Bay Astro – Events of Week of 01/08/2018 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Tuesday, 01/09/18 4:30 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 200
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Quantum vs. Classical Optimization: A Status Update on the Arms Race
Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium

Speaker: Helmut Katzgraber, Texas A&M

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 01/10/18
07:30 PM – 09:30 PM

PianoFight
144 Taylor Street
San Francisco, CA 94102

Dark Energy, Getting to Mars and Protecting Coral Reefs

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How to Get (More of Us) To Mars?

We are going to Mars – but how? More importantly, who gets to go?

We will take a look at the usual suspects (Musk, Bezos, NASA), but will also consider less conventional ways humans can get their Mars on. Above all, we will argue for diversity – and cheaper fares – for future Mars expeditions.

Speaker: Jan Millsapps, San Francisco State

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Exploding Stars, Dark Energy, and the Runaway Universe

Some of the most energetic and fascinating objects in the Universe are exploding stars called supernova. These colossal outbursts result from the deaths of stars and can outshine the entire galaxy in which they’re found.

Observations of distant supernova provided the first evidence that the expansion of the Universe is speeding up with time. This wholly unexpected phenomenon is likely due to a repulsive “dark energy” and has become one of the biggest unsolved mysteries in modern science.

Speaker: Jeffrey Silverman, SAMBA TV

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Protecting Coral Reefs

Speaker: Luiz Rocha, Calif Academy of Sciences

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Website: https://tasteofscience.org/san-francisco-events/mars-dark-energy-coral-reefs

Cost: $7 advance, $10 at door

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Friday, 01/12/18
07:30 PM – 10:30 PM

Montgomery Hill Observatory
Evergreen Valley College
3095 Yerba Buena Rd
San Jose, CA 95135

Free Public Stargazing
View Moon, bright planet, Venus, red planet, Mars, Pleiades (Seven sisters or Subaru), Andromeda Galaxy, Orion Nebula , Crab Nebula , Double cluster in Perseus, star cluster Hyades, Pleiades, “Owl” cluster, Beehive cluster, bright stars Rigel, Betelgeuse, Sirius, Aldebaran and many more objects.

Facility has an 8 inch refractor telescope in a dome observatory, 14 inch SC telescope in a roll off roof observatory and several other telescopes set out for the public.

Website: http://evc-cit.info/astronews/free-public-stargazing-night-january-12-2018/

Cost: Free

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Friday, January 12, 2018
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr · San Jose, CA
Near the tennis courts

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

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Fri. 01/12/2018 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 01/12/2018 and Sat. 01/13/2018

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 01/12/2018 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 01/13/2018 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA.. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 1/13/2018
Sunset: 5:13 PM

Public Star Parties with the
San Mateo County Astronomical Society
at Crestview Park in San Carlos
1000 Crestview Drive, San Carlos, CA

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset.. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, high winds or uncomfortably cold weather) the star party might not take place. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

==================================

Tuesday, 01/16/18
07:00 PM – 09:00 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Observation Post/Building 211
211 Lincoln Blvd
San Francisco, CA 94129

An Evening with the San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Join us in our 66th year for a special evening with SFAA. Enjoy extra time for snacks and meet & greet, as we share our experiences with you in a more informal setting.

Hear short talks on what is in the future for amateur astronomy, discover how to share your dark sky experiences, get tips on how to plan observing sessions, and much more. Meet the people who help make SFAA such a great organization, and plan to join us for the exciting activities planned in 2018.

The speakers are SFAA members Tom Kellogg, Scott Miller and Michael Portuesi. Tom Kellogg who will speak on Sidewalk Astronomy. Scott Miller is speaking on the exciting future of amateur astronomy with his 3-D printed telescope and also the new Unistellar Telescope. Past SFAA president, Mike Portuesi will speak about planning a night of observing and if there is time, he may also talk a bit about sketching at the eyepiece.

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/monthly_lectures/presidio/

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 01/18/18 8:00 PM
Part of After Dark, 6:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Exploratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

Everything Matters: Iron
Earth’s most common element by mass, iron has been employed since antiquity to create tools, weapons, and works of art. Join master blacksmith James Austin to explore iron’s historical importance and amazing metallurgical properties – as well as the air of mystery surrounding the blacksmithing trade.

Speaker: James Austin, blacksmith

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/after-dark-thursday-january-18-2018

Cost: Free with After Dark Admission

==================================

Thurs. 1/18/2018 7:30PM

Bankhead Theater
2400 First St.
Livermore, CA

*PHYSICIST DAVID SHOEMAKER TO DISCUSS ‘NEW WORLD OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVES’
THAT PROMISES NEW UNDERSTANDING OF COSMOS*

Livermore, Calif. — Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
physicist David Shoemaker will present “Gravitational Waves — The New
Cosmic Messenger” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 18 at the Bankhead Theater
in Livermore.

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, called LIGO,
measured gravitational waves from the merger of two black holes in 2015,
inaugurating a new era for gravitational-wave astronomy. This was the
first direct measurement of gravitational waves — the ripples in
space-time predicted by Albert Einstein more than 100 years ago in his
general theory of relativity. Shoemaker will provide updated
information from the second observing period that ended in the summer
of 2017.

“The window to this new world of gravitational waves has just been
cracked open … We’ll be rewarded with discoveries that will give us all
a thrill of understanding things much bigger than ourselves,” Shoemaker,
project leader for Advanced LIGO and director of the LIGO Lab at the
MIT, told a US Congressional panel in 2016, according to the magazine of
the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE).

Shoemaker is also a senior research scientist in MIT’s Kavli Institute,
as well as a visiting associate at the California Institute of
Technology. In March of 2017, he was appointed spokesperson for the
international LIGO collaboration, which includes 1,000 scientists and
engineers in 15 countries. He received a Masters in Physics from MIT in
1980 and a Ph.D in Physics from the Université de Paris in 1987. He has
worked in the field of gravitational-wave detection since 1980.

For additional information, see the Rae Dorough Speaker Series Website:
http://raedoroughspeakerseries.org/

Tickets are available for the remaining speakers in the series as well
as for individual presentations. Individual presentation tickets are $16
for students and range from $32 to $40 for adults. Tickets are now
available online http://raedoroughspeakerseries.org/tickets/ or may be
purchased at the Bankhead Theater box office, 2400 First Street,
Livermore, Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 6 p.m., or by calling
(925)-373-6800.

The speaker series honors the late Rae Dorough, a respected Livermore
resident and strong supporter of cultural events.. Members of her family
were the initiating sponsors in 2008. The series is sponsored in part by
Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, The Hertz Foundation, Sandia
National Laboratory, Tri-Valley Conservancy and ImageSetters.

The speaker programs begin at 7:30 p.m., followed by a lively audience
question and answer (Q&A) from the stage, and culminate in a reception
for the speaker that is held in the lobby of the Bankhead.

*http://raedoroughspeakerseries.org/*
*http://www.facebook.com/RaeDoroughSpeakers*

*Tickets – 925.373.6800 or www.bankheadtheater.org
| PO Box 592 | Livermore | CA 94551*

==================================

Friday, 01/19/18 7:00 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers
1893 N. Vasco Rd
Unitarian Universalist Church
Livermore, CA 94551

Going Deep — Challenging Observing Projects for the Intrepid Amateur
Speaker: Steve Gottlieb

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 01/19/2018 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 01/19/2018 and Sat. 01/20/2018

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 01/19/2018 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 01/20/2018 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 1/20/2018
Sunset: 5:21 PM

Public Star Parties with the
San Mateo County Astronomical Society
at Crestview Park in San Carlos
1000 Crestview Drive, San Carlos, CA

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome.. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset.. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, high winds or uncomfortably cold weather) the star party might not take place. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

==================================

Monday, 01/22/18 7:00 PM

Alamo Drafthouse New Mission Theater
2250 Mission St
San Francisco, CA 94110

Science Vs Cinema: ‘GALAXY QUEST’
Science Vs Cinema is a new monthly series exploring the awesome science behind your favorite movies. We’ll explore what’s right, what’s wrong, and why the scientist always seems to be the first one to die in so many films. Get ready for a way-too-deep dive into the science – from the physics of spaceflight to the biology of vampires and everything in between. No movie is off limits – cult faves, Hollywood blockbusters, hidden gems. Look for surprise guest scientists and embarrassing science-themed costumes. Hosted by science communicator Kishore Hari and astrophysicist Jeff Silverman. Making movies better with science!

Following the film, Kishore Hari (@sciencequiche) and Jeffrey Silverman (@J_M_Silverman) will discuss some of the science behind the fiction, including:

– What Earth TV shows are aliens watching right now?
– How heavy is that Beryllium sphere?
– Can you really travel through black holes?
– Is that alien atmosphere breathable?
– IS THERE AIR? YOU DON’T KNOW!

Website: https://drafthouse.com/sf/show/science-vs-cinema-galaxy-quest

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