Bay Astro – Events of Week of 01/01/2018 and Beyond

This Yahoo group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Thursday, 01/04/18
06:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Exploratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

After Dark: Bright and Shiny

Get your razzle-dazzle on and explore nature’s brilliance from the gleam of an insect’s wing to the brightest stars in
the sky. Listen to steelpan music, play with prisms and lasers, and reflect on illuminating artworks.

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A Light History of the Universe with Linda Shore
7:00 p.m. | Kanbar Forum
Join Dr. Linda Shore to explore the cosmic brilliance that enables scientists to detect dark planets, observe centuries-old supernova explosions, and trace the natural history of the universe from the residue of past
events.

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Lightbulb Skinny Dipping with Zeke Kossover
6:30, 7:30, 8:30, and 9:30 p.m. | East Gallery
Most light bulbs lead boring lives in electrical sockets, and yet they crave adventure. Join Exploratorium science teacher Zeke Kossover to find out what happens when lightbulb wishes are fulfilled with a dip in liquid nitrogen.

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Lustrous Insects with Ralph Washington, Jr.
6:30-9:30 p.m. | East Gallery Corridor
Meet with entomologist Ralph Washington, Jr. to explore how bright color and shiny surfaces help insects attract mates, escape predators, and trick prey and how lustrous insects have inspired art, jewelry, and textiles around the world.

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Laser Science with Ron Hipschman
9:00 p.m. | Kanbar Forum
In 1960, the laser was known as “a solution looking for a problem.” Now we can hardly imagine life without them. Learn what’s special about laser light, how it’s made, and how it’s used in everything from DVD players to eye surgery to fusion energy research.

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See weblink for additional program info and AFTER DARK MEMBERSHIP it’s a great deal.

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/after-dark-thursday-january-4-2018

Cost: $17.95 advance, $19.95 at the door

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Fri. 01/05/2018 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

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Fri. 01/05/2018 and Sat. 01/06/2018

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri. 01/05/2018 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 01/06/2018 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 01/06/18 7:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

Watching Our Universe Grow Up: Radio Snapshots Through Cosmic Time

How did the first generation of stars and galaxies form in our Universe? Astronomers don’t know. We have ideas, to be sure, but they’re hard to confirm with observations because prior to the formation of the first stars and galaxies, it’s not clear what we can look at! In the last few years, much progress has been made in trying to detect radio waves from hydrogen atoms that existed in the early Universe. The existence of hydrogen precedes the formation of the first stars and galaxies, and therefore allows direct observations of the formation process. This new technique (known as “21cm cosmology”) has yet to become a standard tool in the astronomical community. In this talk, I will provide a “sneak preview” of what will come in the next few years, as 21cm cosmology revolutionizes our understanding of how our present Universe with its majestic astronomical patterns consisting of mature stars, galaxies, and even larger objects—came to be.

Speaker: Dr. Adrian Liu, UCB

Cost: Free

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Sunday, 01/07/18 7:00 PM

Hopmonk Tavern
224 Vintage Way
Novato, CA 94945

COSMIC GOLD: Neutron Star Mergers, Gravitational Waves, & the Origin of the Heavy Elements

Scientists have recently developed an entirely new way to “see” the universe: using gravitational wavespredicted by Einstein nearly a century ago. These waves can teach us about some of the most exotic objects known, including black holes and neutron stars. Remarkably, they have also helped solve a longstanding puzzle about where in the universe some of the elements we know and love here on Earth are produced, including gold, platinum, uranium, and even californium!

Speaker: Astronomer Eliot Quataert will describe the remarkable new results coming out of our first steps into the gravitational wave era of cosmic exploration.

Website: http://wonderfest.org/cosmic-gold-gravitational-waves-jan7/

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 01/09/18 4:30 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 200
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Quantum vs. Classical Optimization: A Status Update on the Arms Race
Applied Physics/Physics Colloquium

Speaker: Helmut Katzgraber, Texas A&M

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 01/10/18
07:30 PM – 09:30 PM

PianoFight
144 Taylor Street
San Francisco, CA 94102

Dark Energy, Getting to Mars and Protecting Coral Reefs

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How to Get (More of Us) To Mars?

We are going to Mars – but how? More importantly, who gets to go?

We will take a look at the usual suspects (Musk, Bezos, NASA), but will also consider less conventional ways humans can get their Mars on. Above all, we will argue for diversity – and cheaper fares – for future Mars expeditions.

Speaker: Jan Millsapps, San Francisco State

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Exploding Stars, Dark Energy, and the Runaway Universe

Some of the most energetic and fascinating objects in the Universe are exploding stars called supernova. These colossal outbursts result from the deaths of stars and can outshine the entire galaxy in which they’re found.

Observations of distant supernova provided the first evidence that the expansion of the Universe is speeding up with time. This wholly unexpected phenomenon is likely due to a repulsive “dark energy” and has become one of the biggest unsolved mysteries in modern science.

Speaker: Jeffrey Silverman, SAMBA TV

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Protecting Coral Reefs

Speaker: Luiz Rocha, Calif Academy of Sciences

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Website: https://tasteofscience.org/san-francisco-events/mars-dark-energy-coral-reefs

Cost: $7 advance, $10 at door

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Friday, 01/12/18
07:30 PM – 10:30 PM

Montgomery Hill Observatory
Evergreen Valley College
3095 Yerba Buena Rd
San Jose, CA 95135

Free Public Stargazing
View Moon, bright planet, Venus, red planet, Mars, Pleiades (Seven sisters or Subaru), Andromeda Galaxy, Orion Nebula , Crab Nebula , Double cluster in Perseus, star cluster Hyades, Pleiades, “Owl” cluster, Beehive cluster, bright stars Rigel, Betelgeuse, Sirius, Aldebaran and many more objects.

Facility has an 8 inch refractor telescope in a dome observatory, 14 inch SC telescope in a roll off roof observatory and several other telescopes set out for the public.

Website: http://evc-cit.info/astronews/free-public-stargazing-night-january-12-2018/

Cost: Free

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Friday, January 12, 2018
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr · San Jose, CA
Near the tennis courts

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 01/12/2018 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at rozer@pacbell.net or phone (510) 406-1914.

==================================

Fri. 01/12/2018 and Sat. 01/13/2018

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 01/12/2018 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3..00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 01/13/2018 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Colllege Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Tuesday, 01/16/18
07:00 PM – 09:00 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Observation Post/Building 211
211 Lincoln Blvd
San Francisco, CA 94129

An Evening with the San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Join us in our 66th year for a special evening with SFAA. Enjoy extra time for snacks and meet & greet, as we share our experiences with you in a more informal setting.

Hear short talks on what is in the future for amateur astronomy, discover how to share your dark sky experiences, get tips on how to plan observing sessions, and much more. Meet the people who help make SFAA such a great organization, and plan to join us for the exciting activities planned in 2018.

The speakers are SFAA members Tom Kellogg, Scott Miller and Michael Portuesi. Tom Kellogg who will speak on Sidewalk Astronomy. Scott Miller is speaking on the exciting future of amateur astronomy with his 3-D printed telescope and also the new Unistellar Telescope. Past SFAA president, Mike Portuesi will speak about planning a night of observing and if there is time, he may also talk a bit about sketching at the eyepiece.

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/monthly_lectures/presidio/

Cost: Free

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