BayAstro – Events of Week of 02/17/2020 and Beyond

The BayAstro group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Tuesday, 02/18/20
10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator Center
2575 Sand Hill Rd
Building 053, Trinity A
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Go Big, Go Left: Pushing the Limits of Liquid Xenon Detectors for Dark Matter Detection

While there is firm astrophysical evidence for dark matter, fundamental properties of the substance, such as its constituent size and mass, remain key open questions in modern physics. Observation of dark matter interactions with Standard Model particles would enable the first constraints on those properties, but, to date, no such interactions have been observed. The xenon Time Projection Chamber (TPC) technology leads searches worldwide for particle dark matter with masses around the proton mass and above. The LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) experiment is a next-generation dark matter search featuring a 10 tonne xenon TPC that will begin taking data this year. Over its 5 years of operation, LZ expects to improve upon the current dark matter sensitivity by a factor 30 beyond the current best results. In this talk, I will illustrate the powerful features of LZ that enable us to achieve such sensitivity, as well as present HydroX, a novel and promising upgrade path for LZ using hydrogen-doped xenon to probe dark matter particles with masses below the proton mass. Building on the success of LZ and xenon TPCs, HydroX has the potential to lead the field of low mass particle dark matter searches.

Speaker: Alden Fan, KIPAC

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/go-big-go-left-pushing-limits-liquid-xenon-detectors-dark-matter-detection

Cost:  Free

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Tuesday, 02/18/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Hubble constant tension: update from the strong lensing time-delay cosmography front

Speaker: Simon Birrer, KIPAC

Searching for axion strings with CMB and lensing

Speaker: Junwu Huang, Permieter Institute

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/birrer-hubble-constant-tension-update-strong-lensing-time-delay-cosmography-front-huang

Cost:  Free

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Tuesday, 02/18/20  1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Chasing Ancient Demons: The Quest to detect 21cm fluctuations from X-ray sources before reionization

Two important chapters in our Universe’s history remain, for the most part, unexplored by direct observations. During the “dark ages”, cooling gas clouds left over from the big bang collapsed into dark-matter halos to form the first bound objects and where conditions were right, the first stars ignited, heralding in the “Cosmic Dawn”. These first generations of galaxies heated, ionized, and enriched the intergalactic medium, forever changing the nature of stars and galaxies that could form in the future. Unfortunately, the majority of sources that drove this transformation are too faint to detect directly with optical and infrared facilities any time soon. A promising avenue to illuminating the cosmic dawn is to observe the impact of early sources on 21cm emission from the abundant HI that existed before reionization. Today, a number of radio facilities are being commissioned to detect the redshifted HI signal.
   I will present an overview of 21cm experiments along with the systematics challenges that they face and the strategies being adopted to overcome these challenges including the adoption of spectrally smooth RF signal chains and novel calibration techniques. I will also report progress by the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) in realizing these strategies.
   I will finish with a discussion of work exploring whether the recently claimed detection of a 78MHz cosmic dawn absorption feature by EDGEs might be explained by rapidly accreting radio loud black holes in the early Universe and the potential of power spectrum measurements by HERA to check whether the absorption feature is cosmological.

Speaker:  Aaron Ewall-Wice, UC Bekeley

Liang Dai, originally scheduled to speak today, has been rescheduled to Mar 3.

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost:  Free

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Tuesday, 02/18/20  3:30 PM

Natural Science Annex
UC Santa Cruz
Room 101
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

Integrating Materials Science Techniques into the Study of Planetary Hazes

Photochemical produced hazes are prevalent in the atmospheres of planetary bodies in the solar system and could also be ubiquitous in exoplanetary atmospheres. Haze has been shown to affect the thermal structure and dynamics of planetary and exoplanetary atmospheres. It could also be a source of the surface material on planetary bodies and thus get involved in various surface processes. However, many physical and chemical processes involving the haze are unknown due to the lack of knowledge of the haze as a material. Because of its chemical complexity, many of the intrinsic properties of the haze are highly material dependent and currently have large uncertainties in models. At UCSC, I am using laboratory facilities across the campus to characterize cohesive and thermal properties of planetary and exoplanetary hazes. With the measured properties of the haze, I am exploring cloud-haze interactions in planetary and exoplanetary atmospheres, aeolian transport in the outer solar system with organics being the main transporting material, and haze evolution in deep planetary and exoplanetary atmospheres.

Speaker: Xinting Yu, UC Santa Cruz

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/whole-earth-seminars/winter-2020.html

Cost:  Free

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Wednesday, 02/19/20
07:00 PM – 08:30 PM

Original Hick’ry Pit
980 E Campbell Ave
Campbell, CA 95008

Wonderfest: The Most Famous Equation

Around the world, people recognize that E=mc^2 oozes cosmic insight. But what does this “most famous equation” really say? What are energy and mass? And what makes the speed of light, c, so important? [Hint: mass, moving at speed c, doesn’t turn into energy!] Using little more than common experience and middle-school math, Einstein’s “special relativity” gem can come to life – with surprising insights into the nature of reality.

Speaker: Tucker Hiatt, Wonderfest

Website: https://wonderfest.org/most-famous-equation-2/

Cost:  Free

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Wednesday, 02/19/20  7:30 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114

New Horizons, NASA’s Pluto-Kuiper Belt Mission and the Arrokoth Encounter

This presentation explores the historic voyage of the New Horizons spacecraft. After 10 years and more than 3 billion miles, New Horizons has served as an ambassador to the planetary frontier and has shed light on new kinds of worlds and the outskirts of the solar system.

In this talk Dr. Moore will discuss New Horizon’s flight above the surface of Pluto and its encounter with the cold classical Kuiper Belt object (KBO) Arrokoth and will explain how this encounter has provided a look back into the beginning of our solar system, to a place where we can observe the most primordial building blocks of our world and the worlds around us.

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/monthly_lectures/randall/

Cost:  Free

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Thursday, 02/20/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Physics and Astrophysics Building Room 102/103
452 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

The Extremes of Accretion: Ultraluminous X-ray Sources and Super-Eddington Pulsars

Ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are off-nuclear X-ray sources with luminosities that exceed the Eddington limit for stellar renmant black holes. This implies either the presence of larger, ‘intermediate mass’ black holes, or systems that have managed to violate their Eddington limits. Prior to NuSTAR, black hole accretors were widely assumed, evenin the latter scenario. However, in 2014 NuSTAR made the remarkable discovery that one of these systems, M82 X-2, is in fact powered by an accreting, pulsating neutron star (i.e., a pulsar), firmly demonstrating that this is a source radiating at ~100 times Eddington. Much about these systems remains shrouded in mystery: it is not clear how significantly neutron star accretors contribute to the demographics of the overall ULX population, and it is also not understood how these sources are able to radiate at such extreme levels. As of today, roughly half a dozen neutron star ULXs are known, including systems radiating up to 500 times the Eddington limit. I will discuss the current state of this rapidly evolving field.

Speaker: Dominic Walton, Cambridge, UK

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/extremes-accretion-ultraluminous-x-ray-sources-and-super-eddington-pulsars

Cost:  Free

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Friday, 02/21/20
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

CMB lensing for the next generation of experiments

Speaker: Dominic Beck, KIPAC

TBD

Speaker: Dominic Walton, Cambridge, UK

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/beck-cmb-lensing-next-generation-experiments-walton-tbd

Cost:  Free

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Friday, 02/21/20  12:00 PM

Earth and Marine Sciences Building
UC Santa Cruz
Room A340
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

Understanding Planetary Interiors from the Atomic Interactions of Materials

Speaker: Felipe Gonzalez-Cataldo, UC Berkeley

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/winter-2020.html

Cost:  Free

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Friday, 02/21/20  7:30 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers
1893 N. Vasco Rd
Unitarian Universalist Church
Livermore, CA 94551

Securing Earth from Space Threats & Climate-Change Effects

As an author and speaker, Dr. Larry Lapin presents the case for upgrading the security of our Planet from space-threats. His simple 40-minute talk is sometimes frightening, but nevertheless inspiring.

Sadly, we have no true defense against big meteors. NASA gives very limited attention to extra-terrestrial hazards, with physical effort limited to sky-watching. There is no ready infrastructure for stopping another “dinosaur-killer” from space. This talk tells how to remedy the missing security. That would involve a new space program devoted to defending our Planet. Funding for that might come from premiums collected for a new category of insurance, covering damages from space objects. We might think of that as health insurance for patient Earth.

Dr. Lapin’s talk lays out the problem while noting that we have the capability to secure our Planet from another “dinosaur-killing” meteor. He notes that our primary handicap is the public’s lack of awareness. Unlike so many disastrous natural events that cannot be prevented – such as earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes, and volcanoes – extra-terrestrial threats can actually be mitigated. We already have key technology for that.

Dr. Lapin outlines steps for achieving a secure Earth. The key element is an independent Planet Security Guard, equal to and separate from NASA.

Dr. Lapin believes that saving our Planet from extra-terrestrial threats will inspire us and lead the way to successfully deal with a twin problem: the effects of Climate Change.

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

Cost:  Free

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Fri. 02/21/2020 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

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Fri. 02/21/2020 and Sat. 02/22/2020

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri 02/21/2020 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 02/22/2020 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Sat. 02/22/2020

Sunset: 5:56 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Soc.
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park in San Carlos
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

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Monday, 02/24/20
06:00 PM – 07:30 PM

Hopmonk Tavern
224 Vintage Way
Novato, CA 94945

Wonderfest: Black Hole Portrait

Black holes are among the most remarkable predictions of Einstein’s theory of gravity. So much material is compressed into such a small volume that nothing, not even light, can escape. In Spring 2019, the multinational Event Horizon Telescope released the first real picture of gas around a massive black hole and the “shadow” cast as that gas swirls in. UC Berkeley astrophysicist Dr. Eliot Quataert will describes how this – and other – pioneering observations were made and what they have taught us about black holes.

Speaker: Eliot Quataert, UC Berkeley

Website: https://wonderfest.org/black-hole-portrait/

Cost:  Free

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Tuesday, 02/25/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Two KIPAC Tea Talks
TBD

Speaker: Albert Chuang, KIPAC

Using field solvers to simulate astrophysical plasmas

Speaker: Andrew Eberhardt, KIPAC

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/chuang-tbd-eberhardt-using-field-solvers-simulate-astrophysical-plasmas

Cost:  Free

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Tuesday, 02/25/20  1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

UC Berkeley Cosmology Talk

Speaker:  Boryana Hadzhiyska, Harvard

“Limitations to the ‘basic’ HOD model and beyond”

We make use of the IllustrisTNG cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations to test fundamental assumptions of the mass-based Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) approach to modelling the galaxy-halo connection. By comparing the clustering of galaxies measured in the 300 Mpc TNG box (TNG300) with that predicted by the standard (“basic”) HOD model, we find that, on average, the “basic” HOD model underpredicts the real-space correlation function in the TNG300 box by ~15\% on scales of 1 Mpc/h < r < 20 Mpc/h, which is well beyond the target precision demanded of next-generation galaxy redshift surveys. We perform several tests to establish the robustness of our findings to systematic effects, including the effect of finite box size and the choice of halo finder. In our exploration of “secondary” parameters with which to augment the “basic” HOD, we find that the local environment of the halo, the velocity dispersion anisotropy and the product of the half-mass radius and the velocity dispersion, sigma^2 R_halfmass, are the three most effective measures of assembly bias that help reconcile the “basic” HOD-predicted clustering with that in TNG300. In addition, we test other halo properties such as halo spin, formation epoch and halo concentration. We also find that at fixed halo mass, galaxies in one type of environment cluster differently from galaxies in another. We demonstrate that a more complete model of the galaxy-halo connection can be constructed if both the mass and information regarding the local environment in which a halo is embedded are combined.

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost:  Free

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Tuesday, 02/25/20
06:00 PM – 08:00 PM

UC Santa Cruz Silicon Valley Campus
3175 Bowers Ave
Santa Clara, CA 95054

Astrobiologist Natalie Batalha

Natalie Batalha made Time magazine’s list of the 100 most influential people on Earth. She has discovered approximately 4,000 new planets – some of which may turn out to be capable of supporting life. She was recently elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences.

Website:  https://calendar.ucsc.edu/event/kraw_lecture_with_natalie_batalha_astrobiologist#.XkpCIy2ZNsM

Cost:  Free

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Tuesday, 02/25/20
07:15 PM – 09:00 PM

Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Ave
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

How to build a personal planetarium

Please join the Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society for our general meeting featuring award-winning educator and MDAS member Jeff Adkins, who will conduct a workshop on how to build a simple pinhole-based planetarium projector. Adkins, who teaches astronomy and physics at Deer Valley High School in Antioch, and at Los Medanos College in Pittsburg, will provide plans, templates and guidance for creating the projectors.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astronomy-lecture-how-to-build-a-personal-planetarium-tickets-93871120047?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost:  Free

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Wednesday, 02/26/20
07:00 PM – 08:00 PM

Villa Ragusa
35 S. Second Street
Campbell, CA 95008

Mind, Matter, and the Search for Meaning

World-renowned physicist Brian Greene offers a captivating exploration of the cosmos and our ongoing quest to understand it.

Greene takes us on a journey across time – from our most refined understanding of the universe’s beginning to the closest science can take us to the very end. He also explains the distinct but interwoven layers of reality – from quantum mechanics to consciousness to black holes.

Greene is known for his groundbreaking discoveries in superstring theory. He provides a clearer sense of how we came to be, where we are now and where we are ultimately headed.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/brian-greene-mind-matter-and-the-search-for-meaning-tickets-85537760745?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost:  $9 – $60

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Thursday, 02/27/20
06:30 PM – 09:00 PM

Michaels at Shoreline
2960 N Shoreline Blvd
Mountain View, CA 94043

Dinner meeting and panel discussion with ISS US National Laboratorium

The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the International Space Station (ISS) U.S. National Laboratory invite you to a unique event on February 27, 2020 to discover how YOUcan help improve life on Earth through research onboard the ISS.

In an engaging panel discussion, learn how the ISS National Lab is fostering groundbreaking science and providing opportunities for commercial companies, startups, and academic institutions to conduct innovative space-based research in partnership with NASA and commercial service providers. Find out how to launch your experiment to the ISS!

This event is open to the public and will feature the following panellists:

   • Miki Sode, ISS National Laboratory (Moderator)
   • Ronald Goedendorp, Nanoracks
   • Daniel Faber, Orbit Fab
   • Additional speaker to be announced

Website: https://aiaa-sf.org/event/dinner-meeting-iss-national-lab/

Cost:  $19 – $39

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Fri. 02/28/2020 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

==================================

Fri. 02/28/2020 and Sat. 02/29/2020

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 02/28/2020 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 02/29/2020 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

===================================

Saturday, 02/29/20  4:00 PM

San Bruno Public Library
701 Angus Ave
San Bruno, CA 94066

Exoplanets and How To Find Them

We’re currently in the midst of a golden age of astronomy. The confirmation of planets around other stars has given way to finding countless strange and fascinating worlds and stellar systems very unlike our own. What are some of these planets and how were they discovered? What techniques do astronomers use to find them? How do we know what they may be like and how may we be fooling ourselves? What is habitable anyway? What new discoveries are we looking forward to?

Speaker: Nic Scott, NASA Ames

Website: https://www.sanbruno.ca.gov/gov/city_departments/community_services/library/calendar.htm

Cost:  Free

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Saturday, 02/29/20
08:30 PM – 10:30 PM

Bldg. 36, Observatory
College of San Mateo
1700 W Hillsdale Blvd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Jazz under the Stars

Jazz Under the Stars is a FREE monthly public stargazing event! Occurring on the Saturday after the 1st quarter moon (check our Events Page), join us on the 4th floor planetarium for a night of smooth jazz, bright stars, and a lot of fun! We play our jazz from CSM’s own KCSM 91.1. Founded in 1964, KCSM has grown to become one of the top 35 most listened to non-commercial stations in the US. With their help, the Astronomy department at CSM opens its observatory doors and balcony, for a night of science and fun! We operate for public viewing four dobsonian telescopes, prefect for viewing the planets Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. We also have a 140mm refractor, with which we view the craters on the moon. Finally, our schmidt-cassegrain is for our deep sky needs. It can peer deep into globular clusters, and nebulae! Our astronomers will also be available for questions and conversation, which you wouldn’t get anywhere else! Feel free to ask us your questions about the cosmos. Occasionally we even have the chance to image galaxies! Don’t miss out, join us at our next Jazz Under the Stars!!

Event is weather dependent.  Check website for last minute cancelations.

Website: https://collegeofsanmateo.edu/astronomy/observatory.asp

Cost:  Free

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