Bay Astro – Events of Week of 12/02/2019 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
==================================

Monday, 12/02/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Precision Cosmology with the Cosmic Microwave Background

The cosmic microwave background (CMB) provides unparalleled views into the early universe and its later evolution. Recent and ongoing experiments have contributed to our understanding of neutrinos, dark energy, and dark matter through measurements of large scale structure imprinted on the CMB and constrained the conditions in the early universe, tightly restricting inflationary and other cosmological models through measurements of CMB polarization. Next-generation CMB experiments will further constrain the sum of the neutrino masses and the number of relativistic species, expand our understanding of dark energy and dark matter, and set new constraints on cosmological models describing the first moments of the universe. The polarization in the CMB is faint, so future experiments must be at least an order of magnitude more sensitive. Additionally, both polarized foregrounds from synchrotron and dust emission and systematic effects from the instruments can create spurious polarization signals. Characterizing and removing foregrounds requires wide frequency coverage, while systematic effects must be modeled, mitigated, and calibrated at unprecedented levels. I will discuss several advances in instrumentation and modeling that will be critical for this leap in performance.

Speaker: Sara Simon, Univ. of Michigan

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/precision-cosmology-cosmic-microwave-background

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 12/02/19  12:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Orbital Circularization of Binaries with Resonance Locking from Stellar Evolution
Speaker: J. J. Zanazzi, CITA

Website: https://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 12/02/19  12:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The Dynamics of Warped Accretion Disks: From Planet Formation to Tidal Disruption Events of Stars around Supermassive Black Holes

Speaker: J. JU. Zanazzi, CITA

Website: https://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 12/02/19
07:30 PM – 09:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Humpback Whale Song as an Intelligence Filter for SETI

We have been applying the mathematics of information theory – originally developed for human communication systems and computers – to humpback whales in order to measure the complexity of their vocalizations. Is their “language” as complex as ours, or even more complex? Are there general rules for communicating knowledge that even messages from extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) will have to obey?

As astrobiology uses Antarctica as a proxy for Mars, so we are using non-human but complex communication systems as a proxy for an ETI signal if and when one may be received. Humpback whales grew up on the same planet, and around the same star, as humans did, but their communication systems are certainly not human! Thus we can deprovincialize our thinking and approach to the detection of intelligent life in space.

Speaker: Laurance Doyle, SETI

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/humpback-whale-song-as-an-intelligence-filter-for-seti

Cost:  $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

==================================

Tuesday, 12/03/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Measuring the tensor-to-scalar ratio using the polarization of the cosmic microwave background

Speaker: Neil Goeckner-Wald, Stanford

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/measuring-tensor-scalar-ratio-using-polarization-cosmic-microwave-background

Cost:  Free

==================================

Tuesday, 12/03/19  1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Accurate and precise cosmological constraints from the large-scale structure of galaxy clustering

Ongoing and future galaxy surveys, e.g., DESI, Euclid, WFIRST, etc., are going to collect >100M galaxy redshifts and reach sub-percentage precision on the cosmological measurements, e.g., Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, growth rates of large-scale structure, etc. We look forward to obtaining tighter constraints on the cosmological parameters, e.g., Hubble constant, equation of state of dark energy, etc. But meanwhile, we have to ask: are we ready to analyze such a massive data set? Are we sure that the systematics are under control? In this talk, I will report on what we have done and been doing towards this goal.

Speaker: Chia-Hsun Chuang, Stanford

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost:  Free

==================================

Tuesday, 12/03/19
07:00 PM – 07:45 PM

Fremont Main Library
2400 Stevenson Blvd
Fremont, CA 94538

Science at the Library: Reaching for the Stars

Looking up in the night time sky you see many points of light.  Many are stars that can be found within our galaxy, the Milky Way.  Only a few points of lights are far away galaxies.  Learn about constellations and how they are used by astronomers.

There are 4 activities at each presentation after a show presentation. Parents work with their children to learn about science.  Recommended  for elementary age children.

Website: http://msnucleus.org/classes/libraryevents.html

Cost:  Free

==================================

Thursday, 12/05/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Physics and Astrophysics Building Room 102/103
452 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Exoplanets

Speaker: Quinn Konopacky, UC San Diego

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/exoplanets

Cost:  Free

==================================

Thursday, 12/05/19  3:45 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

UC Berkeley Astronomy Collquium

Welcome to the Milky Way! Gaia, the Galaxy and me

Speaker: Kathryn Johnston, Columbia Univ.

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/news/events/astronomy-colloquium/

Cost:  Free

==================================

Thursday, 12/05/19  4:00 PM

Room LBL-50-5132
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
1 Cyclotron Road
Berkeley, CA 94720
21cm Intensity Mapping: A New Cosmological Tool?

The 21 cm line from neutral hydrogen gas has many useful properties for mapping large volumes of the cosmos. These maps will give us a view of the Universe when the first luminous objects formed through gravity – the Cosmic Dawn and the Epoch of Reionization, and later, the post-Reionization Universe. They may even allow us to map the epoch before these luminous objects, the cosmic dark ages. The large volumes of these maps promise dramatic improvements in estimation of cosmological parameters. Data is flowing now from a new generation of radio telescopes optimized for this task. Unfortunately, the main challenge for all of them is that the astrophysical radio foregrounds are ~10,000 times brighter than the expected hydrogen signal. In this talk I will focus on current and planned efforts to use the new technique of` ‘hydrogen intensity mapping’ to make tomographic maps of the post-Reionization universe. In particular, I will describe the first measurements from an instrument in China, called the Tianlai (‘Cosmic Sound’) Pathfinder.

Speaker: Peter Timbie, Uinv. of Wisconsin

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost:  Free

==================================

Friday, 12/06/19
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Two KIPAC Tea Talks:

==============

FOBOS Instrument

Speaker: Kevin Bundy, UC Santa Cruz

===============

Large Scale Dynamo in a Primordial Accretion Flow

Speaker: Wei-Ting Liao, Univ. of Illinois

===============

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/bundy-fobos-instrument-liao-tbd

Cost:  Free

==================================

Friday, 12/06/19  12:00 PM

Room LBL-50-5132
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
1 Cyclotron Road
Berkeley, CA 94720

Cosmology with the Lya forest: beyond two-point statistics, DESI instrumentation

The Lyman-alpha forest is currently the only probe of cosmology and the state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) between redshifts of z=2 and 6. Its higher-order clustering, specifically its three-point correlation function (3PCF), contains information that can help to constrain fluctuations in the ionizing background and temperature fields of the IGM, thus providing a novel way to constrain their effects on cosmological analyses of the LyA forest. In this talk, I will present theoretical predictions of the 3PCF of the LyA forest, considering both a uniform and spatially varying UV background. I will discuss the exciting possibilities that future surveys like DESI will enable in this area. Finally, I will present my instrumentation work on the DESI sky camera and the fiber positioner anti-collision algorithm, and how they facilitate the DESI survey to achieve its science goals.

Speaker: Suk Sien Tie, OSU

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost:  Free

==================================

Friday, 12/06/19  7:00 PM

Hip Hop Juice Box
3960 Adeline St
Emeryville, CA 94608

The Dark Matter of Physics Rap

Rap is the language of the youth. Science is a way to expand our understanding of the universe. As the Genius of the Wu Tang Clan, GZA’s proposes to combine these two disparate concepts into his anticipated album, Dark Matter. Some predict it will be corny, but a closer look at the science behind GZA’s vision reveals compelling stories beyond imagination.

Speaker: Thomas Mittiga, UC Berkeley

Website: http://scienceatcal.berkeley.edu/grounds-for-science-the-dark-matter-of-physics-rap/

Cost:  Free

==================================

Friday, 12/06/19  8:00 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Dwarfs: Failed Stars or Overachieving Planets?

Giant planets can be up to 13 times the mass of Jupiter, while the least massive stars are about 80 times the mass of Jupiter. In between are objects called “brown dwarfs” too massive to be called planets, but not massive enough to burn hydrogen and shine like stars. Since 1994, a few thousand brown dwarfs have been observed close to us inthe galaxy. But, what are they?Are they more like half-pint cousins of stars, or more like overgrown planets?In this lecture, Eric Nielsen, a research scientist in the Kavli Institute of Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University, willexplain how we observe and study brown dwarfs and what we have learned about them. It will describe clues to their nature from their composition and their evolution over time, and the insights they give us into how stars and planets are born.

Speaker: Eric Nielson, Stanford University

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/meetings.html

Cost:  Free

==================================

Fri, December 6, 7pm – 9pm

In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr,
San Jose, CA 95124

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 12/06/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

==================================

Fri. 12/06/2019 and Sat. 12/07/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 12/06/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 12/07/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 12/07/19
05:30 PM – 07:30 PM

College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Jazz under the Stars

Come peer through our telescopes and see craters on the Moon, the visible planets, star clusters, and more while we listen to CSM’s very own KCSM Jazz 91 FM. Dress warmly. Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5. Directions are available on the Maps, Directions & Parking page.

This event is weather dependent. Latest weather updates.

Website: https://collegeofsanmateo.edu/astronomy/observatory.asp

Cost:  Free

==================================

Saturday, 12/07/19
07:00 PM – 10:00 PM

City Star Parties – Parade Grounds at the Presidio
103 Montgomery St.
Main Post Lawn
San Francisco, CA 94129

City Star Party @ The Presidio

Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.
Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/event/san-francisco-city-star-party-presidio-3/?instance_id=1595

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 12/09/19
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

The probability distribution function (PDF) of cosmic density fluctuations: How to measure it? How to model it? What information does it contain?

In this talk I will lead you through the highlights of a series of papers (Gruen++2018, Friedrich++2018, Friedrich&Uhlemann et al. in prep, Uhlemann&Friedrich et al. in prep) that promote an alternative framework of studying large scale structure data: analysis of the 1-point PDF of density fluctuations. The main difference between the PDF and 2-point correlation functions is readily explained: 2-point functions measure the variance of fluctuations as a function of scale, while the PDF measures all moments of the fluctuations at one scale. But how would you ever measure the PDF in real data? How would you model it theoretically? And to what physics is it sensitive to? The talk will give a number of answers to these questions.

Speaker: Oliver Friedrich, Univ. of Cambridge

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/probability-distribution-function-pdf-cosmic-density-fluctuations-how-measure-it-how-model

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 12/09/19  12:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Origins of the Astrophysical r-process

Speaker: J. Barnes, Columbia Univ.

Website: Click to Visit

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 12/09/19
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
2575 Sand Hill Rd, Building 51
Kavli Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Seeing the invisible: music, art and an evolutionary step

In a 1954 paper “Galileo as a critic of the arts”,  Erwin Panofsky wrote that the Florentine’s culture in which Galileo lived, his participation  in the visual arts, literature and music communities that at the time made Florence a leading European intellectual center, nurtured his pioneering scientific work, an important step toward  modern science and the exploration of the universe. Working with his father Vincenzio, part of the movement that revolutionized music and created opera at the end of the XVI century, the young Galileo was introduced to experimental studies of how the sound from a vibrating string depends on length, tension and mass. Following Panofsky we look at the similarity between Galileo’s scientific approach and his analysis and appreciation of art and literature and discuss how his knowledge of visual arts had a large impact on his observations of the Moon and Venus and the beginning of modern astronomy.

Speaker: Claudio Pellegrini, SLAC

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/seeing-the-invisible-music-art-and-evolutionary-step

Cost:  Free

==================================

Tuesday, 12/10/19
07:30 PM – 10:30 PM

DNA Lounge
375 11th St
San Francisco, CA 94103

Astronomy on Tap: San Francisco

Astronomy on Tap San Francisco is back! Come to DNA Lounge on Tuesday, Dec. 10th for another night of talks from local scientists, Astronomy in the News, trivia and prizes! Come out to hear about the latest updates on all things astrophysics, from exoplanets to jets! Doors open at 7:00 pm, and the event starts at 7:30pm. For updates, please follow our Twitter and our event on Facebook. Also check out our page on the Astronomy on Tap website for more! Remember, space is always better with beer!

Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/1784212298378171/

==================================

Friday, 12/13/19
11:00 PM – 03:00 AM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

Geminid Meteor Shower

Starting at dusk, spectators should be able to spot 50-100 meteors per hour, with the show peaking around 2 a.m. Astronomers will be on site to answer any questions. In addition, guests can enjoy hot chocolate and other goodies available for purchase. Limited capacity. Pre-registration is recommended.

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/geminid-meteor-shower-2

Cost:  $8

==================================

Fri. 12/13/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

==================================

Fri. 12/13/2019 and Sat. 12/14/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 12/13/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 12/14/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Written by

No Comments Yet.

Leave a Reply