BayAstro – Events of Week of 04/20/2020 and Beyond

The BayAstro group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Due to concerns about the spread of the Coronavirus or COVID-19 virus, some events have been or may be cancelled. Many venues will be closed to the end of March and some, perhaps, into April. Other events may offer online links and connections. To check on the status of a given event, check their website for updates.

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Tuesday, 04/21/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics
See weblink for connection information
Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/550904854

Or iPhone one-tap (US Toll): +18333021536,,550904854# or +16507249799,,550904854#

Or Telephone:
Dial: +1 650 724 9799 (US, Canada, Caribbean Toll) or +1 833 302 1536 (US, Canada, Caribbean Toll Free)

Meeting ID: 550 904 854
International numbers available: https://stanford.zoom.us/u/abdiZPiQDr

Meeting ID: 550 904 854
SIP: 550904854@zoomcrc.com

Measure Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations using galaxies and voids – Livestream
Speaker: Andrei Variu, École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/measure-baryonic-acoustic-oscillations-using-galaxies-and-voids

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 04/22/20
07:00 PM – 08:00 PM

SETI Institute
Once again, we are planning to hold this month’s SETI Talk online. Registration is required in order to receive the link and password; however, capacity is limited. Access will be on a first come first serve basis. Once the virtual room reaches capacity, we will not be able to accommodate more people. We apologize for this inconvenience, but have experienced large numbers of registrations for people who are unable to participate at the last minute, leaving others unable to register. As always, SETI talks will be recorded and available to everyone after it takes place.

Fast Radio Bursts: A long-standing mystery about to end? – Livestream

In 2007, astronomers detected a radio signal from the sky that was unlike any seen before. It lasted only a
millisecond but was extremely bright. Even more unexpectedly, its characteristics implied that it arrived from an unidentified galaxy billions of light-years away. This type of explosion, more powerful than anything ever observed at similar wavelengths and timescales, is now termed a Fast Radio Burst (FRB).

During the last decades, astronomers have reported the existence of more FRBs, which have become one of the hottest topics in astronomy. They seem to be a common phenomenon; astronomers have detected more than 100 FRBs, and some estimates are that thousands reach Earth every day.

However, we still don’t understand what causes these powerful explosions. They are tremendously energetic, and the flashes come from billions of light-years away, and something over there can muster sufficient energy to produce a signal detectable here on Earth. Could these signals be due to aliens?

To tell us more about the nature of the FRBs and elaborate on their true nature, we invited two radio astronomers.

• Daniele Michilli is a Banting Fellow at McGill University. He works with CHIME (Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment), a new Canadian radio telescope located in Penticton, British Columbia, which is discovering hundreds of new FRBs, including one showing periodic activity.
• Wael Farah, a researcher who recently joined the SETI Institute, has developed the FRB detection system. This AI-based software that has detected several FRBs in real-time at the Molonglo Radio Observatory near Canberra, Australia.
Both researchers will tell us how their current and future work using CHIME and the Allen Telescope Array could unveil the true nature of those FRBs and how their study could help understand our Universe.

Website: https://www.seti.org/event/seti-talks-virtual-edition-fast-radio-bursts-long-standing-mystery-about-end

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 04/23/20
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

KIPAC Astrophysics Colloquium

Attacking from All Sides: A Dynamic, Colorful Approach to the AGN Phenomenon – Livestream
Speaker: Kriata Lynne Smith, KIPAC
See weblink for Zoom information.

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/attacking-all-sides-dynamic-colorful-approach-agn-phenomenon

Cost: Free

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Friday, 04/24/20
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics
See weblink for Zoom information.

Rubin Observatory LSST camera systematics: imperfect pixels, satellite streaks, and metal shavings – Livestream
Speaker: Andrew Bradshaw, KIPAC

This talk was originally scheduled for March 27.

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/rubin-observatory-lsst-camera-systematics-imperfect-pixels-satellite-streaks-and-metal

Cost: Free

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Friday, April 24, 7pm Pacific Time

Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, AZ

Nationwide Livestream Star Party
NATIONWIDE LIVESTREAM STAR PARTY

Join us for a livestream star party featuring astronomers and observatories from around the nation. You’ll get to see what the night sky looks like nationwide from the comfort of your very own living room.

Access to the livestream: cfa.harvard.edu/flwo/youtube

Hosted by Amy C. Oliver (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, NASA/JPL SSA, Arizona) and astronomers from across the nation.

Amy Oliver
Email: amy.oliver@cfa.harvard.edu

Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/264213598072073

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 04/25/20
07:30 PM – 09:00 PM

East Bay Astronomical Society

Chabot Observatory’s role in the Apollo 13 Rescue – Livestream

In April, 1970 an explosion occurred aboard the Apollo 13 spacecraft as it neared the Moon. All around the world various people leapt into action to help save the astronauts’ lives. One of the most unusual examples of this occurred at the old Chabot Observatory in Oakland. A number of scientifically enthusiastic young high school and college kids tracked the Apollo 13 Capsule with several of the large telescopes there. It was my very great privilege to be one of those kids. Under the brilliant and energetic leadership of Dr. Terry Galloway, who had recently received his PhD from Caltech, we provided information that helped confirm that Apollo 13 was on the correct trajectory to safely return to earth.

In my talk, I will use images, charts, old newspapers, the Apollo 13 accident report, videos from various documentaries about Apollo 13, as well as the Ron Howard movie to describe the incident. I will go into some substantial detail as to what the profile of a “normal” Apollo mission would be like, why and how the Apollo 13 accident occurred, and how the accident lead to a deviation from normal navigational procedures. This made Chabot’s and other observatories optical observations more important to insure that Apollo 13 was on the correct path, especially the night before reentry.
I’ll describe how magical, majestic and beautiful the command and service module and the third stage of the Saturn Five looked through Rachel, the 20 inch refractor at Chabot, as they stately drifted through space. I will discuss the normal role and function of the deep space network and how it changed on this mission, as well as a very little known but very important fact about the DSN that puts the story into a very different light. I will also tell the amazing and unbelievable story of how our efforts at Chabot Observatory became a remarkable example of how important astronomy outreach can be and how it changed the future!

Finally, for fun, we will see a couple of segments from the Ron Howard Apollo 13 movie (which, to make clear, I love!) and we will play the “How many scientific, engineering, and factual errors can you find?” game.

Speaker: David Rodrigues, East Bay Astronomical Society

See weblink for connection information

Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/868124450369347/

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/27/20 12:00 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Not sure if this event is being held virtually. Can contact this person for inquiries.
Mark Hayden, the TAC’s Administrative Assistant, at markhayden@berkeley.edu

Supermassive black hole binaries in the era of multi-messenger astrophysics

Speaker: Tamara Bogdanovic, Georgia Tech

Website: https://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/

Cost: Free

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Friday, 05/01/20
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM

Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics

Spatially Resolved UV Diagnostics of AGN Feedback: Radiation Pressure Dominates in a Prototypical Quasar-driven Superwind- Livestream

Galactic-scale winds driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are often invoked to suppress star formation in galaxy evolution models, but the mechanisms driving these outflows are hotly debated. Two key AGN feedback models are (1) radiation pressure accelerating cool gas and (2) a hot outflowing wind entraining the interstellar medium (ISM). Highly ionized emission-line diagnostics represent a powerful means of differentiating these scenarios because of their sensitivity to the expected compression of the ISM clouds by the hot wind. Here, we report the first spatially resolved UV emission spectroscopy of a prototypical (radio-quiet) quasar-driven superwind around the obscured quasar SDSS J1356+1026 at z = 0.123. We observe ratios of O vi/C iv, N v/C iv, and C iv/He ii that are remarkably similar for outflowing gas clouds ≲100 pc and ≈10 kpc from the nucleus. Such similarity is expected for clouds with AGN radiation-pressure-dominated dynamics. Comparing the observed line emission to models of clouds in balance with radiation pressure and/or a hot wind, we rule out the presence of a dynamically important hot wind and constrain the ratio of hot gas pressure to radiation pressure to Phot/Prad ≲ 0.25 both at ≲100 pc and ≈10 kpc from the nucleus. Moreover, the predictions of the radiation pressure confined cloud models that best fit observed UV line ratios are consistent with the observed diffuse X-ray spectrum. These results indicate that this AGN superwind is driven by radiation pressure or was driven by a hot wind that has since dissipated despite ongoing AGN activity

Speaker: Sean Johnson, Princeton

See weblink for Zoom information

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/spatially-resolved-uv-diagnostics-agn-feedback-radiation-pressure-dominates-prototypical

Cost: Free

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