Free

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Monday, 09/16/19
04:15 PM – 05:15 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Supersymmetry and Dark Matter: From the Weak Scale to the Planck Scale

While supersymmetry remains an interesting and important extension of the Standard Model of particle interactions, it experimental verification remains elusive. There are many motivations for supersymmetry, many of which center on the notion of Grand Unification. However, motivations for supersymmetry do not necessarily point to weak scale supersymmetry. I will review the prospects for weak scale supersymmetry concentrating on the opportunity for the discovery of supersymmetric dark matter. I will also look at the possibility of that the scale of supersymmetry is much higher (above the inflationary scale) and perhaps as high as the Planck scale.

Speaker: Keith Olive, University of Minnesota

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20190916/supersymmetry-and-dark-matter-from-the-weak-scale-to-the-planck-scale

Cost: Free

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Monday, 09/16/19
06:00 PM – 07:00 PM

Morrison Hall Room 125
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Technosignatures: What Are They, And How Might We Find Them?: Jill Tarter at the Berkeley Forum

Arthur C. Clarke’s third law states that “any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” Since 1960, SETI (Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence) researchers have been searching for that ‘magic’ in the form of radio, and now optical, electromagnetic signals. These searches need to continue and grow utilizing the exponentially increasing capabilities of computing, but within the SETI field, we’ve always reserved the right to get smarter. In 2014, Karl Schroeder (Canadian futurist and science fiction author) suggested a variant of the Third Law; Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from Nature. What opportunities does this increased scope of the Third Law offer to our own 21 st century search for life beyond Earth? As we design and implement the next generations of ground and space based observatories, some of whose primary goals are the imaging of exoplanets and the spectroscopic analysis of their atmospheres, we should consider how we might distinguish between the byproducts of microbes and mathematicians. We are vigorously discussing/debating the right instruments to develop and fly to find biosignatures – how can we find the technosignatures of the mathematicians?

Speaker: Jill Tarter, SETI , emeritus

See weblink to register

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astrobiologist-and-astronomer-jill-tarter-at-the-berkeley-forum-tickets-71448304803?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 09/17/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Planning for JWST Observations

Speaker: Becky Canning, KIPAC

Astrophysics in the MeV gamma-ray band

Speaker: Regina Caputo, NASA Goddard

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/canning-planning-jwst-observations-caputo-astrophysics-mev-gamma-ray-band

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 09/17/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The boundary of galaxy clusters and its implications on SFR quenching of satellite galaxies

Infalling particles form a sharp physical boundary around their first apocenters around the parent halo, which is called “splashback radius”. The previous measurements of splashback radius using optical clusters reported a ~20% discrepancy against the theory prediction. Here, using galaxy clusters detected by SZ surveys (ACT, SPT), we present the detection of the splashback radius and its consistency with respect to N-body simulations, by cross-correlating the galaxy clusters to the DES galaxies. On the other hand, it is known that the infalling galaxies around galaxy clusters experience enhanced star formation quenching. Using galaxy samples split on their colors, we also present the possibility of constraining the quenching parameters in quenching models we adopt (e.g. quenching timescale), making use of N-body simulations.

Speaker: Tae-Hyeon Shin, Pennsylvania State

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 09/18/19 7:30 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114

Exoplanets Across the Sky: the View from TESS

The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a NASA space mission that is tasked with tracking the brightness variations of stars across nearly the entire 360 degree expanse of the sky, in its two year planned mission. In operation for the past year, it has already made numerous new discoveries, including comets, supernovae, and exoplanets. TESS is finding small, rocky planets around stars that are bright enough to view with binoculars, or even the naked eye. These are prime targets for future studies of exoplanetary composition and atmospheres. In this talk I will present some of the many TESS discoveries to date and discuss ongoing efforts to conduct follow-up studies from the ground.

Speaker: Ann Marie Cody, NASA Ames and SETI

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/monthly_lectures/randall/

Cost: Free

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Friday, 09/20/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

The boundary of galaxy clusters and its implications on SFR quenching of satellite galaxies

Speaker: Tae Hyeon-Shin, Univ. of Pennsylvania

Machine learning applied to Cosmology

Speaker: Tomasz Kacprzak, ETH Zurich

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/hyeon-shin-boundary-galaxy-clusters-and-its-implications-sfr-quenching-satellite-galaxies

Cost: Free

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Friday, September 20, 2019 7:00 p.m.
Show & Tell starts at 7:30 pm

Tri-Valley Stargazers
Unitarian Universalist Church
1893 N. Vasco Rd.,
Livermore, CA

Spacecraft Thermal Control

In this presentation we will discuss the role of Thermal Engineers on the spacecraft design team and explore the use of conduction and thermal radiation (the two dominant modes of heat transfer in a vacuum) to control the temperature of the spacecraft.

Speaker: Kenji Ozawa

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

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Friday, September 20, 2019
8:00 PM to 10:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr · San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

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Fri. 09/20/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 09/20/2019 and Sat. 09/21/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri. 09/20/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 09/21/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 09/21/19
10:00 AM – 05:00 PM

Hiller Aviation Museum
601 Skyway Rd.
San Carlos, CA 94070

Smithsonian Museum Day Live

Smithsonian Museum Day Live! is an annual event hosted by Smithsonian magazine. On Saturday, September 21, 2019, visitors who present the Museum Day Live! ticket at the Hiller Aviation Museum will gain free museum admission for two.

Tickets available at weblink starting Aug 15.

Website: https://www.hiller.org/event/smithsonian-museum-day/

Cost: Free

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Saturday, September 21, 2019 7:30 PM

East Bay Astronomical Society
Galileo Room
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Join us for dinner with the speaker beforehand at 5:30 PM at Hunan Yuan Restaurant!
4100 Redwood Road, #11

Origin of the Elements: A Story of Stellar Nucleosynthesis
by Molly Wakeling, UC Berkeley

ABOUT THE TALK:
Where do we come from? A fundamental question of the human species. We might not know the answer, but we do know how the atoms that make up us, the sun, the planets, and the stars were made. Many schoolchildren know that the sun is a star made of hydrogen and helium gas – much like the early universe. But where did that original hydrogen and helium come from? And what about the rest of the periodic table of elements?

The story of our chemical makeup is the story of nucleosynthesis. Big Bang nucleosynthesis generated the seeds of hydrogen and helium within the first 20 minutes of the universe’s existence. Long after that, the first stars formed, where a process slightly more complicated than you might think produces some of the heavier elements. Stars can only produce atoms up to iron, however – the rest require far more energetic processes.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

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Saturday, 09/21/19 7:30 PM

Cushing Memorial (‘Mountain’) Amphitheater
Mt Tamalpais State Park
Pan Toll Road and Ridgecrest Blvd
Mill Valley, CA 94941

Movie Night on Mt. Tam: The Martian

2015 film starring Matt Damon depicts the struggles of an astronaut left behind on Mars as he awaits rescue. Post-screening discussion by Jeffrey Silverman of Science VS Cinema

Website: http://www.friendsofmttam.org/astronomy/schedule

Cost: Free

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Saturday, September 21
Sunset: 7:09 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

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Tuesday, 09/24/19
06:30 PM – 07:30 PM

Menlo Park Main Library
800 Alma St
Menlo Park, CA 94025

California’s Changing Ecosystems: As Observed from Space

Learn the story of California’s changing ecosystems–as observed from space–from USGS Research Physical Scientist Kristin Byrd, Ph.D.

• How can we use images from space to help us understand changes to our coasts, range lands, forests, and wildlife habitats?

• How can they help to predict future changes?

• What more can we learn from advances in earth observing technologies?

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/californias-changing-ecosystems-as-observed-from-space-tickets-71005616711?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 09/24/19
07:00 PM – 09:00 PM

Mount Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Museum Community Room
1931 First Ave
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Looking Through the Gravitational Lens

Learn how astronomers are using gravitational lensing to aid in our understanding of the universe. Dr. Schaan will show how naturally-occurring gravitational lenses work and how they are used to take measurements across the universe. He also will discuss what we expect to learn from current and upcoming experiments with gravitational lensing.

Speaker: Emmanuel Schaan, Berkeley National Labs

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astronomy-lecture-looking-through-the-gravitational-lens-tickets-71878216681?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 09/25/19
07:30 PM – 10:30 PM

Uproar Brewing Company
439 S. First St
San Jose, CA 95113

Astronomy on Tap: Born with the Dinosaurs? The Origin, Age, and Remaining Lifetime of Saturn’s Rings

Speaker: Paul Estrada, SETI

Other speakers TBA

Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/865147153886196/

==================================

Fri. 09/27/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 09/27/2019 and Sat. 09/28/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 09/27/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 09/28/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, September 28
Sunset: 6:59 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

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