BayAstro – Events of Week of 01/20/2020 and Beyond

The BayAstro group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Tuesday, 01/21/20 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

A Hybrid Deep Learning Approach to Cosmological Constraints From Galaxy Redshift Surveys

I will present a new technique for accurately determining sigma_8 and Omega_m from mock 3D galaxy surveys. The method is a hybrid technique; it merges deep machine learning with physics. The method is trained and tested on mock surveys that are built from the AbacusCosmos suite of N-body simulations, comprising 40 cosmological-volume simulations spanning a range of cosmological models. These simulations are populated with galaxies according to a flexible generalized halo occupation distribution (HODs) to capture a wide range of galaxy formation models. In addition to describing the advantages of this hybrid approach, I will also discuss best practices and lessons-learned for training a deep models more generally.

Speaker: Michelle Ntampaka, CfA

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 01/21/20
04:30 PM – 05:30 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 200
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Space Observatories of the Highest Energy Particles: POEMMA & EUSO-SPB

Speaker: Angela Olinto, Univ. of Chicago

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/space-observatories-highest-energy-particles-poemma-euso-spb

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 01/22/20 7:00 PM

Silicon Valley Astronomy Lecture Series
Foothill College
Smithwick Theater
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

What Does a Black Hole Look Like: How We Got our First Picture

Black holes are one of the most remarkable predictions of Einstein’s theory of gravity: so much material is compressed into such a small volume that nothing, not even light, can escape. Black holes have also captured the public imagination, and are commonly featured in popular culture, from Star Trek to Hollywood movies. In Spring 2019, the world-wide Event Horizon Telescope released the first real (non-Hollywood!) picture of gas around a black hole and the “shadow” it makes as the gas swirls into the black hole. Dr. Quataert will describe how these observations were made and what they have taught us about black holes.

Speaker: Dr. Eliot Quataert, UC Berkeley

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/free-public-talk-on-what-does-a-black-hole-look-like-tickets-86978349585?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free (free parking in Lot 1)

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Thursday, 01/23/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Physics and Astrophysics Building Room 102/103
452 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

The Magnetic Milky Way in Three Dimensions

Magnetic fields thread our Milky Way Galaxy, influencing interstellar physics from cosmic ray propagation to star formation. The magnetic interstellar medium is also a formidable foreground for experimental cosmology, particularly for the quest to find signatures of inflation in the polarized cosmic microwave background. Despite its importance across scientific realms, the structure of the Galactic magnetic field is not well understood. Observational tracers like polarized dust emission yield only sky-projected, distance-integrated measurements of the three-dimensional magnetic structure. I will discuss new ways to probe interstellar magnetism in three dimensions, by combining high-resolution observations of Galactic neutral hydrogen with recent insights into how gas morphology encodes properties of the ambient magnetic field. The next decade of cosmology will generate deep observations of foreground synchrotron and polarized dust emission. I will present a vision for harnessing these and other data to map the Galactic magnetic field, elucidate its origin and role in astrophysical processes, and separate the Galactic signal from the universe beyond.

Speaker: Susan Clark, IAS

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/magnetic-milky-way-three-dimensions

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 01/23/20
06:30 PM – 08:00 PM

SETI Institute
189 Bernardo Ave
Mountain View, CA 94043

‘Passage to Mars’

Nobody gets to the red planet in Passage to Mars. Rather, the subjects of Jean-Christophe Jeauffre’s grandiose documentary are on a grueling trek through the Arctic, driving an experimental rover to Devon Island, a research site for potential Mars missions of the future. But that doesn’t keep team leader Pascal Lee from feeling like he’s an integral part of humanity’s giant interplanetary leap, and this attractive film plays along, hiring Zachary Quinto to read Lee’s journals with even more drama than he’d bring to a captain’s log if Spock subbed for Kirk in the next Star Trek adventure.

Lee leads a six-man team (two of whom are filmmakers) which hopes to drive the Okarian – a modified Humvee with tank-like treads – across the Northwest Passage to Devon Island before the winter sea ice melts. At Devon, the Okarian will be put through its paces in a vast, uninhabited desert terrain the Mars Institute uses to prep for long-term planetary exploration.

Jeauffre cuts lots of NASA-sourced Mars imagery into this icy story, drawing parallels between Arctic dangers and the sandstorms and isolation offered on that planet. Throughout, Quinto reads from Lee’s journals, which alternate between musing on the possibility that Mars missions will find life (or proof of earlier life) and chronicling more pressing concerns: the truck tread that blows apart en route, for instance; the failing alternator; and the risky decision to split the team up in search of crucial supplies.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/movie-night-at-the-seti-institute-passage-to-mars-tickets-87190847171?

Cost: Free, RSVP required

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Thursday, 01/23/20 7:00 PM

USGS Evening Public Lecture Series
345 Middlefield Road
Bldg 3, 2nd Floor Rambo Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

The Rise of the USGS in Space Exploration: How the Astrogeology Science Center is integral to the past, present, and future investigation of the Solar

Speaker: Justin Hagerty

Website: https://www.usgs.gov/science-support/communications-and-publishing/public-lecture-series

Cost: Free

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Friday, 01/24/20
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

HydroX: Hydrogen-doped Liquid Xenon for Dark Matter Searches

Speaker: Alden Fan

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/hydrox-hydrogen-doped-liquid-xenon-dark-matter-searches

Cost: Free

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Friday, 01/24/20 12:00 PM

Earth and Marine Sciences Building
UC Santa Cruz
Room A340
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

Isotopic Constraints for the Formation of the Moon

Speaker: Lars Borg, Lawrence Livermore National Lab

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/winter-2020.html

Cost: Free

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Fri. 01/24/2020 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

==================================

Fri. 01/24/2020 and Sat. 01/25/2020

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri 01/24/2020 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 01/25/2020 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Sat. 01/25/2020

Sunset: 5:24 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Soc.
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park in San Carlos
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

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Sunday, 01/26/20
02:00 PM – 03:30 PM

San Francisco Public Library
100 Larkin St
San Francisco, CA 94102

Are We Alone in the Cosmos?

Does other intelligent life exist in the universe? Can SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) researchers detect radio, infrared, or optical signals from other civilizations? Current and future SETI projects, including the new $100-million Breakthrough Prize Foundation “Listen” project, may provide an answer. UC Berkeley astronomer Dan Werthimer will describe the rationale for past and future searches and will show how new technologies are revolutionizing SETI.

Website: https://wonderfest.org/are-we-alone-2/

Cost: Free

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Sunday, 01/26/20 2:00 PM

ExplOratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

Full-Spectrum Science: Radioactivity

What’s going on inside the nucleus of an atom? Why does it spit out radiation? Did you know that you are exposed to radioactivity every day? Learn the facts about this somewhat controversial topic.

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/full-spectrum-science-radioactivity-1-26-2020

Cost: Free with Admission

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Tuesday, 1/28/2020 7:15 PM

Mount Diablo Astronomical Society
Community Room
Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Avenue, Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Speaker: Dr. Gaspard Duchene, UCB

Topic: Directly imaging exoplanets

Dr. Gaspard Duchene, Associate Researcher and Lecturer at UC Berkeley, will discuss the methods used to obtained the first images of planets around other stars. Dr. Duchene also will review the development of techniques and instruments over the past few years that have been used to perform large-scale surveys of hundreds of nearby stars.

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Tuesday, 01/28/20 7:30 PM

SLAC Public Lecture Series
2575 Sand Hill Road
Bldg 53, Panofsky Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

A Sparkle in the Dark: The Outlandish Quest for Dark Matter

The nature and origin of dark matter are among the most compelling mysteries of contemporary science. There is strong evidence for dark matter from its role in shaping the galaxies and galaxy clusters that we observe in the universe. Still, for over three decades, physicists have been trying to detect the dark matter particles themselves with little success. This talk will describe the next stage in that search, the LZ detector. LZ is an instrument that is superlative in many ways. It consists of 10 tons of liquified xenon gas, maintained at almost atomic purity and stored in a refrigerated titanium cylinder a mile underground in a former gold mine in Lead, South Dakota. The talk will present some of the challenges in constructing and operating this large-scale underground experiment and the prospects LZ presents for finally discovering the dark matter particle.

Speaker: Maria Elena Monzani, SLAC

Website: https://www6.slac.stanford.edu/public-lectures

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 01/29/20
07:30 PM – 08:30 PM

Marin Science Seminar
320 Nova Albion Way
Terra Linda High School Rm 207
San Rafael, CA 94903

Geoengineering and Terraforming: the manipulation of climate on Earth and other planets

Speaker: Warren Wiscombe, NASA Goddard

Website: http://marinscienceseminar.com/calendar/

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 01/30/20
06:00 PM – 10:00 PM

ExplOratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

After Dark: Radioactivity
Activities include:

Full-Spectrum Science: Radioactivity
With Ron Hipschman
7:30 and 9:00 p.m. | Osher Gallery 1, Kanbar Forum

What’s going on inside the nucleus of an atom? Why does it spit out radiation? Did you know that you are exposed to radioactivity every day? Get the facts about this ubiquitous, somewhat controversial topic.

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/after-dark-january-30-2020

Cost: $19.95 General, $14.95 Daytime Members

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Thursday, 01/30/20
07:00 PM – 08:30 PM

Rinconada Library
1213 Newell Rd
Palo Alto, CA 94303

Insights on Saturn from the Cassini Space Probe

Dr. Matthew Tiscareno (SETI) studies how things move (dynamics) in the solar system. In many cases, he applies dynamical methods to Saturn’s rings and other planetary ring systems. He is a Participating Scientist and an Imaging Team Associate for the Cassini spacecraft, which has been orbiting Saturn since 2004. He is also involved with the James Webb Space Telescope, with efforts to send a spacecraft to Uranus and Neptune, and with other concepts for future space missions. He is the lead editor for the full-length technical book Planetary Ring Systems, which was published in 2017 by Cambridge University Press.

Website: https://paloalto.bibliocommons.com/events/5dd1cffd55b0c9450030773e

Cost: Free

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Friday, January 31, 2020
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr
San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 01/31/2020 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

==================================

Fri. 01/31/2020 and Sat. 02/01/2020

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 01/31/2020 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 02/01/2020 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 02/01/20
06:30 PM – 08:30 PM

College of San Mateo
1700 W Hillsdale Blvd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Jazz under the Stars

Jazz Under the Stars is a FREE monthly public stargazing event! Occurring on the Saturday after the 1st quarter moon (check our Events Page), join us on the 4th floor planetarium for a night of smooth jazz, bright stars, and a lot of fun! We play our jazz from CSM’s own KCSM 91.1. Founded in 1964, KCSM has grown to become one of the top 35 most listened to non-commercial stations in the US. With their help, the Astronomy department at CSM opens its observatory doors and balcony, for a night of science and fun! We operate for public viewing four dobsonian telescopes, prefect for viewing the planets Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. We also have a 140mm refractor, with which we view the craters on the moon. Finally, our schmidt-cassegrain is for our deep sky needs. It can peer deep into globular clusters, and nebulae! Our astronomers will also be available for questions and conversation, which you wouldn’t get anywhere else! Feel free to ask us your questions about the cosmos. Occasionally we even have the chance to image galaxies! Don’t miss out, join us at our next Jazz Under the Stars!!

Event is weather dependent. Check website for last minute cancelations.

Website: https://collegeofsanmateo.edu/astronomy/observatory.asp

Cost: Free

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