BayAstro – Events of Week of 01/27/2020 and Beyond

The BayAstro group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Monday, 01/27/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PMVarian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Stellar Property Statistics of Massive Halos: Common Kernel Shapes from Multiple Cosmological Hydrodynamics Simulations

In the last decade, the astrophysical processes driving galaxy formation in a cosmological context at kpc scales have been incorporated, largely independently, into multiple codes developed by different simulation teams. Each simulation solves the complex evolution of baryon components (principally cold/warm/hot gas phases, metals, stars, and supermassive black holes) coupled gravitationally to dark matter, and the realization of large cosmic volumes yields populations of thousands of massive halos that host groups and clusters of galaxies.
This talk will present a recent study of stellar property statistics of massive halo populations realized by three cosmological hydrodynamics simulations: BAHAMAS+MACSIS, TNG300 of the IllustrisTNG suite, and Magneticum Pathfinder. The simulations have spatial resolutions ranging 1.5 to 6 kpc, and each generates samples of 1000 or more halos with total mass >10^{13.5} M⊙ at z = 0. Applying a localized, linear regression (LLR) method, we extract halo mass-conditioned statistics (normalizations, slopes, and intrinsic covariance) for a three-element stellar property vector consisting of: i) Nsat, the number of satellite galaxies with stellar mass >10^{10} M⊙ within radius R200c of the halo; ii) M⋆,tot, the total stellar mass within that radius, and; iii) M⋆,BCG, the gravitationally-bound stellar mass of the central galaxy within a 100 kpc radius. While there is not perfect agreement in scaling relation parameters from the three simulation teams, we find common shapes of normalized property kernels for satellite galaxy count and total stellar mass, and all simulations show an anti-correlation between BCG stellar mass and satellite galaxy count at fixed halo mass, as anticipated from age-related arguments in which the BCGs in early-forming halos grow by accreting satellites to a larger extent than those in late-forming halos. We close with some potential implications and thoughts on how such population studies could be better facilitated through common data analysis and publication practices.

Speaker: August Evrard, Univ. of Michigan

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/stellar-property-statistics-massive-halos-common-kernel-shapes-multiple-cosmological

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 01/28/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Testing the CDM paradigm: constraining DM properties with CMB data

To date, all evidence for Cold Dark Matter (CDM) is still purely gravitational and thus the CDM paradigm remains to be thoroughly tested. In calculations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, CDM is usually modelled as pressureless perfect fluid. In the present work, we test the CDM paradigm by replacing the pressureless perfect fluid description by an imperfect fluid called Generalised Dark Matter (GDM). The standard CDM is nested in this new model which possesses more degrees of freedom and parameters.. The GDM is indeed able to model natural deviations from a pressurless perfect fluid, with non-zero equation of state, sound speed, and viscosity.

Using the Planck CMB data (and various other datasets), we present here the best constraints on the GDM model to date. This includes cases where all its parameters are allowed to vary independently in time in a non-parametric way, and cases where we model nonlinear effects using a GDM halo model, which allowed us to robustly include datasets from galaxy surveys to significantly tighten the constraints on GDM parameters.

(constraints: 1601.05097, 1802.09541, 1905.02739, model: 1605.00649)

Speaker: Michael Kopp, Nordita

Kavli Foundation

Speaker: Chris Martin, Kavli Foundation

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/kopp-testing-cdm-paradigm-constraining-dm-properties-cmb-data-martin-kavli-foundation

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 01/28/20
11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

Aegis Assisted Living
5555 Paradise Dr
Corte Madera, CA 94925

Wonderfest: The Most Famous Equation

Around the world, people recognize that E=mc^2 oozes cosmic insight. But what does this “most famous equation” really say? What are energy and mass? And what makes the speed of light, c, so important? [Hint: mass, moving at speed c, doesn’t turn into energy!] Using little more than common experience and middle-school math, Einstein’s “special relativity” gem can come to life – with surprising insights into the nature of reality.

Speaker: Tucker Hiatt, Wonderfest

Website: https://wonderfest.org/most-famous-equation-1/

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 01/28/20 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Stellar Property Statistics of Massive Halos: Common Kernel Shapes from Multiple Cosmological Hydrodynamics Simulations

In the last decade, the astrophysical processes driving galaxy formation in a cosmological context at kpc scales have been incorporated, largely independently, into multiple codes developed by different simulation teams. Each simulation solves the complex evolution of baryon components (principally cold/warm/hot gas phases, metals, stars, and supermassive black holes) coupled gravitationally to dark matter, and the realization of large cosmic volumes yields populations of thousands of massive halos that host groups and clusters of galaxies.

This talk will present a recent study of stellar property statistics of massive halo populations realized by three cosmological hydrodynamics simulations: BAHAMAS+MACSIS, TNG300 of the IllustrisTNG suite, and Magneticum Pathfinder. The simulations have spatial resolutions ranging 1.5 to 6 kpc, and each generates samples of 1000 or more halos with total mass >10^{13.5} M⊙ at z = 0. Applying a localized, linear regression (LLR) method, we extract halo mass-conditioned statistics (normalizations, slopes, and intrinsic covariance) for a three-element stellar property vector consisting of: i) Nsat, the number of satellite galaxies with stellar mass >10^{10} M⊙ within radius R200c of the halo; ii) M⋆,tot, the total stellar mass within that radius, and; iii) M⋆,BCG, the gravitationally-bound stellar mass of the central galaxy within a 100 kpc radius. While there is not perfect agreement in scaling relation parameters from the three simulation teams, we find common shapes of normalized property kernels for satellite galaxy count and total stellar mass, and all simulations show an anti-correlation between BCG stellar mass and satellite galaxy count at fixed halo mass, as anticipated from age-related arguments in which the BCGs in early-forming halos grow by accreting satellites to a larger extent than those in late-forming halos. We close with some potential implications and thoughts on how such population studies could be better facilitated through common data analysis and publication practices.

Speaker: Gus Evrard, Michigan

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 01/28/20 3:30 PM

Natural Science Annex
UC Santa Cruz
Room 101
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

Magnetism with an impact: Chicxulub crater

Speaker: Sonia Tikoo-Schantz, Stanford

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/whole-earth-seminars/winter-2020.html

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 1/28/2020 7:15 PM

Mount Diablo Astronomical Society
Community Room
Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Avenue, Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Speaker: Dr. Gaspard Duchene, UCB

Topic: Directly imaging exoplanets

Dr. Gaspard Duchene, Associate Researcher and Lecturer at UC Berkeley, will discuss the methods used to obtained the first images of planets around other stars. Dr. Duchene also will review the development of techniques and instruments over the past few years that have been used to perform large-scale surveys of hundreds of nearby stars.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astronomy-lecture-taking-snapshots-of-planets-around-other-stars-tickets-89194038771?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

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Tuesday, 01/28/20 7:30 PM

SLAC Public Lecture Series
2575 Sand Hill Road
Bldg 53, Panofsky Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

A Sparkle in the Dark: The Outlandish Quest for Dark Matter

The nature and origin of dark matter are among the most compelling mysteries of contemporary science. There is strong evidence for dark matter from its role in shaping the galaxies and galaxy clusters that we observe in the universe. Still, for over three decades, physicists have been trying to detect the dark matter particles themselves with little success. This talk will describe the next stage in that search, the LZ detector. LZ is an instrument that is superlative in many ways. It consists of 10 tons of liquified xenon gas, maintained at almost atomic purity and stored in a refrigerated titanium cylinder a mile underground in a former gold mine in Lead, South Dakota. The talk will present some of the challenges in constructing and operating this large-scale underground experiment and the prospects LZ presents for finally discovering the dark matter particle.

Speaker: Maria Elena Monzani, SLAC

Website: https://www6.slac.stanford.edu/public-lectures

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 01/28/20
07:00 PM – 09:30 PM

The Tabard Theater
29 North San Pedro Street
San Jose, CA 95110

Nerd Nite Silicon Valley: Space Junk & Internet Research

Grab a drink and see science fiction turned into science fact! Ever wonder about all the stuff that’s been launched into Earth’s orbit? Do you REALLY know how to “Google” something? You’ve got questions, our speakers have answers! Be there and be square!

27,000 Kilometers Per Hour in the Wrong Lane

Since 1957, what goes up does *not* necessarily come down. With more than half a million pieces of space junk whizzing around the planet at 30 times the speed of sound, how are we still able to go to space? As satellite mega-constellations are poised to connect the world, commercial space operations are booming, and NASA plans for the moon and beyond, let’s dig into the laws of man and nature that determine how long our luck can hold out and what are we doing to avoid the orbital debris catastrophe that could put an end to the space age.

Speaker: Preston Thomas, Synapse Synopsis

Asking the internet: using Google Artificial Intelligence to research your way through life

We do online research for just about everything in our lives: Thinking of going vegan but not sure how? Google it! Wanna know which detergent is safest for your little kid? Look it up! What kind of car should I buy? Ask the internet. But did you ever really learn HOW to do online research? Most people think they’re great at it, but in fact there’s a lot of room to improve. Dan will show you how to be a brilliant online researcher, and why Research really should be the 4th R of education (beyond just Reading, Writing, and aRithmetic).

Speaker: Daniel Russel, Google

Website: https://sv.nerdnite.com

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 01/29/20
07:30 PM – 08:30 PM

Marin Science Seminar
320 Nova Albion Way
Terra Linda High School Rm 207
San Rafael, CA 94903

Geoengineering and Terraforming: the manipulation of climate on Earth and other planets

Speaker: Warren Wiscombe, NASA Goddard

Website: http://marinscienceseminar.com/calendar/

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 01/30/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Physics and Astrophysics Building Room 102/103
452 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Cosmic Extremes: Time-Domain Astrophysics in a Multi-Messenger World

Time-domain astrophysics provides a unique opportunity to study the most extreme physical processes in the Universe, including the deaths of massive stars, the destruction and creation of compact objects like neutron stars and black holes, and the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes. I will discuss my recent and ongoing work to reveal the formation and structure of relativistic jets and outflows in the most extreme astrophysical transients, including gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and tidal disruption events (TDEs). I will further show that radio data provide the best constraints on the immediate environments of these transients, probing models of black hole growth and accretion (TDEs) and stellar evolution models (GRBs). Finally, I will discuss the bright future of time-domain astrophysics. With the pioneering detections of gravitational waves, astronomers and physicists have gained a new, complementary tool to study compact object mergers, with implications for fields as wide-ranging as general relativity, nuclear physics, cosmology, and shock physics. Collaboration with LIGO and its successor gravitational wave observatories will enable precision constraints on merger physics, while upcoming surveys like LSST will provide the first large samples of rare, relativistic events and move transient science into the statistical realm. Simultaneously, new radio interferometers like the ngVLA and the Square Kilometer Array are poised to transform radio astronomy, revealing the radio sky in unprecedented depth and leading to the discovery of relativistic transient populations in the radio band.

Speaker: Kate Alexander, Northwestern

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/cosmic-extremes-time-domain-astrophysics-multi-messenger-world

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 01/30/20
06:00 PM – 10:00 PM

ExplOratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

After Dark: Radioactivity
Activities include:

Full-Spectrum Science: Radioactivity
With Ron Hipschman
7:30 and 9:00 p.m. | Osher Gallery 1, Kanbar Forum

What’s going on inside the nucleus of an atom? Why does it spit out radiation? Did you know that you are exposed to radioactivity every day? Get the facts about this ubiquitous, somewhat controversial topic.

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/after-dark-january-30-2020

Cost: $19.95 General, $14.95 Daytime Members

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Thursday, 01/30/20
07:00 PM – 08:30 PM

Rinconada Library
1213 Newell Rd
Palo Alto, CA 94303

Insights on Saturn from the Cassini Space Probe

Dr. Matthew Tiscareno (SETI) studies how things move (dynamics) in the solar system. In many cases, he applies dynamical methods to Saturn’s rings and other planetary ring systems. He is a Participating Scientist and an Imaging Team Associate for the Cassini spacecraft, which has been orbiting Saturn since 2004. He is also involved with the James Webb Space Telescope, with efforts to send a spacecraft to Uranus and Neptune, and with other concepts for future space missions. He is the lead editor for the full-length technical book Planetary Ring Systems, which was published in 2017 by Cambridge University Press.

Website: https://paloalto.bibliocommons.com/events/5dd1cffd55b0c9450030773e

Cost: Free

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Friday, 01/31/20
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Lessons from O3: Optimizing the search for gravitational wave counterparts

Speaker: Kate Alexander, Northwestern

TBA

Speaker: Jae Hwan Kang, Kipac

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/alexander-lessons-o3-optimizing-search-gravitational-wave-counterparts-kang-tbd

Cost: Free

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Friday, 01/31/20 12:00 PM

Earth and Marine Sciences Building
UC Santa Cruz
Room A340
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

The origin of the Moon within a terrestrial synestia

The giant impact hypothesis has been the leading theory for the origin of the Moon for decades, but current models struggle to explain the Moon’s composition and isotopic similarity with Earth. I will present a new lunar origin model based on the discovery that high‐energy, high‐angular‐momentum giant impacts can create a previously unrecognized type of planetary structure, named a synestia. Using simulations of cooling synestias combined with dynamic, thermodynamic, and geochemical calculations, I will show that satellite formation from a synestia can produce the principal features of our Moon. Cooling of the synestia drives condensation, producing moonlets that orbit within the synestia, surrounded by tens of bars of bulk silicate Earth vapor. Moonlets equilibrate with bulk silicate Earth vapor at the temperature of silicate vaporization and the pressure of the structure, establishing the lunar isotopic and chemical composition. Eventually, the cooling synestia recedes within the lunar orbit, terminating the main stage of lunar accretion. Our model shifts the paradigm for lunar origin from specifying a certain impact scenario to achieving a Moon‐forming synestia.

Speaker: Simon Lock, Caltech

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/winter-2020.html

Cost: Free

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Friday, January 31, 2020
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr
San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

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Fri. 01/31/2020 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

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Fri. 01/31/2020 and Sat. 02/01/2020

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri 01/31/2020 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 02/01/2020 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 02/01/20
06:30 PM – 08:30 PM

College of San Mateo
1700 W Hillsdale Blvd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Jazz under the Stars

Jazz Under the Stars is a FREE monthly public stargazing event! Occurring on the Saturday after the 1st quarter moon (check our Events Page), join us on the 4th floor planetarium for a night of smooth jazz, bright stars, and a lot of fun! We play our jazz from CSM’s own KCSM 91.1. Founded in 1964, KCSM has grown to become one of the top 35 most listened to non-commercial stations in the US. With their help, the Astronomy department at CSM opens its observatory doors and balcony, for a night of science and fun! We operate for public viewing four dobsonian telescopes, prefect for viewing the planets Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. We also have a 140mm refractor, with which we view the craters on the moon. Finally, our schmidt-cassegrain is for our deep sky needs. It can peer deep into globular clusters, and nebulae! Our astronomers will also be available for questions and conversation, which you wouldn’t get anywhere else! Feel free to ask us your questions about the cosmos. Occasionally we even have the chance to image galaxies! Don’t miss out, join us at our next Jazz Under the Stars!!

Event is weather dependent. Check website for last minute cancelations.

Website: https://collegeofsanmateo.edu/astronomy/observatory.asp

Cost: Free

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Monday, 02/03/20 4:15 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Scanning the Sky for Sterile Neutrino Dark Matter

The particle nature of dark matter is a driving question of contemporary physics, with astrophysical experiments leading the search for dark matter annihilation or decay signatures. Sterile neutrinos, which could provide an elegant solution to the puzzle of the observed active neutrino masses and mixing, are among the most well-motivated light dark matter candidates, with astrophysical X-ray observations offering the best opportunity for discovery. In this talk, I will review the status of X-ray searches for sterile neutrinos, including the candidate sterile neutrino signal at ~3.5 keV. In particular, I will describe the novel use of the NuSTAR X-ray satellite observatory to provide the leading constraints in much of the mass range ~10-50 keV, improving upon previous limits at some masses by over an order of magnitude and reducing the available parameter space for sterile neutrinos in the simplest models by almost two-thirds.

Speaker: Kerstin Perez, MIT

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20200203/scanning-the-sky-for-sterile-neutrino-dark-matter
Cost: Free

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Monday, 02/03/20
08:00 PM – 09:30 PM

Verdi Club
2424 Mariposa St
San Francisco, CA 94110

Wonderfest: Ask a Science Envoy: Optimization, Ecology, & Supernovae

Wonderfest Science Envoys are early-career researchers with special communication skills and aspirations. Following short talks on provocative modern science topics, these three Science Envoys will answer questions with insight and enthusiasm:

• UC Berkeley industrial engineer and operations researcher Caleb Bugg on “Engineering in an Apocalyptic World”
• Stanford Earth systems scientist Sami Li Chen on “Rapunzel, Rapunzel, Give Me Some Ramps”
• UC Berkeley astrophysicist Abigail Polin on “Things that Go Boom in the Night: A Story of Type Ia Supernovae.”

Website: https://wonderfest.org/optimization-ramps-supernovae/

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 02/04/20 3:30 PM

Natural Science Annex
UC Santa Cruz
Room 101
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

The structure and dynamics of Europa’s ice shell

Jupiter’s moon Europa is a fascinating world and a prime candidate for life within our Solar System. I will focus on the outer ice shell of the satellite where the dissipated tidal energy sustains a subsurface ocean. If the ice shell allows for exchange processes, exogenic material deposited on the surface would be an important factor for habitability. If the exchange of material with the ocean is reciprocal, the shell can also serve as a window to the interior of the moon. I will discuss the recent progress in understanding the structure and dynamics of Europa’s ice shell and give an overview on how NASA’s upcoming Europa Clipper mission can contribute to the exploration of this unique icy satellite by radar sounding.

Speaker: Gregor Steinbrügge, UT Austin/Stanford

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/whole-earth-seminars/winter-2020.html

Cost: Free

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Friday, 02/07/20 12:00 PM

Earth and Marine Sciences Building
UC Santa Cruz
Room A340
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

The Anatomy of the Blue Dragon: Correlations between Lava Flow Morphology and Physical Properties

Speaker: Alexander Sehlke, NASA

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/winter-2020.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 02/07/20 8:00 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402
USA

Satellite Galaxies and Dwarfs in the Local Group

Our Local Group of galaxies is composed of our Milky Way; its twin galaxy, Andromeda (M31); and the dozens of small “satellite” galaxies orbiting around each of them. Satellite galaxies are thought to be the building blocks of more massive galaxies, therefore tracking the orbital histories of satellite galaxies in the galactic neighborhood is crucial to our understanding of how the Milky Way and Andromeda arrived at their current properties. Since galaxies are embedded in halos of dark matter — the invisible matter that makes up 85% of the matter in the Universe — satellite galaxies also act as tracers of this massive, mysterious matter. In this talk, I will explain how the individual orbital histories of these galaxies help us learn about the evolution of satellites themselves. Additionally, I will demonstrate how the collective motion of these systems of satellite galaxies can reveal important characteristics of their host galaxies, including the properties of their dark matter halos.

Speaker: Dr. Ekta Patel, UC Berkeley

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/meetings.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 02/07/2020 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

==================================

Fri. 02/07/2020 and Sat. 02/08/2020

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 02/07/2020 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 02/08/2020 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Monday, 02/10/20 7:30 PM

Dean Astronomy Lecture series
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

From Dust Motes to Icy Mountains: Asteroids and Comets

Our solar system teems with asteroids and comets, which range in size from tiny dust particles to gigantic mountains that are worlds in their own right. While most of these objects remain in stable orbits that whirl them around them Sun for billions of years, every now and again something changes: some objects can be perturbed into orbits that encounter Earth. In the last few decades, astronomers have begun systematic searches for potentially Earth-impacting asteroids and comets, and in the process have learned much about Earth’s nearest cosmic neighbors. As study of the distant universe has advanced, so has our understanding of the contents of our own solar system, and its potential to affect life on Earth.

Speaker: Amy Mainzer, University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/from-dust-motes-to-icy-mountains-asteroids-and-comets

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

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