BayAstro – Events of Week of 03/02/2020 and Beyond

The BayAstro group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Monday, 03/02/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PMVarian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Gravitational wave astrophysics and cosmology with large galaxy surveys

In the occasion of the exciting discovery of the electromagnetic counterpart of the GW170817 gravitational wave event, the Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration produced a series of studies covering different aspects of the event. In particular, these studies showed that observations of the GW170817 host galaxy can provide information about the formation of the binary neutron star that merged, producing the gravitational wave signal. The synergy between gravitational wave data and large galaxy survey such as DES can be further extended to binary black hole events. In fact, the first measurement of the Hubble constant using a binary-black-hole gravitational-wave detection has been possible using the LIGO/Virgo GW170814 event and the DES galaxy catalog. In order to use GW170814 as a standard siren in the absence of a host galaxy redshift, we applied a statistical method that takes into account all the potential host galaxies observed with DES. Anticipating a multifold increase on the LIGO/Virgo event detection rate in the coming years, this method will allow precision cosmology studies using recent and upcoming large galaxy surveys, such as DESI, in the very near future.

Speaker: Antonella Palmese, Fermilab

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/gravitational-wave-astrophysics-and-cosmology-large-galaxy-surveys

Cost: Free

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Monday, 03/02/20
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
2575 Sand Hill Rd, Building 51
Kavli Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

What’s at least 1015X the age of the universe?: The search for neutrino-less double beta decay

Neutrinos are among the most mysterious and elusive particles known to particle physicists. The neutrino was first theorized in 1930 to be a neutral and massless particle needed to preserve conservation of energy in the radioactive process of beta decay. Since its discovery in 1956, physicists have actively sought to understand more about the neutrino’s physical properties and behavior. Studying beta decay led the way to discovery of the neutrino, and studying the process of double beta decay will lead to understanding the nature of the neutrino such as whether it is its own anti-particle (Majorana) or not (Dirac). The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) searched for neutrino-less double beta decay of the 136Xe nucleus. If neutrino-less double beta decay is discovered, it will be evidence of Majorana neutrinos and physics beyond the Standard Model EXO-200 completed data-taking in 2018 and discussion of the construction, operation and final results will be presented. The plans for the next-generation nEXO experiment will also be presented.

Speaker: Lisa Kaufman, SLAC

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/what’s-least-1015x-the-age-the-universe-the-search-for-neutrino-less-double-beta-decay

Cost: Free

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Monday, 03/02/20
07:30 PM – 09:00 PM

Benjamin Dean Astronomy Lectures
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Unlocking the Atmospheres of Extrasolar Worlds

Extrasolar planets now number in the thousands, spanning a wide range of orbital and physical properties. Unlocking the atmospheric properties of these exotic worlds using facilities such as the Spitzer Space Telescope and Hubble Space Telescope have enabled us to probe chemistry, radiation and weather regimes beyond our own solar system. This talk will describe key observations to understand the atmospheres of extrasolar planets with comparisons to three-dimensional models, and how these models inform comparative exoplanet studies using current and future ground- and space-based telescopes, including the James Webb Space Telescope.

Speaker: Tiffany Kataria, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/unlocking-the-atmospheres-of-extrasolar-worlds

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

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Monday, 03/02/20
08:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Verdi Club
2424 Mariposa St
San Francisco, CA 94110

Wonderfest: Ask a Science Envoy: Kids & AI, Parasites, Dark Matter`

Wonderfest Science Envoys are early-career researchers with special communication skills and aspirations. Following short talks on provocative modern science topics, these three Science Envoys will answer questions with insight and enthusiasm:

• UC Berkeley psychologist Eliza Kosoy on “How Children Are Smarter Than AI”
• Stanford microbiologist Alma Mendoza on “The Most Successful Parasite”
• Stanford astrophysicist Jed Thompson on “What We Know (and some of what we don’t) About Dark Matter.”

Website: https://wonderfest.org/kidsai-parasites-darkmatter/

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 03/03/20
11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Gravitational wave astrophysics and cosmology – planning for the future

Speaker: Antonella Palmese, Fermilab

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/joint-kipac-tea-talk-and-slacmass-gravitational-wave-astrophysics-and-cosmology-planning

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 03/03/20 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Einstein’s Microscope: Uncovering Small-Scale Dark Matter Structures with Novel Gravitational Lensing Probes

The physical nature of the astrophysical dark matter (DM) is a fundamental question in cosmology. The clustering structure of DM on sub-galactic scales is key to distinguishing between various viable DM models which all make successful predictions about the large-scale structure and galaxy formation, but empirical tests have been fundamentally hindered by the lack of electromagnetic tracers of sub-galactic structures. In this talk, I aim to introduce novel and practical gravitational-lensing based methods which can be employed to push forward this research frontier. I will first discuss the new phenomenon of extremely magnified cosmological sources as deep imaging of strong lensing clusters has recently started to uncover, and explain how this phenomenon can be exploited as a sensitive probe of compact halo objects, non-luminous DM subhalos smaller than those who host dwarf galaxies, and even (sub-)planetary mass DM minihalos as expected in the axion DM scenario. The full scientific potential of these new ideas will be realized as forthcoming photometric surveys will greatly expand the catalog of highly magnified lensed galaxies and deep follow-up observations with space-borne or ground-based optical/infrared telescopes will enable detailed studies of their lensed appearances. I will also discuss the exciting prospect to exploit lensing of alternative extragalactic sources such as gravitational waves from merging black holes to probe small-scale DM lenses. In particular, I will explain how one can extract unique information by observing wave diffraction of gravitational waves, which would be typically infeasible with electromagnetic sources.

Speaker: Liang Dai, IAS

The speaker originally scheduled for today, Dan Gruen, has been rescheduled for April 28.

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 03/03/20
04:30 PM – 05:30 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 200
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Quantum Optical Control of Levitated Solids: a novel probe for the gravity-quantum interface

Prof. Markus Aspelmeyer of the University of Vienna will give the Applied Physics/Physics colloquium.

Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/quantum-optical-control-levitated-solids-novel-probe-gravity-quantum-interface

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 03/03/20
06:30 PM – 10:00 PM

Public Works
161 Erie St
San Francisco, CA 94103

Odd Salon: Monumental-check out first talk

Kelly Jensen ~ James Lick’s Great Pyramid Scheme
Long before the TransAmerica Pyramid caused an uproar in Architectural circles, there were plans to erect a pyramid tomb larger than Great Pyramid of Giza in downtown San Francisco, dedicated to disagreeable millionaire James Lick. The story of why there’s a dead rich guy in the base of California’s first astronomical observatory is even weirder than you’d expect.

Stuart Gripman ~ L’elephant Triomphal: The Proposed Pachyderm Party Pad that Spawned a Fop Fight
In 1748 the city of Paris made plans to honor King Louis XV with a truly exceptional monument: a gigantic elephant shaped party house to be placed in the center of the city for all to admire. But, like so many bold architectural plans featuring a dining room in an elephant’s ass, the critics came out of the woodwork to raise their petty concerns and get in the way of visionary monuments.

Mark Lindsey ~ Thank the Giant Ground Sloth for your Avocado Toast
Among the largest mammals to have ever walked the Earth, the gigantic Megatherium, or Giant Sloth, was the size of a mammoth, and survived up until as recently as 10,000 years ago near the rivers and lakes of South America walking on enormous claws, eating’ stuff and co-evolving with … the avocado.

Rebecca Pelassini ~ Far from Rome: the Journey of Cleopatra’s Needles
It might seem odd that there is an ancient Egyptian obelisk standing in New York City, held up by crabs. It might also seem odd that this is one of three such obelisks called “Cleopatra’s Needles” (despite not being built by or for Cleopatra) that are no longer anywhere near Egypt. But both are true, and the practical logistics of transporting a 69 foot, 220 ton stone overseas were monumentally epic.

Amy Widdowson ~ The Children’s Crusade: Medieval Influencers & Epic Fails
In 1212, a pre-teen preacher led an army of tens of thousands of children out of Europe on foot, over hundreds of miles to re-colonize the Holy Land. What could possibly go wrong? [spoilers: pretty much everything.]

Website: https://www.oddsalon.com/salon/odd-salon-sf-monumental/

Cost: $12/15 General, $25 Reserved

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Wednesday, 03/04/20
07:00 PM – 08:30 PM

Silicon Valley Astronomy Lecture Series
Foothill College
Smithwick Theater
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Vera Rubin Observatory: The Most Comprehensive Survey of the Sky Ever Undertaken

The Vera Rubin Observatory, on a mountaintop in Chile, will house a survey telescope that will image the night sky faster and deeper than ever before. Its camera, at 3.6 Gigapixels, will be the biggest digital camera ever built. The Rubin Observatory will be able to image the entire visible sky every few nights, and build up, over 10 years, a 900-frame full color movie of the deep night sky. This will enable a wide variety of scientific explorations, from the outer reaches of our Solar System, through our Milky Way Galaxy and its dark matter halo, and out into the extra-galactic universe, where we hope to see new types of cosmic explosions and the weird effects of the mysterious Dark Energy. Dr. Marshall will give a guided tour of the Rubin Observatory, describe the planned sky survey, discuss the challenges of doing astronomy at petabyte scale, and show how we can all take part in Rubin’s voyage of discovery.

Speaker: Phil Marshall is Senior Staff Scientist at Stanford’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/o/silicon-valley-astronomy-lecture-series-1085379845

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 03/05/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
SLAC Fred Kavli Building (51) 3rd Fl Conference Room
2575 Sand Hill Rd
Menlo Park, CA 94305

21cm Intensity Mapping

Speaker: Anže Slosar (Brookhaven National Laboratory)

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/21cm-intensity-mapping

Cost: Free

Comment: Odd that there are website announcemnts for this lecture both for 3/5 and 3/6 in the same place. Should call SLAC to get clarification.

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Friday, 03/06/20
10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

21cm Intensity Mapping – planning for the future

Speaker: Anže Slosar (Brookhaven National Laboratory)

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/joint-kipac-tea-talk-and-slacmass-21cm-intensity-mapping-planning-future

Cost: Free

Comment: Odd that there are website announcemnts for this lecture both for 3/5 and 3/6 in the same place. Should call SLAC to get clarification.

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Friday, 03/06/20 12:00 PM

Earth and Marine Sciences Building
UC Santa Cruz
Room A340
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

Testing the Impact Hypothesis for Warming Early Mars

Speaker: Kathryn Steakley, NASA Ames

Editor’s Note: This talk was originally scheduled for October 11, 2019

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/winter-2020.html

Cost: Free

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Friday, 03/06/20 8:00 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
College of San Mateo
1700 W Hillsdale Blvd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Neutrinos: The Ghosts of the Standard Model of Particle Physics

Speaker: Dr. Micah Buuck, Stanford

Lecture held in Planetarium

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/meetings.html

Cost: Free

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Fri. 03/06/2020 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

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Fri. 03/06/2020 and Sat. 03/07/2020

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri 03/06/2020 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 03/07/2020 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 03/07/20
07:30 PM – 10:30 PM

City Star Parties – Point Lobos
USS San Francisco Memorial
El Camino Del Mar
San Francisco, CA 94121

City Star Party – Lands End

Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.
Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/event/san-francisco-city-star-party-lands-end-4/?instance_id=1700

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 03/07/20
07:30 PM – 09:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

Fantasy Flights to the Moon

This talk is in part based on the same section in my new major lunar observers handbook, Luna Cognita. The 3-volume set is scheduled to be published by Springer before the end of this year. Harrison Schmitt of Apollo 17 wrote the Introduction. The book is available on Amazon right now for pre-publication orders.

Speaker: Bob Garfinkle, Author

Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/269000315/

Cost: Free

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Monday, 03/09/20 5:30 PM

International House
UC Berkeley
Chevron Auditorium
Berkeley, CA 94720

The Quantum Origins of Gravity

It was once thought that gravity and quantum mechanics were inconsistent with one another. Instead, we are discovering that they are so closely connected that one can almost say they are the same thing. In this lecture, Professor Susskind will explain how this view came into being over the last two decades, and illustrate how a number of gravitational phenomena have their roots in the ordinary principles of quantum mechanics.

Speaker: Leonard Susskind, Stanford

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20200309/2020-oppenheimer-lecture-featuring-leonard-susskind

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 03/10/20
04:30 PM – 05:30 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 200
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Black Holes Critical Behavior in the Sky

Prof. Andrew Strominger of Harvard University will give the Applied Physics/Physics colloquium.

Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/black-holes-critical-behavior-sky

Cost: Free

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Fri Mar 13, 2020 8:15pm – 10:15pm

Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr.
San Jose, CA 95124

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA’s In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/267475823/

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Fri. 03/13/2020 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot’s TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a “tool” (typically around $100 – $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start “pushin’ glass!” We supply you with instruction, the various grits you’ll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time – depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it’s a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres@eastbayastro.org or phone (510) 406-1914.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

==================================

Fri. 03/13/2020 and Sat. 03/14/2020

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot’s telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm – 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 03/13/2020 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory’s computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening’s viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 03/14/2020 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

===================================

Sunday, 03/15/20 6:00 PM

East Bay Astronomical Society
Chabot Space & Science Center, 10000 Skyline Blvd
2nd Floor, Spees Bldg, Galileo Room
Oakland, CA 94619

Observing the Sky: (Some) Astronomical Innovation From Then to Now, and Annual Dinner

For more than 2000 years, innovative people have applied their ideas and insights into observing the universe. Unknown thousands of years ago, visual observers named sets of stars from the patterns they saw, sometimes using myths or animals, real or imagined, in their environments for the names. This became a convenience for astrologers and others talking about the sky. Planets were discovered and calendars were invented, and precession was discovered. Even computers and observatories were invented. More than a millennium ago, the first instruments for measuring star positions were invented. Used for surveying and navigation, improvements on these instruments and the developments of new ones led to new discoveries, especially when combined with new mathematical methods for calculation.

The invention of the telescope changed everything. Mountains and craters were visible on the Moon. Those moving points in the sky turned out not to be… worlds(?)! With moons! Telescopes and their mounts were improved, new inventions were adapted, and new methods of observation were applied to old and new problems by astronomers. The spectroscope, chemical photography, and the use of electricity and electronics literally opened up the universe to astronomers.

Speaker: Steve Edberg, NASA JPL, retired

See weblink for tickets.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

Cost: $10 Lecture only, $45 includes dinner

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