BayAstro – Events of Week of 02/03/2020 and Beyond

The BayAstro group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
==================================

Monday, 02/03/20
10:00 AM – 11:00 PM

Stanford Linear Accelerator
Building 048
Redwoods C/D
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Testing inflation and constraining cosmology with cosmic microwave background measurements

Inflation — the leading model for the earliest moments of the time, in which the Universe undergoes a period of rapid, accelerating expansion — generically predicts a background of primordial gravitational waves, which generate a B-mode component in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The measurement of such a B-mode signature would lend significant support to the paradigm of inflation. However, observed B modes also contain a component from the gravitational lensing of primordial E modes, which can obscure the measurement of the primordial B modes. We reduce the uncertainties in the B-mode measurement contributed from this lensing component by a technique called ‘delensing.’ In this talk, I will give an update on the current delensing effort on the BICEP/Keck data, using data from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and the Planck satellite. This analysis will tighten the constraint on the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves, parameterized through the tensor-to-scalar ratio r that is related to the energy scale of inflation. For upcoming analyses, efficient delensing relies on high signal-to-noise measurements of the CMB lensing mass map. I will show the current state-of-the-art measurement of CMB lensing using SPTpol data, its inferred cosmological constraints, and its relevance for delensing. I will then discuss on-going efforts and novel methods in making lensing mass maps using new data/simulations from current and next-generation CMB experiments. After discussing the related challenges and opportunities, I will finish with an outlook on constraining r in this decade.

Speaker: Kimmy Wu, KIPC

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/testing-inflation-and-constraining-cosmology-cosmic-microwave-background-measurements

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 02/03/20
11:20 AM – 12:20 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Bright (active) Galaxies in Dark Matter halos

The bright galaxies comes in different colours and show different activities. Some are red, some blue and others have angry supermassive blackholes. These galaxies acts as the doorway to the cosmological universe we live in. Our understanding of inner working of universe and its mysterious dark components of matter and energy depends on the very large scale structure formed by these bright galaxies. The vibrant colours and behaviour shown in these galaxies hints towards rich physics involved in how they come about, live and die. I will discuss how we can learn some of the galaxy physics using measurements from galaxy redshift survey and at the same time how such understanding can play a crucial role in cosmological measurements. I will show examples from current available data and emphasis the importance for upcoming and future surveys.

Speaker: Dhadab Alam, Univ of Edinburgh)

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/bright-active-galaxies-dark-matter-halos

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 02/03/20
02:00 PM – 03:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

The Hubble Hunter’s Guide

There appears to be a significant discrepancy between Lambda CDM predictions of the Hubble constant and measurements of the Hubble constant. I will review the evidence that this discrepancy arises due to a faliure of LCDM, and discuss the challenges to resolving the discrepancy with various LCDM extensions.

Speaker: Lloyd Knox, UC Davis

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/hubble-hunters-guide

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 02/03/20  4:15 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Scanning the Sky for Sterile Neutrino Dark Matter

The particle nature of dark matter is a driving question of contemporary physics, with astrophysical experiments leading the search for dark matter annihilation or decay signatures. Sterile neutrinos, which could provide an elegant solution to the puzzle of the observed active neutrino masses and mixing, are among the most well-motivated light dark matter candidates, with astrophysical X-ray observations offering the best opportunity for discovery.  In this talk, I will  review the status of X-ray searches for sterile neutrinos, including the candidate sterile neutrino signal at ~3.5 keV.  In particular, I will describe the novel use of the NuSTAR X-ray satellite observatory to provide the leading constraints in much of the mass range ~10-50 keV, improving upon previous limits at some masses by over an order of magnitude and reducing the available parameter space for sterile neutrinos in the simplest models by almost two-thirds.

Speaker: Kerstin Perez, MIT

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20200203/scanning-the-sky-for-sterile-neutrino-dark-matter
Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 02/03/20
08:00 PM – 09:30 PM

Verdi Club
2424 Mariposa St
San Francisco, CA 94110

Wonderfest: Ask a Science Envoy: Optimization, Ecology, & Supernovae

Wonderfest Science Envoys are early-career researchers with special communication skills and aspirations. Following short talks on provocative modern science topics, these three Science Envoys will answer questions with insight and enthusiasm:

   • UC Berkeley industrial engineer and operations researcher Caleb Bugg on “Engineering in an Apocalyptic World”
   • Stanford Earth systems scientist Sami Li Chen on “Rapunzel, Rapunzel, Give Me Some Ramps”
   • UC Berkeley astrophysicist Abigail Polin on “Things that Go Boom in the Night: A Story of Type Ia Supernovae.”

Website: https://wonderfest.org/optimization-ramps-supernovae/

Cost:  Free

==================================

Tuesday, 02/04/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Cosmology using Galaxy Clusters in DESI

Speaker: Christopher Bradshaw, UC Santa Cruz

TBA

Speaker: Zhanpei Fang, Stanford

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/bradshaw-cosmology-using-galaxy-clusters-desi-fang-tbd

Cost:  Free

==================================

Tuesday, 02/04/20  3:30 PM

Natural Science Annex
UC Santa Cruz
Room 101
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

The structure and dynamics of Europa’s ice shell

Jupiter’s moon Europa is a fascinating world and a prime candidate for life within our Solar System. I will focus on the outer ice shell of the satellite where the dissipated tidal energy sustains a subsurface ocean. If the ice shell allows for exchange processes, exogenic material deposited on the surface would be an important factor for habitability. If the exchange of material with the ocean is reciprocal, the shell can also serve as a window to the interior of the moon. I will discuss the recent progress in understanding the structure and dynamics of Europa’s ice shell and give an overview on how NASA’s upcoming Europa Clipper mission can contribute to the exploration of this unique icy satellite by radar sounding.

Speaker: Gregor Steinbrügge, UT Austin/Stanford

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/whole-earth-seminars/winter-2020.html

Cost:  Free

==================================

Thursday, 02/06/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Physics and Astrophysics Building Room 102/103
452 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Toward Maps of Exoplanet Surfaces

Perhaps the simplest question that one can ask of a distant star or planet is, “What does it actually look like?” Even the best interferometers can only give us limited information about the surfaces of select giant and/or nearby stars, while the direct imaging of exoplanet surfaces is all but impossible. Fortunately, several techniques exist that allow us to indirectly infer what the surfaces of stars and exoplanets look like from precise photometric light curves and high resolution spectral timeseries. In this talk, I will review previous approaches to mapping the surfaces of stars as well as recent results in the nascent field of exocartography. I will discuss the mathematical theory behind the mapping problem, including its degeneracies and limitations, and present several novel approaches to producing surface maps of stars and exoplanets. Finally, I will show how these maps can be used to learn about the physics of stellar surfaces and the dynamics of gas giant atmospheres, paving the way to the characterization of terrestrial planets in the habitable zone of their stars with future instrumentation.

Speaker: Rodrigo Luger, CCA, Flatiron Institute

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/toward-maps-exoplanet-surfaces

Cost:  Free

==================================

Friday, 02/07/20
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Two KIPAC Tea Talks
TBA

Speaker: August Evrard, Univ. of Michigan

Lots of Fun With TRAPPIST-1

Speaker: Rodrigo Luger, CCA, Flatiron Institute

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/evrard-tbd-luger-lots-fun-trappist-1

Cost:  Free

==================================

Friday, 02/07/20  12:00 PM

Earth and Marine Sciences Building
UC Santa Cruz
Room A340
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

The Anatomy of the Blue Dragon: Correlations between Lava Flow Morphology and Physical Properties

Speaker: Alexander Sehlke, NASA

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/winter-2020.html

Cost:  Free

==================================

Friday, 02/07/20  8:00 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402
USA

Satellite Galaxies and Dwarfs in the Local Group

Our Local Group of galaxies is composed of our Milky Way; its twin galaxy, Andromeda (M31); and the dozens of small “satellite” galaxies orbiting around each of them. Satellite galaxies are thought to be the building blocks of more massive galaxies, therefore tracking the orbital histories of satellite galaxies in the galactic neighborhood is crucial to our understanding of how the Milky Way and Andromeda arrived at their current properties. Since galaxies are embedded in halos of dark matter — the invisible matter that makes up 85% of the matter in the Universe — satellite galaxies also act as tracers of this massive, mysterious matter. In this talk, I will explain how the individual orbital histories of these galaxies help us learn about the evolution of satellites themselves. Additionally, I will demonstrate how the collective motion of these systems of satellite galaxies can reveal important characteristics of their host galaxies, including the properties of their dark matter halos.

Speaker: Dr. Ekta Patel, UC Berkeley

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/meetings.html

Cost:  Free

==================================

Fri. 02/07/2020 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

==================================

Fri. 02/07/2020 and Sat. 02/08/2020

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 02/07/2020 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 02/08/2020 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 02/08/20  7:30 PM

East Bay Astronomical Society
Chabot Space & Science Center, 10000 Skyline Blvd
2nd Floor, Spees Bldg, Galileo Room
Oakland, CA 94619

Mysterious Visitors from Outside Our Solar System: Oumuamua and Comet Borisov

As of today, only two objects have been observed, which can be definitively identified as of interstellar origin & destination: I1/‘Oumuamua & 2I/Borisov. ‘Oumuamua was an enigmatic object, visible only for about 2 weeks. While the high eccentricity of its orbit certainly makes it interstellar, it cannot be pinned down as either an asteroid or a comet, and is even consistent in some ways with an interstellar solar sail. On the other hand, there is no doubt about Borisov being a comet. And Borisov will be around long enough to study in more detail. So we have now begun the era of serious observation of interstellar objects in the solar system. For my talk I will present what we know so far about these two interstellar voyagers. And if a third comes around before I get there, I will try to squeeze that one in too.

Speaker: Tim Thompson, Los Angeles Astronomical Society

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 02/10/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Simulating galaxy imaging surveys

Numerical simulations of weak gravitational lensing play an important role in statistical analyses of modern galaxy imaging data.

In this talk, I will introduce our recent developments to simulate galaxy imaging data. We developed a method to produce synthetic data by utilizing full-sky lensing simulations for a given galaxy catalog. We applied the method to the data sets of Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam Survey to study statistical uncertainties of two-point statistics of galaxy shapes. I will also discuss the possibility of using the synthetic data to train deep-learning networks for noise reduction in an observed lensing mass map.

Speaker: Masato Shirasaki, Jet Propulsion Lab

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/simulating-galaxy-imaging-surveys

Cost:  Free

==================================

Monday, 02/10/20  7:30 PM

Dean Astronomy Lecture series
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

From Dust Motes to Icy Mountains: Asteroids and Comets

Our solar system teems with asteroids and comets, which range in size from tiny dust particles to gigantic mountains that are worlds in their own right. While most of these objects remain in stable orbits that whirl them around them Sun for billions of years, every now and again something changes: some objects can be perturbed into orbits that encounter Earth. In the last few decades, astronomers have begun systematic searches for potentially Earth-impacting asteroids and comets, and in the process have learned much about Earth’s nearest cosmic neighbors. As study of the distant universe has advanced, so has our understanding of the contents of our own solar system, and its potential to affect life on Earth.

Speaker: Amy Mainzer, University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/from-dust-motes-to-icy-mountains-asteroids-and-comets

Cost:  $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

==================================

Thursday, 02/13/20  6:00 PM

Cafe Leila
1724 San Pablo Ave
Berkeley, CA 94702

Life beyond the Earth: Telescopes, exoplanets, and the search for intelligent life

Prior to 1995, there were no known planets around sun-like stars beyond the solar system. Once the first discovery was announced, many others quickly followed. We now calculate that, on average, nearly every star has a planet. What if the discovery of intelligent life beyond the Earth follows a similar path? Once we find the first instance, many others will quickly follow. The Breakthrough Listen Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is the most comprehensive, far-reaching investigation for alien intelligence ever undertaken.  Using the most sophisticated software available on the world’s most powerful telescopes Breakthrough Listen is attempting to make the first detection that could break open the floodgates to new discoveries.

Speaker: Howard Isaacson, UC Berkeley

Website: https://scienceatcal.berkeley.edu/science-cafe-feb-life-beyond-earth/

Cost:  Free

==================================

Friday, 02/14/20  7:30 PM

Peninsula Astronomical Society
Foothill College
Room 5015
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Touring Exotic Landforms Across the Solar System
Speaker: Brian Day, NASA Ames

Website: https://www.foothill.edu/astronomy/

Cost:  Free ($3 parking)

==================================

Friday, February 14, 2020
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr
San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 02/14/2020 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

==================================

Fri. 02/14/2020 and Sat. 02/15/2020

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 02/14/2020 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 02/15/2020 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Sat. 02/15/2020

Sunset: 5:48 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Soc.
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park in San Carlos
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

==================================

Sunday, 02/16/20
12:00 PM – 02:30 PM

First Unitarian Universalist Church and Center
1187 Franklin Street
San Francisco, CA 94109

What Were the Atoms in Your Body Doing 8 Billion Years Ago: The Story of Cosmic Evolution

Although few people ever think about it, the atoms that make up your body are “on loan” to you from the Earth’s “atom collection.” Thanks to modern astronomy, we now know the history of these atoms even before they were part of the Earth. In this talk, Dr. Andrew Fraknoi examines the history of the cosmos, and how it evolved from the heat of the Big Bang to conditions that make astronomy fans possible. We focus on the role of exploding stars, which create new elements and recycle them so that to be available to future generations of stars, planets, and life-forms.

Speaker: Andrew Fraknoi, Foothill College, Emeritus

Lecture is free and starts at 1:00 PM in the Thomas Starr King room.  Luncheon starts at 12:00 pm.

Website:

Cost:  $15 adult, $5 under 18

Written by

No Comments Yet.

Leave a Reply