BayAstro – Events of Week of 11/02/2020 and Beyond

The BayAstro group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Due to concerns about the spread of the Coronavirus or COVID-19 virus, some events have been or may be cancelled. Many venues will be closed perhaps until the end of the year. Other events may offer online links and connections. To check on the status of a given event, check their website for updates.
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Monday, 11/02/20 4:15 PM

UC Berkeley

Cosmology in the era of multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves – Livestream

Motivated by the exciting prospect of a new wealth of information arising from the first observations of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation from the same astrophysical phenomena, the Dark Energy Survey (DES) has established a search and discovery program for the optical transients associated with LIGO/Virgo events (DESGW). Using the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), DESGW has contributed to the discovery of the optical transient associated with the neutron star merger GW170817, and produced the first cosmological measurements using gravitational wave events as standard sirens. After three successful observing campaigns, I present, in this talk, an overview of our results and their implications for the emerging field of multi-messenger cosmology with gravitational waves and optical data.

Speaker: Marcelle Soares – Santos, University of Michigan

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20201102/cosmology-in-the-era-of-multi-messenger-astronomy-with-gravitational

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 11/03/20
12:30 PM – 02:15 PM

Introductory Class: Being a Tourist in the Solar System and the Galaxy – Livestream

You are invited on a spectacularly illustrated Tourist Tour of the Solar System and the Galaxy with astronomer Andrew Fraknoi.

* Tuesdays, 12:30 PM – 2:15 PM, Oct. 13 through Nov. 3 (Four Meeting Days)

* Offered through the SF State Osher Life-long Learning Institute (OLLI), but open to anyone over age 50.

Have you recently had an irresistible desire to get off planet Earth and be somewhere else? Then join the scientist who is often called the Bay Area’s public astronomer on a fun tour of the not-to-be-missed “tourist sights” among the planets and moons with which we share the Sun, and among the nearby stars, glowing clouds, and star clusters in our Milky Way Galaxy!

Sign up here.

When you register for the class, if you are not a current member of OLLI, you will be asked to sign up, but it’s a free process.

The class discussion will be accompanied with really dramatic color images from the latest space probes, many of them new. We’ll learn about some of the most interesting vistas in deep space, including:

* the steam geysers on one of Saturn’s moons,

* a cliff on a moon of Uranus’ which is the tallest lovers leap in the solar system

* nearby stars that have intriguing planets that may be habitable

* several glowing columns of cosmic material that are being converted into new stars and new planets right now

* the colorful death-shrouds that surround aging stars in our neighborhood.

Designed like the Rick Steves travel shows on public TV, these tours are for the beginner, and will assume no background in science. Discover how we humans fit into the bigger picture.

Instructor: Andrew Fraknoi retired Chair of the Astronomy Department at Foothill College

Other Dates For This Event:
• Tuesday, 11/03/20

Contact: Kathy Bruin
Email: olli@sfsu.edu

Website: http://www.bayareascience.org/calendar/index.php?eID=29358

Cost: $70

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Saturday, 11/07/20
09:00 PM – 10:30 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center

Virtual Telescope Viewing – Livestream

Join our resident astronomers on Facebook Live every Saturday evening live from Chabot’s Observation deck!

Each week, our astronomers will guide us through spectacular night sky viewing through Nellie, Chabot‘s most powerful telescope. Weather permitting we will be able to view objects live through the telescopes and our astronomers will be available for an open forum for all of your most pressing astronomy questions.

We will go live the Chabot Space & Science Center Facebook page 10-15 minutes before the event. You can find the live video stream on our Facebook page and in the Facebook event discussion. To receive a notification when we go live, “like” Chabot Space & Science Center on Facebook and RSVP that you’re going to this event.

RSVP on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/314470296245037/?event_time_id=347804269578306

Other Dates For This Event:
• Saturday, 11/07/20
• Saturday, 11/14/20
• Saturday, 11/21/20
• Saturday, 11/28/20

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/free-telescope-viewings/2020-10-03

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 11/05/20 6:30 PM

Astronomy on Tap

Astronomy on Tap Santa Cruz: Fast Radio Bursts – Livestream

In 2007, astronomers discovered a peculiar class of objects now called fast radio bursts (FRBs). These events emit light at radio wavelengths for less than a few milliseconds, yet can release as much energy as our Sun does in a day. Sunil Simha (UCSC) and Jay Chittidi (CU Boulder) will talk about the discovery of FRBs, our current understanding of these mysterious events, and a new method that uses FRBs to measure the distribution of matter in the Universe.
Speakers: Sunil Simha and Jay Chittidi, UC Santa Cruz
Link to YouTube Live for presentation.

Website: https://astronomyontap.org/events/

YouTube Live: https://astronomyontap.org/events/

Cost: Free

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Friday, 11/06/20 12:00 PM

institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics
UC Santa Cruz

Can an Early Hot Mars Resolve the Faint Young Sun Paradox? – Livestream

In explaining extensive evidence for past liquid water, the debate on whether Mars was primarily warm and wet or cold and arid 4-Ga ago has continued for decades. The Sun’s luminosity was ~30% lower 4-Ga ago; thus, most Martian climate models struggle to elevate the mean annual surface temperature past the melting point of water. Geothermal basal melting of thick ice sheets may help resolve that paradox. In this work, we model the thermophysical evolution of ice and estimate the geothermal heat flux required to produce meltwater on a cold, arid Mars. We then analyze geophysical and geochemical data, showing that basal melting would have been feasible on Mars 4-Ga ago. Alternatively, if Mars were warm and wet 4-Ga ago, the geothermal flux would have even sustained hydrothermal activity. Accordingly, regardless of the actual nature of the ancient Martian climate, the deep subsurface could have been the most habitable region on Mars.

Speaker: Lujendra Ojha, Rutgers University

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/fall-2020.html

Contact: (831) 459-4089.

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 11/07/20 7:00 PM

East Bay Astronomical Society

Is Anybody Out There? – What is the possibility of other intelligent life in the universe? – Livestream

Can we detect radio, infrared, or optical signals from other civilizations?

Current and future SETI projects may provide an answer.

Berkeley SETI Research Center chief scientist Dan Werthimer will describe the rationale for past and future searches and will show how new technologies are revolutionizing SETI.

Dan will describe Breakthrough Listen, SETI@home, the new PANOSETI wide field all-sky-all-the-time project, as well as concepts for future SETI.

See weblink for Facebook Live link.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EastbayAstroSociety/live

EAS Members will get a Zoom invitation by Email

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 11/07/20
09:00 PM – 10:30 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center

Virtual Telescope Viewing – Livestream
Join our resident astronomers on Facebook Live every Saturday evening live from Chabot’s Observation deck!

Each week, our astronomers will guide us through spectacular night sky viewing through Nellie, Chabot‘s most powerful telescope. Weather permitting we will be able to view objects live through the telescopes and our astronomers will be available for an open forum for all of your most pressing astronomy questions.

We will go live the Chabot Space & Science Center Facebook page 10-15 minutes before the event. You can find the live video stream on our Facebook page and in the Facebook event discussion. To receive a notification when we go live, “like” Chabot Space & Science Center on Facebook and RSVP that you’re going to this event.

RSVP on Facebook.

Other Dates For This Event:
• Saturday, 11/07/20
• Saturday, 11/14/20
• Saturday, 11/21/20
• Saturday, 11/28/20
• Saturday, 12/05/20

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/free-telescope-viewings/2020-10-03

Cost: Free

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Monday, 11/09/20 4:00 PM

What Physicists Do @ Sonoma State University

Dark Matter – Livestream

Speaker: Dr. Emilija Pantic, UC Davis

See weblink for Zoom information.

Website: http://phys-astro.sonoma.edu/wpd/wpdcurrent.shtml

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 11/11/20
07:00 PM – 08:30 PM

Silicon Valley Astronomy Lectures

Planet 9 from Outer Space: Searching for a Distant Planet in our Solar System – Livestream

Just when the world was finally getting used to only having eight planets orbiting the Sun, the presence of a new ninth one is slowly coming into view at the edge of the solar system. This planet — Planet Nine — is inferred from of its gravitational effects shaping the disk of small icy bodies beyond Neptune known as the Kuiper belt. Dr. Brown will talk about the history of planetary discovery (and demotion), why we think a new one is on the verge of being found, and the techniques that we are using to try to find this very faint body lurking in the far reaches of our planetary system.

Speaker: Dr. Michael Brown is a Professor of Planetary Astronomy at the California Institute of Technology.

YouTube link below to view. Lecture will be available at this link afterwards also.

Website: https://www.youtube.com/user/SVAstronomyLectures

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 11/12/20 7:30 PM

Bay Area Skeptics

The Debate about Dark Matter: Is the Matter Settled? – Livestream

The observable universe is made of stars and galaxies and gas. However, it is commonly held in the astronomy community that our universe is also made of an invisible substance called dark matter that is five times more common than ordinary matter. However, dark matter has never been observed, and the evidence for its existence is still circumstantial. In this talk, physicist Don Lincoln will give insights into the debate within the scientific community. You will learn about the historical debate, the reasons dark matter is a currently favored theory, and an appreciation for why researchers continue to look into the question.

Speaker: Don Lincoln, Fermilab

See weblink for connection information

Website: http://baskeptics.org/upcomingskeptalk/

YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Il7NKhNAuT8&ab_channel=BayAreaSkeptics

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 11/14/20
07:00 PM – 08:30 PM

Greater Farallones Marine Sanctuary

Virtual Humpback Whale Soirée – HUMPBACK WHALE SONGS AND THE SEARCH FOR ALIEN INTELLIGENCE – Livestream

The study of animal communication challenges our ideas of intelligence and informs the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). Among the most fascinating and sophisticated of vocalizations are the songs and sounds of humpback whales. Laurance Doyle, Ph.D, Research Scientist with SETI Institute will share his studies of humpbacks to understand the communications that exist throughout Planet Earth and beyond.

Website: https://farallones.org/events/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/FarallonesAssoc/live

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 11/14/20
09:00 PM – 10:30 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center

Virtual Telescope Viewing – Livestream

Join our resident astronomers on Facebook Live every Saturday evening live from Chabot’s Observation deck!

Each week, our astronomers will guide us through spectacular night sky viewing through Nellie, Chabot‘s most powerful telescope. Weather permitting we will be able to view objects live through the telescopes and our astronomers will be available for an open forum for all of your most pressing astronomy questions.

We will go live the Chabot Space & Science Center Facebook page 10-15 minutes before the event. You can find the live video stream on our Facebook page and in the Facebook event discussion. To receive a notification when we go live, “like” Chabot Space & Science Center on Facebook and RSVP that you’re going to this event.

RSVP on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/314470296245037/?event_time_id=347804269578306

Other Dates For This Event:
• Saturday, 11/14/20
• Saturday, 11/21/20
• Saturday, 11/28/20
• Saturday, 12/05/20

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/free-telescope-viewings/2020-10-03

Cost: Free

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Saturday, November 14, 2020 ,
SMCAS General meeting at 7:00 p.m. via Zoom videoconference.
Zoom login info will be sent via SMCASNews@groups.io and SMCAS@groups.io

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society

Here Come the Suns: The statistics and habitability of planets in binary star systems

Speaker: Dr. Lea Hirsch

Post Doctoral Research Fellow, KIPAC, Stanford University

Most planet searches focus on single stars, like the sun. But half of all sun-like stars actually live in binary or multiple stellar systems, whose planet-hosting capability may be quite different. Although planets in binary systems are common in pop culture (think Tattoine in Stark Wars, or Gallifrey from Doctor Who), we know far less about them empirically than their counterparts in single star systems. In binary systems, planets can occupy either circum-stellar or circum-binary orbits, but many orbital configurations are thought to be unstable due to the effects of the binary companion. Binaries are also thought to affect the proto-planetary disks of their companions, affecting their ability to form planets at all.

In this talk, I will describe the current state of our theoretical and observational knowledge of the occurrence rates and statistics of planets in binary star systems. I’ll also discuss efforts to simulate the habitability of planets in binaries, which may pass in and out of the so-called habitable zone in their trajectories around one or both of the stars in their system.

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