BayAstro – Events of Week of 06/15/2020 and Beyond

The BayAstro group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Due to concerns about the spread of the Coronavirus or COVID-19 virus, some events have been or may be cancelled. Many venues will be closed to the end of March and some, perhaps, into April. Other events may offer online links and connections. To check on the status of a given event, check their website for updates.
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Tuesday, 06/16/20
06:00 PM – 07:00 PM

KIPAC Public Lectures
• Watch this event live via Zoom (meeting ID 992 1875 1554)

Tiny Galaxies in a Dark Universe – Livestream
Speaker: Risa Wechsler, Stanford

The Universe is filled with tiny galaxies. Some of these contain a billion times fewer stars than our own Milky Way — as little as a few hundred stars. These small galaxies can provide clues to the onset of galaxy formation as well as to the nature of dark matter that makes up more than eighty percent of the mass in the Universe. KIPAC Director Risa Wechsler will describe new discoveries of these galaxies in our Galactic backyard and what they can teach us about the dark universe and the ways it lights up.

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/tiny-galaxies-dark-universe

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 06/17/20
07:00 PM – 08:00 PM

SETI Institute
Register at weblink to obtain connection information.

Early Asteroid Impact Detection: Defending the Planet One Asteroid at a Time – Livestream

In honor of Asteroid Day, we are pleased to present a special virtual talk on asteroids, and more specifically, on Planetary Defense.

Could an asteroid strike our planet in the future? Astronomers think so since thousands of near-earth asteroids (NEAs) cross our planet’s path. However, the good news is that an asteroid impact is a preventable large-scale disaster. NASA has recently opened a Planetary Defense Coordination Office to manage its ongoing mission of so-called “Planetary Defense.” One of the programs is to find, track, and characterize at least 90 percent of the predicted number of NEAs that are at least 140 meters — bigger than a small football stadium — and characterize a subset of them, so we develop projects to deflect them if needed.

How are NEAs found and tracked? What are the expected NEA close approaches?

We invited two researchers closely involved in the early detection program for Planetary Defense to discuss the way astronomers search characterize them:

• Larry Denneau, an astronomer at the University of Hawaii, is a co-PI of ATLAS, an asteroid impact early warning system which consists of two telescopes, 100 miles apart, which automatically scan the whole sky several times every night looking for moving objects.
• Amy Mainzer, professor at the University of Arizona, will tell us how space-based infrared telescopes like NEOWISE and the planned Near-Earth Object Surveillance Mission (NEOSM), are designed to survey the Solar System for potentially hazardous asteroids.
These astronomers will describe these instruments, the challenge of funding, building, operating them and, of course, the difficulty of processing such a large amount of data to make great discoveries. They will also discuss how this tedious work could one day save us from a catastrophic event for our civilization.

Website: https://www.seti.org/event/early-asteroid-impact-detection-defending-planet-one-asteroid-time

Cost: Free

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Friday, 06/19/20
08:00 PM – 09:00 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center

The Sky this Month – Livestream

Join Chabot’s astronomers, with Gerald McKeegan & Don Saito on Facebook Live for a short tour of May’s nighttime sky. Learn to recognize many of this month’s constellations and bright stars, and even learn a little about celestial navigation!

Streaming at Chabot’s Facebook Live page. See weblink for info.

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/the-sky-this-month-4

Cost: Free

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Friday, 06/19/20
Start Time 7:30 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers
Email to: president@trivalleystargazers.org for password

Lick Observatory During Pandemic Times: 1918 and 2020 – Livestream

Lick Observatory has been doing ground-breaking research since its opening in 1888. Pandemics create challenging times for any organization, so I’ll explain how Lick Observatory was affected by the Spanish Flu in 1918 and is affected by COVID-19 in 2020, highlighting the exciting research being done in both eras.

Speaker: Dr. Elinor Gates, Lick Observatory

See weblink to obtain Zoom information by emailing the club president.

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

Cost: Free

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Friday, 06/19/20 8:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Society
check weblink and click “Request to join”

Astronomy 101: Sights of the Cosmos, Intro to Astronomy – Livestream

This event provides a different introduction to astronomy than our Intro to the Night Sky talks. During this hour, you’ll gain an appreciation for the size and scale of the cosmos and our place within it. You’ll see many examples of the beautiful objects visible in the night sky, learn something about how we see them through our telescopes and what we can deduce about them through the light they send us. And then you can make your own prediction of whether we’re alone in the universe.

This talk is free of charge. Just come and enjoy the show. And because the coronavirus situation is still preventing us from meeting in person, this event will once again be an ON-LINE, STREAMING event.

Speaker: Wolf Witt

Register to obtain connection information

Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/271136240/

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 06/20/20
09:30 PM – 11:00 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center
check weblink below

Virtual Telescope Viewing – Livestream

Join our resident astronomers on Facebook Live every Saturday evening live from Chabot’s Observation deck! Each week, our astronomers will guide us through spectacular night sky viewing through Nellie, Chabot‘s most powerful telescope. Weather permitting we will be able to view objects live through the telescopes and our astronomers will be available for an open forum for all of your most pressing astronomy questions.
Streaming at Chabot’s Facebook Live page. See weblink for info.

Other Dates For This Event:
• Saturday, 06/20/20
• Saturday, 06/27/20

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/free-telescope-viewings/2020-06-20/

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 06/24/20
11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

Computer History Museum

Maintenance and Invention: Lessons from Hubble – Livestream

In her new book, Handprints on Hubble: An Astronaut’s Story of Invention, the first American woman to walk in space recounts her experience as part of the team that launched, rescued, repaired, and maintained the Hubble Space Telescope.

The Hubble Space Telescope has revolutionized our understanding of the universe. It has, among many other achievements, revealed thousands of galaxies in what seemed to be empty patches of sky; transformed our knowledge of black holes; found dwarf planets with moons orbiting other stars, and measured precisely how fast the universe is expanding.

In this conversation with CHM’s David C. Brock, Kathryn Sullivan will explore the lessons that her experiences with the Hubble Space Telescope taught her about the importance of maintenance, invention, and leadership. Sullivan and other astronauts, engineers, and scientists launched, rescued, repaired, and maintained Hubble, the most productive observatory ever built.

What are the lessons about maintenance and repair from this previously untold story of Hubble? How do they apply more broadly? How did these lessons shape Sullivan’s career after NASA, as chief scientist, and then Deputy Administrator and Administrator of NOAA, the National Oceanic, and Atmospheric Administration? Join us as we explore these fascinating questions, and ask questions of your own.

Register at weblink to obtain connection information.

Website: https://computerhistory.org/events/handprints-on-hubble/

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 06/27/20 7:30 PM

Astronomy Nights on Mt. Tamalpais
Check weblink below

Astrobiology Under Our Feet & Out to the Stars – Livestream

The Age of Astrobiology has begun. We have a whole Solar System – and a galaxy of star-warmed worlds beyond – to explore for life. How do we look for life here and way out there? How will we know it when we find it? Our exploration begins at Earth. We must apply what we are learning about our own amazing home planet to our search for life beyond.

Speaker: Penny Boston, NASA

Website: http://www.friendsofmttam.org/astronomy/schedule

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 06/30/20
06:00 PM – 07:00 PM

Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics
See weblink for details

Supermassive Black Holes: Monsters Lurking in the Hearts of Galaxies
Speaker: Dan Wilkins, Stanford

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/supermassive-black-holes-monsters-lurking-hearts-galaxies

Cost: Free

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