Bay Astro – Events of Week of 10/07/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Monday, 10/07/19
04:15 PM – 05:15 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Searching for Axion Dark Matter Below 1 micro-eV: the Dark Matter Radio

One of the most enduring mysteries in particle physics is the nature of the non-baryonic dark matter that makes up 85% of the matter in the universe. The QCD axion, originally proposed as a solution to the strong CP problem in QCD, is one of the most strongly motivated candidates for dark matter. We will describe the search for QCD axion dark matter with mass below ~1 micro-eV. I discuss fundamental limits on searches for QCD axion dark matter coupled to electromagnetism, subject to the Standard Quantum Limit, and the Dark Matter Radio, an optimized electromagnetic experiment to probe the QCD axion.

Speaker: Kent Irwin, Stanford

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20191007/searching-for-axion-dark-matter-below-1-micro-ev-the-dark-matter-radio

Cost: Free

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Monday, 10/07/19 7:30 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Near Earth Asteroids, Space Missions, and the Impact Hazard

The near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) are a population of objects on orbit around the Sun that cross or come near the orbit of Earth; remnants of material from the early solar system that never accreted into planets. NEAs are accessible targets for space missions, but also pose a hazard due to potential future impacts onto Earth. Dr. Busch will review the near-Earth population and efforts to address the asteroid impact hazard. He will also discuss past, current, and future missions to near-Earth asteroids, including missions by NASA, ESA, JAXA, the Chinese National Space Agency, and potentially other groups.

Speaker: Michael Busch, SETI

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/near-earth-asteroids-space-missions-and-the-impact-hazard

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

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Tuesday, 10/08/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Modelling Exoplanets
Speaker: Laura Schaefer, Stanford

TBA
Speaker: Aurel Schneider, Univ. of Zurich

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/schaefer-modelling-exoplanets-schneider-tbd

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 10/08/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Analytic covariance of the redshift-space galaxy power spectrum
Speaker: Digvijay Wadekar, NYU

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 10/10/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
SLAC Fred Kavli Building (51) 3rd Fl Conference Room
2575 Sand Hill Rd
Menlo Park, CA 94305

Cosmological Weak Lensing

Weak gravitational lensing is a unique technique to map the distribution of dark matter in the universe. It is also a sensitive probe of dark energy, large scale structures in the universe, and cosmological parameters. We will first briefly describe the principles of weak lensing. We will then review the current observational status of this field, highlighting several new measurements especially from the ongoing Dark Energy Survey (DES). We will then discuss the status of tensions between cosmological probes, and a new approach based on forward modelling and machine learning.

Speaker: Alexandre Refreger, ETH Zurich

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/cosmological-weak-lensing

Cost: Free

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Friday, 10/11/19 12:00 PM

Earth and Marine Sciences Building
UC Santa Cruz
Room A340
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

Testing the Impact Hypothesis for Warming Early Mars

Speaker: Kathryn Steakley, NASA Ames

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/fall-2019.html

Cost: Free

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Friday, 10/11/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Blue Galaxies: Exploring the Origin of Nebular Emission in the Early Universe

Speaker: Kirk Barrow

Spinning and Connecting (in) the Cosmic Spiderweb

Speaker: Mark Neyrinck, Univ. of the Basque Country

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/barrow-blue-galaxies-exploring-origin-nebular-emission-early-universe-neyrinck-spinning-and

Cost: Free

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Fri. 10/11/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 10/11/2019 and Sat. 10/12/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri 10/11/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 10/12/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 10/12/19
10:00 AM – 01:30 PM

Fromm Hall
University of San Francisco, FR 110
2497 Golden Gate Ave
San Francisco, CA 94118

As Above As Below: Cosmic and Brain – DARK MATTER COSMIC ORIGAM WORKSHOP
As Above As Below is an Astro/Neuro/Art exhibit that aims to cultivate and optimize dialogue between artistic and scientific inquiry through collaborative exchanges.

In this Origami Workshop, Mark will guide you in building the nearby galaxies, called “The Council of Giants”, out of fabric and paper, and folding your own origami galaxies.

The exhibit runs: Oct 13 to Dec 15, 2019

Presented by: Mark Neyrinck, Astrophysicist

See our listing for the Opening Reception on Oct 13.

Website: https://www.asaboveasbelow.com

Cost: $10 suggested donation

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Sunday, Oct. 13 12 PM-3 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association Swap Meet
Houge Park (3972 Twilight Dr, San Jose, CA 95124)

This very low-key, flea market-like event. You can make your underused astronomy gear available to the local astronomy community, and make a couple bucks while you’re at it. If you are looking for gear, come by and see what’s available.

The swap meet will be held from 12 noon until about 3pm, depending on how quickly things slow down.

Details are posted at the link below. http://www.sjaa.net/swap-meet/

And finally, remember that this is a service to the local astronomy community.

Donations of 10% of sales to the SJAA are suggested.

website: https://www.sjaa.net/events/swap-meet/

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Monday, 10/14/19
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
Panofsky Auditorium
2575 Sand Hill Road
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Early days at SLAC – the quark discoveries

The first major experiments at SLAC were the electron proton scattering studies at End Station A in the late 60’s. The deep inelastic scattering yielded a complete surprise – the electrons were scattering off charged points in the proton. Follow up experiments showed the analogous behaviour for the neutron and determined charges and spin for the “partons” – they were the quarks of Gell-Mann and Zweig. A few years later, Charm was discovered at SPEAR, and the last doubters were convinced that quarks were real. This is the 50th anniversary of the first deep inelastic publications.

I will discuss early SLAC, these experiments, and some of the personalities as seen by a beginning physicist.

Speaker: Marty Breidenbach, SLAC

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/early-days-slac-the-quark-discoveries

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Wednesday, 10/16/19 7:00 PM

Silicon Valley Astronomy Lecture Series
Foothill College
Smithwick Theater
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Encounter with Ultima Thule: The Most Distant Object Humanity Has Ever Explored

After a successful encounter with Pluto, the New Horizons spacecraft, for the first time flew by a member of the Kuiper Belt of icy objects beyond Neptune. This particular object, officially called 2014MU69, but informally named “Ultimate Thule” (meaning the farthest place beyond the known world,) turned out to be a “contact binary” – two smaller icy worlds stuck together. Such objects are left over from the time our solar system was first coming together and provides scientists with a glimpse of what it was like here before the Earth even formed. Dr. Moore will share an insider’s view (with great images) of how the mission got to its targets and what we learned while passing by Ultima Thule.

Speaker: Jeff Moore, NASA Ames

Website: https://foothill.edu/events/?sr=2&rec_id=6495

Cost: Free ($3 parking)

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Wednesday, 10/16/19 7:45 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114

Exploring Planetary Surfaces with NASA’s Solar System Treks

Join Brian Day, of NASA’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, for a presentation on Exploring Planetary Surfaces with NASA’s Solar System Treks. Learn about NASA’s Solar System Treks project that is producing a suite of online interactive visualization and analysis portals. There are now seven web portals in the program available to the public. This list includes portals for the Moon, Mars, Vesta, Ceres, Titan, and recently Mercury. All of these are unified under a new project home site with supporting content. In this talk, Day will discuss ways that students and members of the public can use these portals to conduct their own explorations of planetary surfaces, measuring diameters of craters, creating elevation profiles of peaks and valleys, and plotting traverse paths.

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/monthly_lectures/randall/

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 10/17/19
05:00 PM – 06:45 PM

Cafe Scientifique Silicon Valley
HanaHaus
456 University Ave
Palo Alto, CA 94301

A Sharper Image: Seeing Colliding Galaxies with Adaptive Optics

Adaptive Optics is a technology that detects and corrects changing distortions in optical systems. It has been applied to great effect during the past decade to correct astronomical telescopes for blurring due to turbulence in the Earth’s atmosphere. This talk will describe how Adaptive Optics works, and how it is helping us to learn about colliding galaxies and their black holes, as well as outflows from the cores of nearby galaxy mergers.

Speaker: Claire Max, UC Santa Cruz

Website: http://www.cafescipa.org

Cost: Free

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Friday, 10/18/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Prospecting for quadruply lensed quasars in the past decade and the next

Quadruply lensed quasars (“quads”) are used to study several important astronomical problems, including the abundance of LIGO-mass primordial black holes. But quads are rare, with only one out of every 3000 quasars lensed into a quad. The alternative schemes used to identify them all have serious shortcomings of either an astrophysical or observational nature. The ground- and space-based surveys of the past decade have nonetheless yielded dozens of new quads. The surveys of the next decade will produce many hundreds. We discuss variouos different search techniques, some of which have until now proven productive and others of which are soon likely to be so.

Speaker: Paul Schechter, MIT

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/prospecting-quadruply-lensed-quasars-past-decade-and-next

Cost: Free

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Friday, 10/18/19
01:00 PM – 10:00 PM

San Francisco State University
Ceasar Chavez Student Center
1600 Holloway Ave
San Francisco, CA 94132

ASP2019 – Earth to Space, Celebrating a Century of Astronomy

Join the Astonomical Society of the Pacific in celebrating their 130th anniversary with speakers and activities for all.

Planetarium Shows

3:40 PM, 6:30 PM, 8:45 PM, 9:30 PM. Lines begin 30 minutes prior outside the planetarium. Thornton Hall.

Portable Planetarium

2:00 – 2:30 PM, 3:30 – 4:30 PM, 6:00 – 7:00 PM. Student Services Center Grassy Knoll

Night Sky Viewing

8:00 – 10:00 PM. Thornton Hall

Astronomy on Tap

6:00 – 7:30 PM. The Depot in Student Services Center

Lectures and Panels

All speaker events are in Jack Adams Hall, Cesar Chavez Student Center. Limited space, so come early.

Exploring the Moon: Past, Present, and Future 1:00 – 2:00 PM

Speaker: Kimberly Ennico Smith, NASA Ames

100 Earths 2:30 – 3:30 PM

Speakers: Debra Fischer, Yale University; John Brewer, San Francisco State

Astronomers for Planet Earth: Action for a Habitable World 4:30 – 5:45 PM

Panel: Debra Fischer, Yale University

Steve Richard, Climate Reality Project

Shawn Rosenmoss, San Francisco Dept of the Environment

Brandon Kline, San Francisco State Univ

Keynote Speaker: The Top Tourist Sites of the Solar System 7:30 – 8:30 PM

Using spectacular images from space probes and the world’s largest telescopes, Fraknoi will explore the most intriguing future “tourist destinations” among the planets and moons in our cosmic neighborhood. Stops will include the 4,000-mile lava channel on Venus, the towering Mount Olympus volcano on Mars (three times the height of Mount Everest), the awesome Verona Cliffs on the moon Miranda (which are the tallest “lover’s leap” in the solar system), and the recently discovered salt-water steam geysers on Saturn’s intriguing moon Enceladus (nicknamed “Cold Faithful.”)

Speaker: Andrew Fraknoi, Univ. of San Francisco

See weblink for additional information, maps, parking info, and speaker bio’s.

Website: https://astrosociety.org/get-involved/events/asp2019-earth-to-space/

Cost: Free

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Friday, 10/18/19 7:30 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers
1893 N. Vasco Rd
Unitarian Universalist Church
Livermore, CA 94551

Meteorites: Where do they come from and what are they made of?
Speaker: Bill Beiriger

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

Cost: Free

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Friday, October 18, 2019
7:30 PM to 9:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr · San Jose, CA
Near the tennis courts

Details
Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

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Fri. 10/18/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 10/18/2019 and Sat. 10/19/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 10/18/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 10/19/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 10/19/19
11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Exploring the local universe with the Hubble and James Webb Space Telescopes

Most galaxies are so far away that they appear to us only as faint smudges. However, for the nearest galaxies in our cosmic neighborhood, the clarity and sensitivity of the Hubble Space Telescope transforms them galaxies from smudges into spectacular collections of individual stars. These observations allow astronomers to study how galaxies form and evolve one star at a time. In this talk, I will highlight some of the amazing science and images produced by Hubble observations of local galaxies from the past three decades. The pinnacle of these studies is the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) program, an 800 hour Hubble survey of our sibling galaxy Andromeda, and one of the largest Hubble programs ever conducted. I will describe the PHAT survey and its scientific impact. I will discuss plans for James Webb Space Telescope, which will succeed Hubble as the most sensitive telescope in existence following its launch in 2021.

Speaker: Dan Weisz, UC Berkeley

Website: http://events.berkeley.edu/index.php/calendar/sn/sac.html?event_ID=128633&date=2019-10-19&filter=Event%20Type&filtersel=

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 10/19/19
05:00 PM – 09:00 PM

Stanford Linear Accelerator
Buildings 51 and 53
2575 Sand Hill Rd
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Community Day at KIPAC

The Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford is holding a Community Day open house. See weblink for details.

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/community-day

Cost: Free

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Saturday, October 19
Sunset: 6:28 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

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