Bay Astro – Events of Week of 10/28/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Monday, 10/28/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Searching for supermassive black hole binaries

Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are a natural byproduct of galaxy mergers. Yet, they remain undetectable at small separations. A promising method is to identify quasars with periodic variability. I will discuss candidates identified in time-domain surveys, as well as ongoing efforts to confirm their binary nature. I will also describe efforts to detect gravitational waves from SMBHBs with Pulsar Timing Arrays and constraints on tentative binaries in the local universe from the most recent NANOGrav upper limits.

Speaker: Maria Charisi, Caltech

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/searching-supermassive-black-hole-binaries

Cost: Free

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Monday, 10/28/19 12:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

What have we learnt about relativistic outflows from GW170817?
Speaker: Ore Gottlieb, Tel Aviv

Website: Click to VisiCost: Free

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Monday, 10/28/19
07:00 PM – 09:30 PM

Club 21
2111 Franklin St
Oakland, CA 94612

Nerd Nite East Bay: Barnacles, Chevron Richmond, Martian Atmosphere
Shaped By Chevron: How Oil, WWII and Migration Created Richmond

In an echo of the corporate towns of America’s past, learn why Chevron was built in Richmond or, more accurately, how Chevron built Richmond around the massive oil refinery. See how World War II and the second Great Migration bifurcated Richmond, and learn how Chevron Richmond’s control over city development and media amplified the division between Richmond and North Richmond and moved the center of Richmond city life from downtown to a 1970s mall overlooking the Bay.

Speaker: Mia Renauld

================

Resurrecting the Martian Atmosphere for Human Life

Mars is humanity’s most obvious and viable escape from a future inhospitable Earth, but the leap from our world to the Red Planet will require a nearly inconceivable amount of work on the Martian atmosphere. Learn why Mars was once warm and wet, with majestic flowing river and beautiful lakes, and what happened to make modern Mars so cold, dry, and incompatible with human life. Then hear about current projects that are preparing Mars for human colonization, why terraforming is crucial to the reformation of Mars’ atmosphere, and why human life on Mars will require digging a channel one billion times the size of the tunnel between England and France.

Speaker: Rob Lillis, UC Berkeley

===============

Using Fossil Barnacles to Track Ancient Whale Migration

Learn how fossil barnacles can be used to track the migration of prehistoric whales and answer questions about ancient and modern whale behavior. See how barnacles give us crucial insight into the morphological evolution of whales and how they can identify hot spots of productivity in the ancient oceans. Learn how fossils suggest Pleistocene Panama was once party central for ancient leviathans, discover how whales change behavior in response to changes in Earth’s climate, and see how modern barnacles accurately map whale migration.

Speaker: Larry Taylor, UC Berkeley

Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/391516395118756/

Cost: $8 Advance, $10 at door

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Tuesday, 10/29/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Berti: Testing Galaxy Assembly Bias with PRIMUS

The “halo model” of galaxy evolution assumes all properties of a galaxy are determined statistically by the mass of its dark matter halo. While this assumption yields predictions that largely agree with observations, the full picture of the connection between galaxies and halos is incomplete without assembly bias. Probes of galaxy assembly bias include galactic conformity and the differential clustering of star-forming and quiescent central galaxies at fixed stellar mass. I will show that two-halo galactic conformity may not be a real effect, and demonstrate that efforts to refine galaxy evolution models should instead focus on correlations between halo accretion rate and galaxy properties like star formation rate.

Speaker: Angela Berti, UC San Diego

Electronics for precision cosmology: challenges in multiplexed readout of large detector arrays with the Simons Array CMB polarization experiment

Speaker: John Groh, UC Berkeley

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/berti-testing-galaxy-assembly-bias-primus-groh-electronics-precision-cosmology-challenges

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 10/29/19. 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

From dark matter to observed skies, creating a universe with state-of-the-art simulations

Preparations for upcoming cosmological surveys such as LSST can benefit greatly from the use of simulated observations, however creating realistic galaxy catalogs is an incredibly complex and challenging task. In this talk I will first discuss how such simulations can aid in the interpretation of modern cosmological datasets. I will then detail the creation of the cosmoDC2 synthetic sky catalog built for the LSST-DESC collaboration, with a particular focus on the development of the weak lensing pipeline. Finally I will discuss lessons learnt in the context of a future synthetic galaxy catalog currently in the early stages of development.

Speaker: Particia Larsen, ANL

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 10/29/19
04:30 PM – 05:30 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 200
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Tension between early and late universe measurements of H0: Hint of new physics?

Prof.Tommaso Treu of UC Los Angeles will give the Applied Physics/Physics colloquium

Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/tension-between-early-and-late-universe-measurements-h0-hint-new-physics

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 10/31/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

All Hands on Deck: What observations, theory, simulation and laboratory experiments are teaching us about the powerful AGN jets

Powerful jets from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are observed on scales from Mpc down to astronomical units, from essentially all observable wavebands and via multi-messengers. These enigmatic sources could hold the key to several long-standing mysteries such as ultra-high energy cosmic rays and more recently the origin of high-energy ~ PeV neutrinos. Understanding such sources has strongly influenced the development of (general) relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and kinetic plasma astrophysics, including even laboratory experiments. We present observational and theoretical/numerical modeling results that link the large-scale global morphologies with small-scale particle energization processes. We discuss how the behavior of magnetic fields can shift the framework within which we interpret the AGN jets/lobes. These include their lobe polarization properties, lobe energy composition, Fermi flares and their corresponding optical polarization properties, as well as the efficient particle acceleration by the dissipation of jet magnetic fields, studied via comprehensive multi-dimensional plasma kinetic simulations. Future prospects of progress in simulations, experiments and observations will be discussed as well.

Speaker: Hui Li, Los Alamos National Labs

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/all-hands-deck-what-observations-theory-simulation-and-laboratory-experiments-are-teaching

Cost: Free

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Friday, 11/01/19
09:30 AM – 04:00 PM

Stanford Linear Accelerator
2575 Sand Hill Rd
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Fun Science at SLAC Tour

Join us at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for a 90-minute unique and family friendly tour experience. The tour will begin with a short film, “Making Science Happen,” then visitors will get a peek inside the lab’s facilities. Hear about the ways in which SLAC is a leading force in scientific innovation, and see science at work! Suggested age to participate is 7 years and up.

Tours at 9:30, 11:00, 1:00 and 2:30. RSVP needed. See weblink for password.

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/fun-science-at-slac-tour-2/

Cost: Free

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Friday, 11/01/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Benefits of sparsity in gravitational lens modeling

Speaker: Aymeric Galan

Lens monitoring and time-delay measurement for a precise determination of the Hubble constant

Speaker: Martin Millon, EPFL, Switzerland

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/galan-benefits-sparsity-gravitational-lens-modeling-million-lens-monitoring-and-time-delay

Cost: Free

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Friday, 11/01/19
04:00 PM – 06:30 PM

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
1 Cyclotron Road
Berkeley, CA 94720

Public Tour at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
BASF Logo

Have you ever wondered what happens at a government research facility? Are you interested in high energy physics, harnessing light, or nanoparticles? Join us for a tour at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and learn about the Lab’s long history of bringing science solutions to the world. Spend the afternoon getting up close and personal with our Advanced Light Source, talk with scientists and engineers about sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere, and dive into discussions about innovations in nanotechnology. Attendees need to be older than 16 years old.

RSVP at weblink

Shuttle service will be provided for registered attendees from downtown Berkeley. No public parking at the venue.

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/public-tour-at-lawrence-berkeley-national-laboratory-4/

Cost: Free

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Friday, 11/01/19. 5:30 PM

International House
UC Berkeley
Chevron Auditorium
Berkeley, CA 94720

A Discovery of Pulsars: A Graduate Student’s Tale

This year’s Emilio Segrè Lecture will be presented by Jocelyn Bell Burnell. In her presentation she will describe how pulsars were inadvertently discovered, describe some instances where they were ‘nearly’ discovered, and outline the properties of these amazing objects.

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20191101/2019-emilio-segre-lecture-featuring-jocelyn-bell-burnell

Cost: Free

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Friday, 11/01/19
06:00 PM – 07:00 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

50 Years Since Our First Step: What Do We Know about the Moon?
BASF Logo

July 2019 was the 50th anniversary of humanity’s first steps on the surface of the Moon. In that time, the Apollo missions, a fleet of robotic probes, and observations from Earth have taught us a lot about Earth’s surprising satellite. In this non-technical talk, Andrew Fraknoi will look at the past, present, and future of the Moon, including its violent origins, the mystery of the frozen water we have found at its poles, and its long-term future as it moves further and further away from us.

Speaker: Andrew Fraknoi, Univ of San Francisco and San Francisco State Univ.

RSVP at weblink

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/50-years-since-our-first-step-what-do-we-know-about-the-moon-2/

Cost: $5

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Friday, 11/01/19. 7:00 PM

San Mateo Co. Asronomical Society
College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Probing Fundamental Physics with Strong Gravitational Lensing

In general relativity, the presence of matter can curve spacetime, and the path of a light ray will be deflected as a result. This process is called gravitational lensing, analogous to the deflection of light by (e.g. glass) lenses in optics.In rare and extreme cases, light can take different paths to the observer and more than one image of the source will appear.Strong gravitational lensing is lensing that is strong enough to produce these multiple images, arcs, or even Einstein rings. Many useful results for cosmology have come out of using this phenomena.Dr Birrer will shed more light on how astronomers are utilizing strong gravitational lensing to probe the nature of dark matter and dark energy, the dominant but yet unknown components of our Universe.

Speaker: Simon Birrir, Stanford KIPAC

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/meetings.html

Cost: Free

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Fri, November 1, 7:15pm – 9:15pm

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
(3972 Twilight Dr
San Jose, CA 95124)

In Town Star Party

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early t…

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Fri. 11/01/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 11/01/2019 and Sat. 11/02/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri 11/01/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 11/02/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 11/02/19
07:00 PM – 09:00 PM

College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Jazz under the Stars

Come peer through our telescopes and see craters on the Moon, the visible planets, star clusters, and more while we listen to CSM’s very own KCSM Jazz 91 FM. Dress warmly. Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5. Directions are available on the Maps, Directions & Parking page.

This event is weather dependent. Latest weather updates.

Website: https://collegeofsanmateo.edu/astronomy/observatory.asp

Cost: Free

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Monday, 11/04/19. 12:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Baryon Cycles in the Biggest Galaxies

Speaker: Mark Voit, MSU

Website: https://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/

Cost: Free

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Monday, 11/04/19
07:30 PM – 09:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Celebrating 20 years with NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory

The launch of NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory in 1999 brought X-ray astronomy into the main stream, with 10 times the resolution and the ability to see objects 100 times fainter than previous x-ray satellites.

As Chandra celebrates its 20th year of operations, Dr. Wilkes will review some of the major discoveries and highlights of its scientific progress to date. This encompasses determining whether habitable exoplanets can survive the birth of their stars, to finding very distant supermassive black holes when the Universe was 10% of its current age, and everything in between: the birth and death of stars, merging galaxies and black holes, and unexpectedly chaotic clusters of galaxies.

What does the future hold for new Chandra scientific opportunities now and over the next decade, and what might follow Chandra when it ends its illustrious career?

Speaker: Belinda Wilkes, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/celebrating-20-years-with-nasas-chandra-x-ray-observatory-0

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members and Seniors

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Thursday, 11/07/19
07:00 PM – 10:00 PM

City Star Parties – Point Lobos Parking Lot
El Camino Del Mar
San Francisco, CA 94121

San Francisco City Star Party: Lands End @ Point Lobos, San Francisco, CA

Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.
Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/events/cat_ids~55/%22%3e%20City%20Star%20Parties/

Cost: Free

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Friday, 11/08/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

The Electromagnetic Counterparts of GW170817 and Future Gravitational Wave Events

Speaker: Kunal Mooley, NRAO and CalTech

TBD

Speaker: Meredith Powell, Stanford

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/mooley-electromagnetic-counterparts-gw170817-and-future-gravitational-wave-events-powell-tbd

Cost: Free

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Friday, 11/08/19. 7:30 PM

Peninsula Astronomical Society
Foothill College
Bldg. 5000, Room 5015 (our old venue)
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

July 2019 Solar Eclipse Experience

Members of the Peninsula Astronomical Society will share their experiences at the July 2019 solar eclipse.

Website: http://pastro.org/dnn/

Cost: Free ($3 parking)

==================================

Fri. 11/08/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 11/08/2019 and Sat. 11/09/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 11/08/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 11/09/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 11/09/19
09:00 AM – 03:00 PM

Foothill College Sunnyvale Center
1070 Innovation Way
Sunnyvale, CA 94089

Possible Self STEM Fair

A day of interactive, hands-on activities designed for 6th to 10th grade students and their families to Explore, Create, Make, and Learn about excitiing opportunities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM)

Website: https://stementorssv.org/possible-self-event/

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 11/09/19
07:30 PM – 09:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

Exploding Stars, Dark Energy, and the Runaway Universe

Some of the most energetic and fascinating objects in the Universe are exploding stars known as supernova. These colossal outbursts result from the deaths of stars and for a time can outshine the entire galaxy in which they’re found. Elements necessary for life are built up in stars during their lifetimes and are spread throughout space during these supernova explosions. Observations of distant supernova provided the first evidence that the expansion of the Universe is speeding up with time, rather than slowing down. This wholly unexpected phenomenon is likely due to a repulsive “dark energy” and has become one of the biggest unsolved mysteries in modern science.

Speaker: Jeffery Silverman, Samba TV

Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/265779459/

Cost: Free

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Monday, 11/11/19
06:45 AM – 10:00 AM

Foothill College Observatory
12345 El Monte Road
Building 2300, Hearthside Lounge
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Mercury Transit viewing from the Foothill Observatory

On Monday, November 11, the Foothill College Astronomy Department and the Peninsula Astronomical Society will be viewing the transit of Mercury. Join us at the Foothill Observatory (by parking lot 4) from sunrise at 6:44 a.m., when Mercury will already be in front of the sun, until the end of the transit just after 10 a.m.

Cost: Free ($3 parking)

==================================

Monday, 11/11/19
08:30 AM – 11:00 AM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

Mercury Transit Across The Sun

Now here’s something you don’t see every day. In fact, you won’t see it again until 2032!

This Monday morning, Mercury will temporarily move between the Earth and the Sun. This event is like a tiny solar eclipse, where Mercury will block part of the Sun from our perspective, and we will see Mercury move across the disk of the Sun over the course of a few hours.

Unfortunately, the transit starts before the Sun will rise, but from our vantage point in San Jose, we’ll be able to watch the last third of it.

Do not look at the Sun with your naked eyes (!) but we’ll have telescopes with special filters to make this spectacle safe to observe.

Along the way, we can also share with you a little about how the Sun works and how complex magnetic fields drive sunspots and prominences that we may get to see as well. And we’ll probably have some donuts, coffee and tea to make it easier to bear this early-morning event.

Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/265944456/

Cost: Free

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