Bay Astro – Events of Week of 09/02/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Tuesday, 09/03/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Testing gravity with cosmology: efficient simulations, novel statistics and analytical approaches’

In the era of precision cosmology, a wide range of cosmological surveys, such as the LSST, DESI, Euclid and WFIRST will precisely probe the large-scale structure of the universe, shedding light on the nature of the dark sectors. Given how sensitively the growth of structure depends on the nature of the underlying gravitational field, this will be a unique opportunity to constrain the so-called Modified Gravity models (MG), that are theoretical alternatives to dark energy, which attempt to explain cosmic acceleration through a large-scale modification to general relativity. In order to fully utilize the wealth of incoming data, however, theoretical predictions of structure formation in such alternative scenarios are necessary. Due to the existence of an additional degree freedom, that these models introduce, N-body simulations prove to be highly computationally expensive. In the first part of the talk, I will discuss how we can overcome this issue by using Lagrangian hybrid techniques, which can lead to a speed-up by 2 orders of magnitude. Then I will proceed to introduce novel statistics that can help us more confidently detect MG signals hidden in cosmic density fields, by up-weighting the significance of cosmic voids, where the MG-ΛCDM degeneracy is broken. When structure formation is analytically tractable, finally, I will show that we can make accurate analytical predictions for the two-point statistics using Lagrangian perturbation theory and the Gaussian Streaming Model, simultaneously capturing the effects of both halo-bias and redshift space distortions, effects crucial in the context of spectroscopic surveys, for the first time in modified gravity.

Speaker: Georgios Valogainnis, Cornell

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 09/04/19
06:00 PM – 07:30 PM

Mountain View Public Library
585 Franklin St
Mountain View, CA 94041

Physics vs. Time Travel

Everyone loves a good time travel story, but given what we know — and don’t know — about physics, is time travel in any way plausible? Using popular movies as a framework, Professor Ken Wharton will outline several distinct categories of consistent time travel stories, and discuss possible connections with actual physics. Ken Wharton is physics professor at San Jose State University. No registration required.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/science-talk-physics-vs-time-travel-tickets-68895515341?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 09/05/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Physics and Astrophysics Building Room 102/103
452 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Testing GR and the Massive Black Hole Paradigm with Infrared Interferometry

Adaptive optics (AO) imaging and spectroscopy of the central star cluster in the Galactic Center over the past three decades have established that there is a concentration of 4 million solar masses associated with the compact radio source SgrA*, presumably a massive black hole. In 2017 we put into operation GRAVITY, for combining the near-IR light of all four 8m UT telescopes of the ESO-VLT for milli-arcsec imaging, and for improving the astrometric measurement precision tenfold compared to our previous AO data. DUring the peri-passage of the star S2 in May 2018 we were able to robustly detect the gravitational redshift and test Einstein’s equivalence principle in the orbital elements of the star, thus for the first time testing GR in the high mass regime. The detection of the Schwarzschild pression of the orbit is expected in the next year. During bright near-IR ‘flares’ SgrA* exhibts 100 micro-arcsec loops/wobbles, which may be interpreted as orbital motion of ‘hot spots’ in the accretion flow on scales of 4-5 R_S. If so, the mass within the hot spot orbits is consistent with the 4 million solar masses. The flares also exhibit polarization loops and we find that their orbital angular momentum is close to that of the OB-star disk at 10^5 R_S. I will end with an outlook how measurements with GRAVITY and the EHT can together test the Kerr metric on scales of a few R_S.

Speaker: Reinhard Genzel, Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/special-astrophysics-colloquium-testing-gr-and-massive-black-hole-paradigm-infrared

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 09/05/19 4:00 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The Next Frontier of Low-Mass Galaxy Formation

Satellites of the Milky Way (MW) have long provided stringent tests of cosmic reionization, cold dark matter, and the physics of galaxy formation on the smallest scales. However, there is growing evidence that the MW satellites may not be broadly representative. Compared to the MW, satellite systems throughout the local Universe show varying luminosity functions, stellar populations, quenching properties, and spatial configurations, often in excess of cosmic variance. In this talk, I discuss ongoing efforts to expand our knowledge of low-mass galaxy formation beyond the confines of the MW halo. Specifically, I describe how new understanding of our nearest neighbor M31 and its satellites raise questions about whether insights established in MW satellites are generally applicable to low-mass systems or stem from the specific accretion history of the MW. I highlight a new Hubble Space Telescope Treasury program aimed at establishing the M31 ecosystem at the next frontier for low-mass galaxy studies. I also preview the potential of the James Webb Space Telescope and next-generation space-based telescopes (e. g. Luvoir) for facilitating detailed studies of low-mass galaxies throughout the Local Volume.

Speaker: Dan Weisz, UC Berkeley

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/event/2019-09-05/Colloquium

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 09/05/19
06:00 PM – 09:00 PM

Triple Ring
39655 Eureka Dr
Newark, CA 94560

Searching for Life Beyond Earth

The concept of the Habitable Zone (HZ) was once the only way to estimate the chances of a planet to support life. The past decades of exploration in the Solar System and the study of terrestrial extreme environments have shown that the subsurface and interior of several planets and moons located outside the HZ had – or may still have – conditions suitable for the development and survival of life. Beyond the Solar System, the discovery of thousands of exoplanets gives us a chance to expand our understanding of planetary system formation and evolution, and infer their ability to develop biology. These recent discoveries also give us important information about the probability for the existence of other technologically advanced civilizations in the universe. While the current estimates of life potential, whether simple or complex, are based on concepts such as planetary habitability and the coevolution of life and environment, emerging new theories bridge biology, neuroscience, information technology, and quantum physics, and, if verified, would fundamentally change our views on the origin and nature of life, and the meaning of its exploration.

Speaker: Dr. Nathalie Cabrol, SETI

Advance registration required at weblink

Website: http://www.tripleringtech.com/september-5-2019-searching-for-life-beyond-earth/

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 09/05/19
07:30 PM – 10:00 PM

Astronomy Night
Campbell Hall
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Astro Night: Galaxies Across Cosmic Time

For a century, astronomers have studied galaxies— immense systems made up of gas, dust, dark matter, and stars— to help us understand our place in the vast night sky. In this talk, I’ll start by taking you on a journey through human time, from how early astronomers learned that the mysterious “island Universes” they observed at night are distant galaxies like our own Milky Way, to how modern astronomers use space telescopes to travel through time and peer into the distant past. Then, I’ll take you on a journey through cosmic time and describe how galaxies grow and change over billion-year long timescales. Finally, we’ll venture even further into the unknown and learn about one of the greatest unsolved mysteries about how galaxies evolve.

Speaker: Wren Suess, UC Berkeley

Stargazing follows the lecture from 8:30 – 10:00.

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/event/2019-08-22/astro-night-1-1

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 09/05/19
07:30 PM – 10:30 PM

City Star Parties – Parade Grounds at the Presidio
103 Montgomery St.
Main Post Lawn
San Francisco, CA 94129

San Francisco City Star Party @ Parade Grounds in the Presidio of San Francisco
Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.

Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/events/cat_ids~55/%22%3e%20City%20Star%20Parties/

Cost: Free

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Friday, 09/06/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Cryogenic Multiplexing for CMB Detector Arrays

Speaker: Cyndia Yu

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/cryogenic-multiplexing-cmb-detector-arrays

Cost: Free

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Friday, 09/06/19 7:30 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Charon, Pluto’s Companion: What We’re Learning from New Horizons

Pluto’s large moon Charon turned out to be far more interesting than astronomers expected. Pluto was the star of the New Horizons show, but the features on Charon’s surface tell a fascinating tale of how icy worlds could form far from the gravitational influences of the giant planets. There is evidence of a world-wide sub-surface ocean early on, and of global expansion as that ocean froze solid. Charon’s surface also has a region of plains where icy materials may once have flowed and smoothed over the fractures present elsewhere on its surface. Dr. Beyer will be your guide through this story of formation and change in the frozen reaches of the outer Solar System.

Speaker: Dr. Ross Beyer, SETI Institute

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/meetings.html

Cost: Free

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Friday, September 6, 2019
8:30 PM to 10:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr ·
San Jose, CA

Details
Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

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Fri. 09/06/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 09/06/2019 and Sat. 09/07/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri. 09/06/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 09/07/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 09/07/19 7:30 PM

Cushing Memorial (‘Mountain’) Amphitheater
Mt Tamalpais State Park
Pan Toll Road and Ridgecrest Blvd
Mill Valley, CA 94941

MISSION: MARS

We are making progress globally – from the Arctic to Antarctica, from underground labs to the International Space Station – to achieve the first human voyage to Mars. Come explore the what, why, how, when, and who of our first journey to the Red Planet.

Speaker: Pascal Lee, SETI and Mars Institute

Website: http://www.friendsofmttam.org/astronomy/schedule

Cost: Free

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Monday, 09/09/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Why Do Dark Matter Haloes Die Together? The Causes of Halo Assembly Bias at Galaxy Masses

At a constant mass, old dark matter haloes and young dark matter haloes cluster differently from one another. This fact, known as “assembly bias,” severely complicates the construction of mock catalogues and serves as a major challenge for structure formation models. In this talk, I test and synthesize the many competing explanations for this phenomenon into a single cohesive story with a strong focus on low mass haloes.

Speaker: Philip Mansfield, Univ. of Chicago

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/why-do-dark-matter-haloes-die-together-causes-halo-assembly-bias-galaxy-masses

Cost: Free

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Monday, 09/09/19
07:30 PM – 09:00 PM

Benjamin Dean Astronomy Lecture Series
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Mapping the Universe: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is an unprecedented all-sky spectroscopic survey of over six million objects. It is designed to decode the history of the Milky Way galaxy, trace the emergence of the chemical elements, reveal the inner workings of stars, and investigate the origin of planets. SDSS will also create a contiguous spectroscopic map of the interstellar gas in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies that is 1,000 times larger than the state of the art.

Speaker: Juna Kollmeier, Carnegie Institution for Science

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/mapping-the-universe-the-sloan-digital-sky-survey

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members and Seniors

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Friday, 09/13/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Observations and modelling of gamma-ray flares in blazars

Speaker: Manuel Meyer

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/observations-and-modelling-gamma-ray-flares-blazars

Cost: Free

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Friday, 09/13/19
07:00 PM – 08:30 PM

Bookshop West Portal
80 W Portal Ave
San Francisco, CA 94127

Wonderfest: Quantum Worlds

Quantum mechanics, the physics of the very small, is the most accurate and far-reaching theory in science. (Bear in mind: theory is as good as it gets in science!) Still, physicists themselves admit that they don’t fully understand the quantum world. Caltech physicist and New York Times best-selling author Sean Carroll suggests that we do have a very promising way to understand the mysteries of the quantum world … of quantum worlds.

Website: http://wonderfest.org/quantum-worlds/

Cost: Free

====================

Fri. 09/13/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================
The
Fri. 09/13/2019 and Sat. 09/14/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 09/13/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 09/14/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 09/14/19
01:00 PM – 02:00 PM

Oshman Family JCC
3921 Fabian Way
Palo Alto, CA 94303

Sean Carroll: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Space-Time

Quantum mechanics is the most accurate and far-reaching theory in physics, yet physicists themselves readily admit that they don’t understand it. But Caltech physicist and New York Timesbest-selling author Sean Carroll suggests that we do have a very promising way of understanding the mysteries of the quantum world.

This event was rescheduled from July 16.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sean-carroll-quantum-worlds-and-the-emergence-of-space-time-tickets-63771484226?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: $22 General, $15 Member, $8 Student

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Saturday, 09/14/19 7:30pm

Peninsual Astronomical Society
Los Altos Public Library
13 S. San Antonio Rd.
Los Altos, CA

“Getting the Astronomy Right in a Novel”

NORM SPERLING

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Saturday, 09/14/19 8:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

Exploring Pluto, Charon & the outer reaches of the solar system

In 2015, the New Horizons spacecraft flew past icy Pluto and Charon and sent back the first images of these objects in the furthest outskirts of our solar system. I will review what we now know about Pluto and Charon, and how the study of these bodies has evolved. I’ll also discuss the images received over the New Year from the much smaller icy object Ultima Thule.

Speaker: Francis Nimmo

Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/264143602/

Cost: Free

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Sunday, 09/15/19
04:30 PM – 09:00 PM

USS Hornet
707 W Hornet Ave
Alameda, CA 94501

AIAA-SF Annual Banquet celebrating 50th anniversary of Apollo 11

This year, we are celebrating the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 by hosting our annual banquet on the USS Hornet, the aircraft carrier that picked up the crew of Apollo 11 from the Pacific Ocean. During this event, we will have a buffet style dinner in the ship’s officers wardroom, a talk about the Apollo 11 Earth Landing System given by Anthony Smith, an engineer who was directly involved in its development, an awards session, and finally there will be a special Apollo 11 themed guided tour aboard the ship, including a special exhibit on the same theme.

This talk will consist of two main parts. The first part focuses on the pre-Apollo history, and gives a 10-year timespan overview of several milestones of the space program up to, and including, Apollo 11. The second part elaborates on the personal experiences of the speaker by means of a pre-recorded interview which was made for the Hornet Museum Archives. There will be an opportunity for Q&A at the end of the presentation.

Space is limited and prices go up after 9/8.

Website: https://aiaa-sf.org/event/aiaa-banquet-2019/

Cost: $19.00 – $49.00

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