BayAstro – Events of Week of 01/06/2020 and Beyond

The BayAstro group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Friday, 01/10/20 7:30 PM

Peninsula Astronomical Society
Foothill College
Room 5015
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Apollo Program

50 years ago, humans first walked upon the moon. However, the scientific, technological, and social effects on broader society began well before and have continued long after that event. In this talk, Foothill College Astronomy professor Geoff Mathews will sample some of the highlights of the Apollo program’s legacy, with a few thoughts regarding future efforts.

Website: http://pastro.org/dnn/

Cost: Free ($3 parking)

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Fri. 01/10/2020 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

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Fri. 01/10/2020 and Sat. 01/11/2020

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri 01/10/2020 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 01/11/2020 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 01/11/20 7:30 PM

East Bay Astronomical Society
Chabot Space & Science Center, 10000 Skyline Blvd
2nd Floor, Spees Bldg, Galileo Room
Oakland, CA 94619

Fly me to the Moon: Fantasy Flights to the Moon

Over the centuries, storytellers have written tales of flights to the Moon. Mr. Garfinkle will discuss these fantasy flights in a PowerPoint-enhanced presentation. The presentation will include illustrations from the old books the stories were, in most cases, first published in. The images show the various methods the space travelers employed to make their journeys to our nearest celestial neighbor. These include crafts that were powered by such things as animals, bottles of dew, giant magnets, ships, whirlwinds, clouds, volcanic eruptions, hot air balloons, cannons, and undisclosed powers.

Speaker: Bob Garfinkle, Royal Astronomical Society

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 01/11/20
07:30 PM – 09:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

My top 10 stories of 2019 in meteor astronomy

An informal re-telling of ten stories I worked on and were published in 2019:
– Tunguska eye witness accounts, injuries and casualties
-Saricicek meteorite traced back to Vesta crater Antonia
– The Alpha Monocerotid outburst
– Phoenicids from the breakup of comet Blanpain
– Search for the meteoroids from asteroid Bennu
– June epsilon Ophiuchids from comet 300P/Catalina
– The 15-Bootids meteor shower and the bright comet of 539 AD
– A meteor shower from C/1907 G1 (Grigg-Mellish)
– The 1873 Diepenveen meteorite
– The Creston meteorite fall in California

Speaker: P. Jenniskens, SETI

Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/267473659/

Cost: Free

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Monday, 01/13/20 7:30 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Baby Planets and Their Nurseries

We know that planets are born in the protoplanetary disks that surround stars when they are young. How these disks evolve into planetary systems is a fundamental question in Astronomy. Observations have revealed remarkable structures in disks that may indicate the presence of newly born planets. This talk will review these key observations and compare them to current theoretical predictions of planet formation. To conclude, possibilities for future progress in the field will be discussed.

Speaker: Catherine Espaillat, Boston University

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/baby-planets-and-their-nurseries

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

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Tuesday, 01/14/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

First Results from the Parker Solar Probe
Speaker: Shea Hess Webber and Ruizhu Chen, Stanford

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/first-results-parker-solar-probe

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 01/15/20 7:30 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114

Going Deep, the NGC and IC Project

This presentation highlights how a group of amateur and professional astronomers (The NGC/IC Project) have re-examined the source material used to compile the original NGC in 1888 and have produced a corrected NGC that reflects the original visual discoveries.

The NGC and IC objects were discovered over 100 years ago, but 15% – 20% have identification problems, poor positions, misidentifications, duplicate entries, incorrect classifications, and confusion with single or multiple stars. The NGC/IC sleuths have recovered hundreds of mistaken identities, lost objects, and solved long-standing contradictions in professional and amateur databases.

The NGC/IC Project’s corrected database is now incorporated into several amateur software programs (SkySafari, StarryNight, TheSky, Voyager, Guide, SkyMap Pro, Cartes du Ciel, and more) as well as professional online databases such as as NASA-IPAC Extragalactic Database, SIMBAD and HyperLeda. In this talk he will discuss the history of the NGC and give several examples of their catalogue sleuthing.

Speaker: Steve Gottlieb, Amateur Astronomer

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/monthly_lectures/randall/

Cost: Free

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Friday, 01/17/20
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Direct Deflection of Particle Dark Matter
Speaker: Sebastian Ellis, SLAC

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/direct-deflection-particle-dark-matter-0

Cost: Free

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Friday, 01/17/20 7:30 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers
1893 N. Vasco Rd
Unitarian Universalist Church
Livermore, CA 94551

Speaker: Matthew P. Kroonblawd, Lawrence Livermore National Lab

Did comet impacts jump-start life on Earth?

Recent observations confirming the presence of the protein-forming amino acid glycine in comets lend support to cometary impact as a possible source for delivering simple amino acids to early Earth. Little is known regarding the survivability or reactivity of glycine during impacts, especially considering that condensed phase chemistry at extreme conditions and can lead to the formation of new products through unusual synthetic routes. Quantum-based molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations are a useful atomistic modeling tool to predict chemistry that is difficult and expensive to isolate through laboratory experiments. With QMD, we explore how glycine reacts under the extreme temperatures, pressures, and shear states reached in shock impacts and other geological processes on early Earth and other planets and moons. Conditions typical of cometary impacts are found to prompt the rapid transformation of glycine into more complicated aromatic molecules. Shearing forces under more moderate compressive loads are predicted to drive formation of polypeptides and large oligomers. Our studies provide a “bottom-up” methodology and prospectus for predicting possible prebiotic chemistry under extreme conditions and help determine feasible chemical pathways towards chemicals needed for the origins of life.

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

Cost: Free

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Friday, January 17, 2020
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr,
San Jose, CA 95124

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

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Fri. 01/172020 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

==================================

Fri. 01/17/2020 and Sat. 01/18/2020

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 01/17/2020 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 01/18/2020 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Sat. 01/18/2020

Sunset: 5:18 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Soc.
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park in San Carlos
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

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