Bay Astro – Events of Week of 09/23/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Monday, 09/23/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Tests of new physics with the Lyman-alpha forest

The Lyman-alpha forest (the correlated absorption seen in the spectra of high-redshift quasars) is a uniquely powerful probe of new physics in the cosmological model – whether that be properties of the neutrino, the nature of cosmic inflation or the phenomenology of dark matter. The challenge lies in robustly disentangling the cosmology and the astrophysics of the intergalactic medium from which it is sourced. I will discuss new models and methods that can achieve the statistical inference sufficiently accurate for current and upcoming spectroscopic surveys (e.g., eBOSS, DESI). These exploit the most sophisticated simulations of the Universe to-date and innovative machine-learning algorithms (Bayesian emulator optimisation). Deviation from the standard model of cold, collisionless dark matter would leave a characteristic suppression in the linear matter power spectrum that the Lyman-alpha forest can reveal. I will present preliminary bounds on the shape of this suppression and discuss the implications for the allowed range of dark matter candidates.

Speaker: Keir Rogers, Stockholm University

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/tests-new-physics-lyman-alpha-forest

Cost: Free

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Monday, 09/23/19 12:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Particle physics beyond the Standard Model (and other fun) with clusters of galaxies

Clusters of galaxies provide superb laboratories for exploring new particle physics. They represent the most massive dark matter objects in the Universe, making them an important laboratory for probing dark matter decay and annihilation signatures. However, in this talk, I will highlight how the transparency (or lack thereof) of the magnetized intracluster medium (ICM) to X-rays can be a powerful probe of axion-sector physics. I will present new data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory for the Perseus cluster which already allows us to set constraints on the existence of low-mass axion-like particles which exceed those possible from the next-generation laboratory and ground-based searches. After discussing the future prospects and limitations of these studies, I will briefly discuss the other astrophysical implications of the new Chandra data for our understanding of AGN feedback and fuelling in Perseus.

Speaker: Christopher Reynolds, Cambridge

Website: http://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 09/24/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Tests of new physics with the Lyman-alpha forest

The Lyman-alpha forest (the correlated absorption seen in the spectra of high-redshift quasars) is a uniquely powerful probe of new physics in the cosmological model – whether that be properties of the neutrino, the nature of cosmic inflation or the phenomenology of dark matter. The challenge lies in robustly disentangling the cosmology and the astrophysics of the intergalactic medium from which it is sourced. I will discuss new models and methods that can achieve the statistical inference sufficiently accurate for current and upcoming spectroscopic surveys (e.g., eBOSS, DESI). These exploit the most sophisticated simulations of the Universe to-date and innovative machine-learning algorithms (Bayesian emulator optimisation). Deviation from the standard model of cold, collisionless dark matter would leave a characteristic suppression in the linear matter power spectrum that the Lyman-alpha forest can reveal. I will present preliminary bounds on the shape of this suppression and discuss the implications for the allowed range of dark matter candidates.

Speaker: Keir Rigers, Nordita

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 09/24/19
06:30 PM – 07:30 PM

Menlo Park Main Library
800 Alma St
Menlo Park, CA 94025

California’s Changing Ecosystems: As Observed from Space

Learn the story of California’s changing ecosystems–as observed from space–from USGS Research Physical Scientist Kristin Byrd, Ph.D.

• How can we use images from space to help us understand changes to our coasts, range lands, forests, and wildlife habitats?

• How can they help to predict future changes?

• What more can we learn from advances in earth observing technologies?

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/californias-changing-ecosystems-as-observed-from-space-tickets-71005616711?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 09/24/19
07:00 PM – 09:00 PM

Mount Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Museum Community Room
1931 First Ave
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Looking Through the Gravitational Lens

Learn how astronomers are using gravitational lensing to aid in our understanding of the universe. Dr. Schaan will show how naturally-occurring gravitational lenses work and how they are used to take measurements across the universe. He also will discuss what we expect to learn from current and upcoming experiments with gravitational lensing.

Speaker: Emmanuel Schaan, Berkeley National Labs

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astronomy-lecture-looking-through-the-gravitational-lens-tickets-71878216681?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 09/25/19
07:30 PM – 10:30 PM

Uproar Brewing Company
439 S. First St
San Jose, CA 95113

Astronomy on Tap: Saturn’s Rings, Star Birth, and Exoplanets

Born with the Dinosaurs? The Origin, Age, and Remaining Lifetime of Saturn’s Rings

Speaker: Paul Estrada, SETI

A Star is Born: How Stars Form in Space

Speaker: Jim Jackson, Stratospheric Observatory for Infrafred Astronomy

What do we Know About Exoplanets? And What’s Left to Learn?

Speaker: Jesse Dotson, NASA Ames

Website: Click to Visit

Cost: Free

Website:https://www.facebook.com/events/865147153886196/

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Thursday, 09/26/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
SLAC Fred Kavli Building (51) 3rd Fl Conference Room
2575 Sand Hill Rd
Menlo Park, CA 94305

Tip the Scales: Pushing the Limits of Computational Astrophysics

The role of computation in astrophysics has grown substantially over the last decade, driven by the growth in computer power, sophistication of computational methodologies, and increasing data volumes. Over the next decade, the importance of computational astrophysics will continue to grow as computers reach exascale performance and data-intense observational surveys like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, Euclid, and WFIRST become available. I will present some recent efforts in computational astrophysics that push the limits of the world’s fastest supercomputers, especially by leveraging massively parallel hardware for numerical simulation. I will also show how the same hardware architectures are enabling new advances in astrophysical data analysis through deep learning. Together, numerical simulation and data analysis enabled by advanced computation will help us unlock some long standing mysteries throughout astrophysics.

Speaker: Brant Robertson, UC Santa Cruz

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/tip-scales-pushing-limits-computational-astrophysics

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 09/26/19 3:45 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Ultraluminous X-ray Sources: Observing the Extremes of Accretion and the Search for Intermediate Mass Black Holes

Speaker: Fiona Harrison, Caltech

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/i/astronomy-colloquium

Cost: Free

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Friday, 09/27/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Diffuse Galaxies As a Probe for Dark Matter

Low mass galaxies provide an essential testing ground for theoretical predictions of cosmology. They dominate the counts in the Local Group and have high mass-to-light ratios, making them ideal for studying dark matter on small scales. Recent advances in telescope instrumentation have opened a new window into the population of such low surface brightness galaxies. In this talk, I will present recent results from the Dragonfly Telescope, which has identified large numbers of low surface brightness galaxies beyond the Local Group and discuss its contribution and potential in extending our ability to test LCDM on small scales. I will discuss the recently identified population of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) that holds the promise of new constraints on low mass galaxies dynamics, as their spatial extent and often significant globular cluster populations provide probes on spatial scales where dark matter should dominate the kinematics. I will also discuss the dynamics of two UDGs that seems to lack most, if not all, of their dark matter. I will finish by presenting our strategy for finding low surface brightness galaxies as part of the recently completed Dragonfly Wide Field Survey, covering 330 sq. deg., in the GAMA and Stripe 82 fields.

Speaker: Shany Dalieli, Yale

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/diffuse-galaxies-probe-dark-matter

Cost: Free

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Fri. 09/27/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 09/27/2019 and Sat. 09/28/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri. 09/27/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 09/28/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, September 28
Sunset: 6:59 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

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Tuesday, 10/01/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Direct Imaging of Habitable Exoplanets* (*In the Next Decade)

Direct detection and detailed characterization of habitable exoplanets is a key science goal of future observatories. Although space-based telescopes will characterize exo-Earths in the late 2030s, extreme adaptive optics (ExAO) on extremely large ground-based telescopes (ELTs) has the potential to enable such characterization in the next decade. However, if current state-of-the-art ExAO instruments are placed on ELTs, we would still be orders of magnitude less sensitive than what is needed to image a habitable exoplanet. With current telescopes we are also orders of magnitude away from imaging and characterizing the thermal emission from young exo-Jupiters and the reflected starlight from any exoplanets. Current ExAO instruments are unable to reach these deeper contrasts due to chromatic and temporal wavefront errors. I will first demonstrate the effect of these limitations using on-sky datasets taken with the Subaru Coronagraphic ExAO system. I will then illustrate a path forward: fast focal plane wavefront sensing of both quasi-static and atmospheric speckles. Our new method, called the Fast Atmospheric Self-coherent camera Technique (FAST), is designed to overcome these limitations. I will present the concept of FAST and show results from both numerical simulations and laboratory testing. These results illustrate that the improvement from FAST could enable direct imaging of gas giants in reflected light and young exo-Jupiters in thermal emission on current telescopes and, in the future, habitable exoplanets on ELTs.

Speaker: Ben Gerard, Univ. of Victoria

X-ray follow-up studies of highly energetic extragalactic explosions

Speaker: Dheeraj Pasham, MIT

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/gerard-direct-imaging-habitable-exoplanets-next-decade-pasham-x-ray-follow-studies-highly

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 10/02/19 7:00 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 201
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Seeing the Unseeable: Capturing an Image of a Black Hole

Black holes are cosmic objects that are so small and dense, that nothing, not even light can escape their gravitational pull. Until recently, no one had ever seen what a black hole actually looked like. The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is a global array of radio dishes, linked together by a network of atomic clocks, that form an Earth-sized virtual telescope that can resolve the nearest supermassive black holes. The EHT detects light that is emitted from gas that is close to the black hole event horizon, and this light travels unimpeded to telescopes on the Earth. Einstein’s theories predict that the EHT should see a ring of light and a dark region within that marks the point where light cannot escape. On April 10th, 2019, the EHT project reported success: we have imaged a black hole, and have seen the predicted ring of light that confirms General Relativity as the boundary of a black hole. This talk will cover how this was accomplished, details of the first results, as well as some future directions.

Speaker: Shepard Doeleman, Director, Event Horizon Telescope

Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/36th-bunyan-lecture-sheperd-doeleman-seeing-unseeable-capturing-image-black-hole

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 10/03/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Varian Physics Building, Room 355
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

The Event Horizon Telescope: Imaging a Black Hole

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) array operating at the shortest possible wavelengths, which can resolve the event horizons of the nearest supermassive black holes. Observing at mm radio wavelengths enables detection of photons that originate from deep within the gravitational potential well of the black hole, and travel unimpeded to telescopes on the Earth. The primary goal of the EHT is to resolve and image the predicted ring of emission formed by the photon orbit of a black hole and to eventually track dynamics of matter as it orbits close to the event horizon. A sustained program of improvements to VLBI instrumentation and the addition of new sites through an international collaborative effort led to Global observations in April 2017: the first campaign with the potential for horizon imaging. After 1.5 years of data reduction and analysis we report success: we have imaged a black hole. The resulting image is an irregular but clear bright ring, whose size and shape agree closely with the expected lensed photon orbit of a 6.5 billion solar mass black hole. This talk will cover the project and first results as well as some future directions.

Speaker: ShepDoeleman, Harvard

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/event-horizon-telescope-imaging-black-hole

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 10/03/19 3:45 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The inventory and history of CO2 and H2O on Mars – past, present, and future

Speaker: Bruce Jakosky, Colorado

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/i/astronomy-colloquium

Cost: Free

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Friday, 10/04/19
06:00 PM – 07:30 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

Future Friday’s – Behind the Scenes Planning – To The Moon and Beyond

This month hear from SETI Senior Research Scientist, Margaret Race. Her lecture, Behind the Scenes Planning – To the Moon and Beyond, gives you an exclusive look into the important prep work that the public never sees before hitting the launchpad.
If you’ve ever been curious about the search for extraterrestrial life, Dr. Race’s work focuses on astrobiology, science policy issues associated with space exploration and emerging technologies. Get an insider’s peek at the future of space travel!

Admission includes First Friday event.

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/future-friday-setis-margaret-race/

Cost: $5

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Friday, October 4, 2019
7:45 PM to 9:45 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr.
San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

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Fri. 10/04/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 10/04/2019 and Sat. 10/05/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 10/04/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 10/05/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 10/05/19
01:00 PM – 11:00 PM

College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Family Science & Astronomy Festival + Makerspace

Family Science and Astronomy Festival is a day of free learning and fun for the young and young at heart.

Featuring planetarium shows, science workshops, astronomical observations, public safety demos, and more.

The CSM Library Makerspace offers drop-in crafting, electronics, media and tinkering workshops.

The CSM Career and Workforce Hub will offer a Career Preparation Workshop featuring Oscar Garcia, CEO of Aspira and former LinkedIn Consultant.

The events culminate in a key note lecture by Brian Day, Lead for Lunar and Planetary Mapping and Modeling at NASA’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute

Contact:
Mohsen Janatpour
Email: Janatpour@smccd.edu
Phone: (650) 574-6272

Website: https://collegeofsanmateo.edu/familyscienceday/

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 10/05/19 7:00 PM

Cushing Memorial (‘Mountain’) Amphitheater
Mt Tamalpais State Park
Pan Toll Road and Ridgecrest Blvd
Mill Valley, CA 94941

Illuminating Dark Matter

Dark matter is the cosmic parent of all vast structures in the night sky, including our own Milky Way galaxy. Yet, we know so little about this mysterious stuff that constitutes over 80% of the material universe. This talk will illuminate our universe’s elusive dark matter, highlighting the ingenious methods that scientists use to search for it.

Speaker: Robert McGehee, UC Berkeley

Website: http://www.friendsofmttam.org/astronomy/schedule

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 10/05/19
07:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Foothill College Observatory
12345 El Monte Road
Next to parking lot 4
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Observe the Moon Night

The Foothill College Astronomy Department and the Peninsula Astronomical Society would also like to invite you to join in on NASA’s Observe the Moon Night at the Foothill College Observatory. The first quarter moon on Oct. 5 provides a prime opportunity to join people around the world in taking a closer look at our nearest neighbor.

Website: https://foothill.edu/events/?sr=2&rec_id=6496

Cost: Free ($3 parking)

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Saturday, 10/05/19
07:30 PM – 10:30 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

First Friday: International Observe the Moon Night
International Observe the Moon Night is a worldwide celebration of lunar science and exploration held annually since 2010. One day each year, everyone on Earth is invited to observe and learn about the Moon together, and to celebrate the cultural and personal connections we all have with our nearest neighbor. Join us during our free public viewing hours as we observe the Moon through our telescopes! (Weather Permitting).

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/international-observe-the-moon-night/

Cost: Free

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Sunday, 10/06/19
07:30 PM – 10:30 PM

City Star Parties – Exploratorium
Pier 17
Green Street
San Francisco, CA 94111

City Star Party @ The ExplOratorium

Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.
Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: Click to Visit

Cost: Free

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