Bay Astro – Events of Week of 11/18/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
==================================

Monday, 11/18/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Statistical Challenges in photometric redshift inference

Observations from large area photometric surveys like LSST or DES will constrain cosmology to unprecedented precision. Deep wide-area imaging will provide observations for faint galaxy samples, for which traditional redshift calibration using spectroscopic data is very difficult. It is therefore important to quantify and incorporate the modelling uncertainty in the parametrization of `systematics’ like photometric redshifts or galaxy-dark matter bias in Large-Scale Structure and Weak Lensing probes.
I will present our recent work on a Bayesian model combination approach that allows both a joint inference of these systematics, as well as a consistent treatment of their respective modelling biases. I will particularly discuss how the statistical inference can be scaled to the large galaxy samples in ongoing and future photometric surveys and incorporated into the current cosmological inference methodology.

Speaker: Markus Michael Rau, Carnegie Mellon University

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/statistical-challenges-photometric-redshift-inference

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 11/18/19 12:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Early light from Aspherical explosions

Speaker: Itai Linial, HUJI

Website: https://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 11/18/19
04:15 PM – 05:15 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

To the corona and back with a NASA spacecraft: the first perihelia of Parker Solar Probe

The solar wind is the superhot, escaping atmosphere of the Sun that has its origin in the solar corona and expands past the outer planets to form the heliosphere. However, for lack of direct measurements, the physical processes responsible for coronal heating and solar wind energization are not currently well known. The NASA Parker Solar Probe (PSP) mission was launched in 2018 into an orbit that will take it deep into the corona to make the first in situ measurements of these plasma physics phenomena. PSP is a feat of heroic thermal engineering and in its orbit around the Sun is the fastest ever human-made object. I will describe the PSP mission and scientific instrumentation and show some measurements from the first few perihelia at 35.7 solar radii. These measurements reveal an emerging solar wind characterized by smooth radial flow, with highly unstable plasma distributions, punctuated by plasma jets dragging along intense, highly kinked magnetic fields. Whereas the solar wind at 1 au is very different – mixed, homogeneous, and relatively stable.

Speaker: Stuart Bale, UC Berkeley

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20191118/to-the-corona-and-back-with-a-nasa-spacecraft-the-first-perihelia-of

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 11/19/19
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Physics and Astrophysics Building
Stanford University
452 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Camera systematics and three-point correlations in modern photometric galaxy surveys

The goal of modern cosmology is to understand the behavior of the universe at large scales, including the evolution of the matter distribution over cosmic time. Advances in this endeavor require both better characterization of systematic errors in raw astronomical data as well as improved statistical methods for extracting cosmological information from the galaxy catalogs produced by modern surveys. Toward these ends, I will begin by demonstrating a method for inferring the impact of pixel grid distortions in CCD imagers on fundamental astronomical observables. I will then present the results from applying this method to data from both the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and prototype sensors for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). In the second half of my talk, I will discuss a novel method for constraining linear and non-linear galaxy bias in photometric survey data using the galaxy three-point correlation function. This is a statistical probe of the “cosmic web” of dark matter, one that enables the extraction of more cosmological information from the observed galaxy distribution than is accessible with traditional two-point observables. I will show that the three-point correlation function is a useful probe of galaxy bias even in the presence of significant photometric redshift uncertainties. Both threads of this thesis will be useful in ongoing and upcoming analyses of data from photometric galaxy surveys, including DES and LSST.

Speaker: Michael Baumer

Thesis defense. Room 102/103

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/camera-systematics-and-three-point-correlations-modern-photometric-galaxy-surveys

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 11/19/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720
USA

Upcoming probes of fundamental physics: Utilising small-scale signatures in the Universe

In the next few years, the field of cosmology will see an influx of new and high quality data from surveys of cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large-scale structure (LSS). In particular, there is overwhelming evidence that measuring the late time effects on the CMB photons (secondaries) will provide new and valuable information for cosmological inference upon cross-correlating with LSS surveys. Simultaneously, surveys of the 21cm hydrogen line will achieve sufficient accuracy for cosmological inference for the fist time. In this talk, I will describe how these cosmological probes will provide opportunities to study fundamental problems. I will focus on the so-called ‘moving lens effect’, a CMB modulation due to changing gravitational potentials as a result of cosmological structure moving transverse to the line of sight (Hotinli et al 2019, PRL). I will also discuss prospects of utilising velocity acoustic oscillations (so-called VAOs) in the 21cm hydrogen line. I will describe how these observables can be used to constrain various classes of early Universe models beyond the standard LCDM.

Speaker: Selim Hotinli, Imperial

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 11/19/19
04:30 PM – 05:30 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 200
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

The Future of Particle Physics

Joseph D. Lykken of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory will give the Applied Physics/Physics colloquium

Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/future-particle-physics

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 11/19/19 7:30 PM

SLAC Public Lecture Series
2575 Sand Hill Road
Bldg 53, Panofsky Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

How to Bend a Stream of Dark Matter and Make it Shine

The nature of dark matter is one of the most captivating and fundamental open problems facing physicists today. Over many decades, we have collected overwhelming evidence for the existence of dark matter in the universe. Some of the strongest evidence comes from observations of the growth of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, from tiny clumps of matter at the earliest times to the vast patterns of stellar structures that we see in our telescopes today. These patterns are created by streams of dark matter coming together under the influence of their gravitational attraction. There are new ideas about dark matter in which these streams are not completely dark but, rather, can be coaxed into revealing themselves as they shine ever so faintly. This talk will review our knowledge of dark matter, and describe new methods for revealing its flow being developed here at SLAC.

Speaker: Sebastian Ellis, SLAC

Website: https://www6.slac.stanford.edu/public-lectures

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 11/19/19
07:15 PM – 09:00 PM

Mount Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Museum Community Room
1931 First Ave
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Astronomical Imaging Primer

Please join the Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society on November 19 for our general meeting featuring members of the MDAS Imaging Group, who will show off their images of the night sky and offer advice on getting started. What equipment do you need? What do you start with? What kind of software do you need? How different is it, really, from visual observing? Get answers to these and other questions.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astronomical-imaging-primer-tickets-80121843591?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 11/20/19 2:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Black Hole Superradiance Signatures of Ultralight Vectors

Black holes are useful tools in the search for Physics beyond the Standard Model. A particle lighter than 10^-11 eV has a Compton wavelength comparable to the horizon size of astrophysical black holes, and can form bound states around the black hole, similar to an atom. If the particle is bosonic, it can be produced by coherent enhancement around a rotating black hole through a process known as black hole superradiance. This process results in the exponential growth in occupation number of some bound states, while extracting energy and angular momentum from the black hole.

While black hole superradiance of scalar particles has been well-studied, vector particles put a spin on the dynamics and phenomenology. Vector bound states are qualitatively different, and can grow on timescales as short as a second around stellar black holes, up to a thousand times faster than their scalar counterparts. Once populated, the particles in these bound states annihilate to gravitons, producing continuous monochromatic gravitational radiation, which could be observed by current and future gravitational wave observatories. Advanced LIGO may measure up to thousands of annihilation signals from within the Milky Way, while black holes born in binary mergers across the observable universe may superradiate bosonic bound states and become new beacons of monochromatic gravitational waves.

Speaker: Mae Teo, Stanford

Thesis defense.

Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/physics-phd-dissertation-defense-mae-teo

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 11/20/19
04:00 PM – 05:00 PM

Los Gatos Library
100 Villa Ave
Los Gatos, CA 95030

The Century of Biology on Earth and Beyond

Are we alone? We want to know whether there is life beyond Earth and whether any of it is intelligent. Since the middle of the twentieth century, we have had astronomical tools that permit us to embark on a scientific exploration to try to answer this age-old question. Join Dr. Jill Tarter of the SETI Institute to learn about our search for extraterrestrial intelligence.

Speaker: Jill Tarter, co-founder of the SETI Institute

Website: https://seti.org/event/century-biology-earth-and-beyond

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 11/20/19
07:00 PM – 08:00 PM

SETI Institute: SETI Talks
SRI International
333 Ravenswood Ave
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Technosignatures vs. Biosignatures: Which Will Succeed First?

Thirty-five years ago, a group of entrepreneurs and scientists founded the SETI Institute �” the first scientific institute dedicated to the search for extraterrestrial life in the universe. We’re excited to commemorate this anniversary. We invited SETI Institute co-founder Jill Tarter and 2018 Drake Award Recipient Vikki Meadows to discuss the challenges and possible future strategies for the detection of life.

Initiated by Jill Tarter in 1990s, Project Phoenix marked the first systematic search for technosignatures. Today, the Allen Telescope Array and Laser SETI are driving our technosignature search.

The discovery that exoplanets are common has radically changed our view of the universe. The likelihood that there are habitable worlds elsewhere in the universe seems more plausible than ever before. Astronomers, including Vikki Meadows, are developing new instruments to help search for life on other planets. By analyzing data from exoplanets and identifying biosignatures, we will be able to search for habitable planets and the presence of life.

Which approach will discover the first evidence of extraterrestrial life? Will technosignatures or biosignatures confirm our hypothesis that life exists outside our watery, shimmering planet and that, indeed, we are not alone?

Website: https://seti.org/event/technosignatures-vs-biosignatures-which-will-succeed-first

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 11/20/19
07:30 PM – 09:30 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114

Celestial Mapping and the Amateur Astronomer

Discover how the history of celestial cartography has evolved into several pathways that have relevance for today’s amateur astronomer. Dr. Nick Kanas will trace the history of ancient star mapping traditions, discuss the beautiful images of constellations pictured in early atlases, and explain how the development and use of the telescope influenced mapping, along with other significant developments that many amateur astronomers take for granted.

Speaker: Nick Kanas, UC San Francisco, Emeritus

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/monthly_lectures/randall/

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 11/21/19 3:45 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

A magnetic perspective on the interiors of giant planets

Speaker: Hao Cao, Harvard

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/news/events/astronomy-colloquium/

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 11/22/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

A 1700 km/s hyper velocity star discovered by the Southern Stellar Stream Spectroscopic Survey

Speaker: Ting Li, Carnegie Observatories

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/1700-kms-hyper-velocity-star-discovered-southern-stellar-stream-spectroscopic-survey

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 11/22/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@… or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 11/22/2019 and Sat. 11/23/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 11/22/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 11/23/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Sat. 11/23/2019

Sunset: 4:54 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Soc.
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park in San Carlos
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

==================================

Monday, 11/25/19 12:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

FOGGIE: Exploring the Circumgalactic Medium in High Resolution

Speaker: Lauren Corlies, LSST

Website: https://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 11/25/19
04:15 PM – 05:15 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Constraints on Quantum Gravity

Although predictions of quantum gravity are typically at extremely high energy, over the last decades several non-trivial constraints on its low energy effective theory have been found. I will start by explaining why the unification of general relativity and quantum mechanics has been difficult. After introducing the holographic principle as our guide to the unification, I will discuss its use in finding constraints on symmetry in quantum gravity. I will also discuss other conjectures on low energy effective theories, collectively called swampland conditions, and their consequences.

Speaker: Hirosi Ooguri, Caltech

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20191125/constraints-on-quantum-gravity

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 11/29/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@… or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 11/29/2019 and Sat. 11/30/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 11/29/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 11/30/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 11/30/19
05:30 PM – 07:30 PM

College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Jazz under the Stars

Come peer through our telescopes and see craters on the Moon, the visible planets, star clusters, and more while we listen to CSM’s very own KCSM Jazz 91 FM. Dress warmly. Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5. Directions are available on the Maps, Directions & Parking page.

This event is weather dependent. Latest weather updates.

Website: https://collegeofsanmateo.edu/astronomy/observatory.asp

Cost: Free

Written by

No Comments Yet.

Leave a Reply