BayAstro – Events of Week of 02/10/2020 and Beyond

The BayAstro group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
==================================

Monday, 02/10/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Simulating galaxy imaging surveys

Numerical simulations of weak gravitational lensing play an important role in statistical analyses of modern galaxy imaging data.

In this talk, I will introduce our recent developments to simulate galaxy imaging data. We developed a method to produce synthetic data by utilizing full-sky lensing simulations for a given galaxy catalog. We applied the method to the data sets of Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam Survey to study statistical uncertainties of two-point statistics of galaxy shapes. I will also discuss the possibility of using the synthetic data to train deep-learning networks for noise reduction in an observed lensing mass map.

Speaker: Masato Shirasaki, Jet Propulsion Lab

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/simulating-galaxy-imaging-surveys

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 02/10/20 12:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Welcome to the era of fast radio burst “cosmology”!

Fast radio bursts are frequent, bright millisecond bursts of radio emission that have fortunately turned out to not be from microwave ovens or alien light sails, but rather to be some new extragalactic phenomenon likely associated with neutron stars. Radio astronomers are beginning to localize these bursts to specific galaxies, opening up new extragalactic observables – the bursts’ dispersion, scattering, and Faraday rotation. Dispersion in particular yields the intervening column of electrons, providing a unique tool to probe the 95% of the baryons that sit outside of galaxies (the vast majority of which are invisible using other observational methods). I will present the first ever applications of diffuse baryon science with these bursts, using data from the ASKAP telescope. Even with fewer than ten localized bursts, we are able to make interesting inferences about circumgalactic gas and the “missing baryons”.
Speaker: Matt McQuinn, Washington State Univ.

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 02/10/20 7:30 PM

Dean Astronomy Lecture series
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

From Dust Motes to Icy Mountains: Asteroids and Comets

Our solar system teems with asteroids and comets, which range in size from tiny dust particles to gigantic mountains that are worlds in their own right. While most of these objects remain in stable orbits that whirl them around them Sun for billions of years, every now and again something changes: some objects can be perturbed into orbits that encounter Earth. In the last few decades, astronomers have begun systematic searches for potentially Earth-impacting asteroids and comets, and in the process have learned much about Earth’s nearest cosmic neighbors. As study of the distant universe has advanced, so has our understanding of the contents of our own solar system, and its potential to affect life on Earth.

Speaker: Amy Mainzer, University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/from-dust-motes-to-icy-mountains-asteroids-and-comets

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

==================================

Tuesday, 02/11/20 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Cosmology from the diffuse baryons between galaxies

The field of cosmology has to make do with a theory of structure that is incomplete in the “ultraviolet” — we lack a precise understanding of the cosmologically minute scales on which galaxies form and affect their surroundings. I will review methods to circumvent this limitation, with a particular focus on using the ultra-dilute gas that lies far from galaxies as probed by intergalactic hydrogen absorption. This absorption provides our strongest constraints on the warmness/fuzziness of the dark matter, and it has untapped potential for revealing when the first galaxies formed and ionized the Universe. The standard picture is that, other than the cosmological model, the only other property that matters for shaping this absorption is the gas temperature. Indeed, the temperature is the major impediment for using this absorption to constrain the warmness/fuzziness of the dark matter, and precisely measuring the temperature from this absorption would reveal when the first galaxies formed. I will discuss my group’s work to finalize the often elegant rules that shape the temperature of intergalactic gas, as well as these rules’ implications for existing measurements. I will conclude provocatively, by questioning the standard picture for intergalactic gas; I will present a preliminary measurement and a research program pursuing further tests of this picture.

Speaker: Matt McQuinn, Washington State Univ.

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 02/13/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Physics and Astrophysics Building Room 102/103
452 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Near-Field Cosmology with Stellar Abundances

The first stars and galaxies fundamentally transformed the universe. They formed in the smallest dark matter halos, produced large amounts of ionizing photons, and polluted the universe with the first heavy elements. Near-field cosmology probes this early era through detailed study of nearby relic galaxies that have survived from ancient times. Most of the remaining information is encoded in the elemental abundances of old stars, but decoding these stellar abundances requires connecting physics spanning 37 orders of magnitude in scale: from nuclear and stellar astrophysics to galaxy formation and hierarchical assembly. I will use elements synthesized in the rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) to illustrate how stellar abundances open a window to the first stars and galaxies. My work has shaped our current understanding of the origin of r-process elements, informed multi-messenger observations of neutron star mergers, produced unique constraints on first galaxy formation, and now enables reconstruction of the hierarchical assembly of our Milky Way’s stellar halo. I will conclude with a blueprint for how stellar abundances across the Local Group will make near-field cosmology an observational pillar for accessing the high-redshift universe.

Speaker: Alexander Ji, Carnegie Institute

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/near-field-cosmology-stellar-abundances

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 02/13/20 6:00 PM

Cafe Leila
1724 San Pablo Ave
Berkeley, CA 94702

Life beyond the Earth: Telescopes, exoplanets, and the search for intelligent life

Prior to 1995, there were no known planets around sun-like stars beyond the solar system. Once the first discovery was announced, many others quickly followed. We now calculate that, on average, nearly every star has a planet.. What if the discovery of intelligent life beyond the Earth follows a similar path? Once we find the first instance, many others will quickly follow. The Breakthrough Listen Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is the most comprehensive, far-reaching investigation for alien intelligence ever undertaken. Using the most sophisticated software available on the world’s most powerful telescopes Breakthrough Listen is attempting to make the first detection that could break open the floodgates to new discoveries.

Speaker: Howard Isaacson, UC Berkeley

Website: https://scienceatcal.berkeley.edu/science-cafe-feb-life-beyond-earth/

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 02/14/20
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Modeling the Radiogenic Background of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

Speaker: Micah Buuck, KIPAC

Nucleosysthesis in Neutron Star Mergers

Speaker: Alexander Ji, Carnegie Institute

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/buuck-modeling-radiogenic-background-majorana-demonstrator-ji-nucleosynthesis-neutron-star

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 02/14/20 7:30 PM

Peninsula Astronomical Society
Foothill College
Room 5015
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Touring Exotic Landforms Across the Solar System: Adventures in Planetary Geomorphology

Speaker: Brian Day, NASA Ames

Website: http://www.pastro.org/dnn/

Cost: Free ($3 parking)

==================================

Friday, February 14, 2020
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr
San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 02/14/2020 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

==================================

Fri. 02/14/2020 and Sat. 02/15/2020

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 02/14/2020 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 02/15/2020 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Sat. 02/15/2020

Sunset: 5:48 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Soc.
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park in San Carlos
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset.. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

==================================

Sunday, 02/16/20
12:00 PM – 02:30 PM

First Unitarian Universalist Church and Center
1187 Franklin Street
San Francisco, CA 94109

What Were the Atoms in Your Body Doing 8 Billion Years Ago: The Story of Cosmic Evolution

Although few people ever think about it, the atoms that make up your body are “on loan” to you from the Earth’s “atom collection.” Thanks to modern astronomy, we now know the history of these atoms even before they were part of the Earth. In this talk, Dr. Andrew Fraknoi examines the history of the cosmos, and how it evolved from the heat of the Big Bang to conditions that make astronomy fans possible. We focus on the role of exploding stars, which create new elements and recycle them so that to be available to future generations of stars, planets, and life-forms.

Speaker: Andrew Fraknoi, Foothill College, Emeritus

Lecture is free and starts at 1:00 PM in the Thomas Starr King room. Luncheon starts at 12:00 pm.

Website:

Cost: $15 adult, $5 under 18

===================================

Tuesday, 02/18/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

TBD

Speaker: Simon Birrer, KIPAC

Searching for axion strings with CMB and lensing

Speaker: Junwu Huang, Permieter Institute

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/birrer-tbd-huang-searching-axion-strings-cmb-and-lensing

Cost: Free

===================================

Wednesday, 02/19/20
07:00 PM – 08:30 PM

Original Hick’ry Pit
980 E Campbell Ave
Campbell, CA 95008

Wonderfest: The Most Famous Equation

Around the world, people recognize that E=mc^2 oozes cosmic insight. But what does this “most famous equation” really say? What are energy and mass? And what makes the speed of light, c, so important? [Hint: mass, moving at speed c, doesn’t turn into energy!] Using little more than common experience and middle-school math, Einstein’s “special relativity” gem can come to life – with surprising insights into the nature of reality.

Speaker: Tucker Hiatt, Wonderfest

Website: https://wonderfest.org/most-famous-equation-2/

Cost: Free

===================================

Wednesday, 02/19/20 7:30 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114

New Horizons, NASA’s Pluto-Kuiper Belt Mission and the Arrokoth Encounter

This presentation explores the historic voyage of the New Horizons spacecraft. After 10 years and more than 3 billion miles, New Horizons has served as an ambassador to the planetary frontier and has shed light on new kinds of worlds and the outskirts of the solar system.

In this talk Dr. Moore will discuss New Horizon’s flight above the surface of Pluto and its encounter with the cold classical Kuiper Belt object (KBO) Arrokoth and will explain how this encounter has provided a look back into the beginning of our solar system, to a place where we can observe the most primordial building blocks of our world and the worlds around us.

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/monthly_lectures/randall/

Cost: Free

===================================

Thursday, 02/20/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Physics and Astrophysics Building Room 102/103
452 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

The Extremes of Accretion: Ultraluminous X-ray Sources and Super-Eddington Pulsars

Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are off-nuclear X-ray sources with luminosities that exceed the Eddington limit for stellar renmant black holes. This implies either the presence of larger, ‘intermediate mass’ black holes, or systems that have managed to violate their Eddington limits. Prior to NuSTAR, black hole accretors were widely assumed, evenin the latter scenario. However, in 2014 NuSTAR made the remarkable discovery that one of these systems, M82 X-2, is in fact powered by an accreting, pulsating neutron star (i.e., a pulsar), firmly demonstrating that this is a source radiating at ~100 times Eddington. Much about these systems remains shrouded in mystery: it is not clear how significantly neutron star accretors contribute to the demographics of the overall ULX population, and it is also not understood how these sources are able to radiate at such extreme levels. As of today, roughly half a dozen neutron star ULXs are known, including systems radiating up to 500 times the Eddington limit. I will discuss the current state of this rapidly evolving field.

Speaker: Dominic Walton, Cambridge, UK

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/extremes-accretion-ultraluminous-x-ray-sources-and-super-eddington-pulsars

Cost: Free

===================================

Friday, 02/21/20 12:00 PM

Earth and Marine Sciences Building
UC Santa Cruz
Room A340
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

Understanding Planetary Interiors from the Atomic Interactions of Materials

Speaker: Felipe Gonzalez-Cataldo, UC Berkeley

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/winter-2020.html

Cost: Free

===================================

Friday, 02/21/20 7:30 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers
1893 N. Vasco Rd
Unitarian Universalist Church
Livermore, CA 94551

Securing Earth from Space Threats & Climate-Change Effects

As an author and speaker, Dr. Larry Lapin presents the case for upgrading the security of our Planet from space-threats. His simple 40-minute talk is sometimes frightening, but nevertheless inspiring.

Sadly, we have no true defense against big meteors. NASA gives very limited attention to extra-terrestrial hazards, with physical effort limited to sky-watching. There is no ready infrastructure for stopping another “dinosaur-killer” from space. This talk tells how to remedy the missing security. That would involve a new space program devoted to defending our Planet. Funding for that might come from premiums collected for a new category of insurance, covering damages from space objects. We might think of that as health insurance for patient Earth.

Dr. Lapin’s talk lays out the problem while noting that we have the capability to secure our Planet from another “dinosaur-killing” meteor. He notes that our primary handicap is the public’s lack of awareness. Unlike so many disastrous natural events that cannot be prevented – such as earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes, and volcanoes – extra-terrestrial threats can actually be mitigated. We already have key technology for that.

Dr. Lapin outlines steps for achieving a secure Earth. The key element is an independent Planet Security Guard, equal to and separate from NASA.

Dr. Lapin believes that saving our Planet from extra-terrestrial threats will inspire us and lead the way to successfully deal with a twin problem: the effects of Climate Change.

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

Cost: Free

===================================

Fri. 02/21/2020 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

==================================

Fri. 02/21/2020 and Sat. 02/22/2020

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 02/21/2020 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 02/22/2020 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Sat. 02/22/2020

Sunset: 5:56 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Soc.
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park in San Carlos
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset.. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

==================================

Monday, 02/24/20
06:00 PM – 07:30 PM

Hopmonk Tavern
224 Vintage Way
Novato, CA 94945

Wonderfest: Black Hole Portrait

Black holes are among the most remarkable predictions of Einstein’s theory of gravity. So much material is compressed into such a small volume that nothing, not even light, can escape. In Spring 2019, the multinational Event Horizon Telescope released the first real picture of gas around a massive black hole and the “shadow” cast as that gas swirls in. UC Berkeley astrophysicist Dr. Eliot Quataert will describes how this – and other – pioneering observations were made and what they have taught us about black holes.

Speaker: Eliot Quataert, UC Berkeley

Website: https://wonderfest.org/black-hole-portrait/

Cost: Free

==================================

Sat. 02/15/2020 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Sat. 02/15/2020

Sunset: 5:48 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Soc.
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park in San Carlos
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

==================================

Sunday, 02/16/20
12:00 PM – 02:30 PM

First Unitarian Universalist Church and Center
1187 Franklin Street
San Francisco, CA 94109

What Were the Atoms in Your Body Doing 8 Billion Years Ago: The Story of Cosmic Evolution

Although few people ever think about it, the atoms that make up your body are “on loan” to you from the Earth’s “atom collection.” Thanks to modern astronomy, we now know the history of these atoms even before they were part of the Earth. In this talk, Dr. Andrew Fraknoi examines the history of the cosmos, and how it evolved from the heat of the Big Bang to conditions that make astronomy fans possible. We focus on the role of exploding stars, which create new elements and recycle them so that to be available to future generations of stars, planets, and life-forms.

Speaker: Andrew Fraknoi, Foothill College, Emeritus

Lecture is free and starts at 1:00 PM in the Thomas Starr King room.  Luncheon starts at 12:00 pm.

Website:

Cost:  $15 adult, $5 under 18

Written by

No Comments Yet.

Leave a Reply