BayAstro – Events of Week of 03/01/2021 and Beyond

The BayAstro group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Due to concerns about the spread of the Coronavirus or COVID-19 virus, some events have been or may be cancelled. Many venues will be closed perhaps until the end of the year. Other events may offer online links and connections. To check on the status of a given event, check their website for updates.
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Monday, 03/01/21
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

SLAC Special Seminar

The bright future of cosmology with SPT-3G – Livestream

Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) probe a diverse set of fundamental physics in both the early and late universe. CMB measurements are a cornerstone of our now exceptionally precise Lambda-CDM model of cosmology, however, many questions remain. Did an inflationary epoch occur a fraction of a second after the Big Bang? What is the nature of dark energy? Is the Hubble constant controversy new physics or simply measurement systematics? I will describe the SPT-3G receiver that is currently installed on the South Pole Telescope and how it is observing the CMB to answer these questions. Now starting the third year of a five-year survey, SPT-3G data is already providing tantalizing hints about what scientific goalposts will be possible in the very near future. I’ll highlight a few of these opportunities as well as providing perspectives on the upcoming CMB-S4 experiment.

Speaker: Amy Bender, Argonne National Lab
See weblink for Zoom link

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/bright-future-cosmology-spt-3g

Zoom info: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/97495567685?pwd=Zys5cFVFMkxBcFhBak12bDZ4eXlpQT09

Cost: Free

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Monday, 03/01/21
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium

Looking inside the heart of a supernova from underground – Livestream

Core-collapse supernovae host some of the most extreme physical environments in our universe. They play a fundamental role in shaping the world around us, from seeding new star formation to spreading heavy elements around the Galaxy. The extreme physical conditions make them very valuable laboratories for particle physics, nuclear physics and astrophysics. In this talk, I will review the basic mechanism driving these gravity-powered neutrino bombs and then discuss examples of the rich physics that is imprinted on the expected neutrino signal. The DUNE experiment currently under development in the US will provide unique capabilities for observing physical processes in and around the collapsed core.

See weblink for Zoom information

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/looking-inside-the-heart-supernova-underground

Please click the link below to join the webinar: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/93328055841?pwd=V0NKdTFrc21rZ0RyUGNjeDIyM2FxZz09

Or Telephone 650 724 9799 | Webinar ID: 933 2805 5841 | Passcode: 024976

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 03/02/21
08:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Wonderfest

Wonderfest: Prescribed Burns and Exploding Stars – Livestream

• Stanford evironmental scientist Rebecca Miller on “Prescribed Burns in California” – Over the past several years, California has experienced record-breaking wildfire seasons. Recent wildfires have prompted important policy conversations about prescribed burns, fires that are purposefully set to remove ground vegetation and reduce fire risks. What are the challenges that have prevented us from using prescribed burns in California, and how might we wisely expand the use of this valuable fuel treatment?
• UC Berkeley astrophysicist Kishore Patra on “Exploding Stars” – The atoms in everything around us – the oxygen in the air, the carbon in our bodies, the gold in our jewelry – were forged in stellar furnaces. We owe our very existence to stars that died in cataclysmic explosions known as supernovae. What is the cosmic story of our elemental origins? What do we know about supernovae, and how do astronomers study them?

See weblink or Zoom information.

Website: https://wonderfest.org/prescribed-burns-exploding-stars/

Register ONLINE via Zoom, with this link: [https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85443402857]

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 03/03/21 7:00 PM

Astronomy on Tap West Los Angeles and Davis – Two talks
Discovering Other World:

Speakers: Lizvette Villafana and Dakotah Tyler

Our Tiny Old Neighbors: The Milky Way’s Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxies

Speaker: Katy Rodriguez Wimberly

See weblink for YouTube link

Website: http://astronomyontap.org/2021/02/special-joint-event-aot-davis-aot-west-la/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1LbyMeDhUEo&feature=youtu.be

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 03/04/21
12:30 PM – 01:30 PM

SLAC Special Seminar

Searches for New Physics at the Edge of Absolute Zero – Livestream

• Why is there something in the universe instead of nothing?
• What is the nature of the dark matter that constitutes ∼85% of the matter content of the universe?

Each of these two questions brings together physics on the largest of observable scales with the behavior of particles on the smallest of scales. Why matter formed and what caused it to cluster into galaxies and stars are among the most fundamental open questions in physics today. And the answers may lie in understanding the breakdowns of the Standard Model. In this talk, I will discuss the search for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay, a lepton number violating decay that could help explain the matter dominance of the universe. I will describe the CUORE experiment, a tonscale bolometeric detector that searches for this and other rare decays, and the R&D on multiplexed TES sensors that could be instrumental in a next-generation experiment. I will then discuss the axion and its reemergence as a leading dark matter candidate. I will describe the ABRACADABRA-10 cm demonstrator experiment at MIT and present results from its recent searches for axion dark matter. Finally, I will describe the DMRadio program – a joining of ABRACADABRA-10 cm with the DMRadio-Pathfinder program at SLAC – and its prospects of probing some of the most interesting axion dark matter parameter space as a full-fledged, next-generation dark matter experiment.

Speaker: Johathan Ouellet, Massachusets Institute of Technology

See weblink for Zoom link

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/searches-new-physics-edge-absolute-zero

Zoom info: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/97495567685?pwd=Zys5cFVFMkxBcFhBak12bDZ4eXlpQT09

Cost: Free

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Thursday, 03/04/21
06:30 PM – 07:30 PM

UC Riverside

Black Holes: Facts, Myths, and Wishful Thinking – Livestream

In this lecture, Prof. Canalizo will give a brief summary of our current knowledge of black holes. She will introduce some astronomical observations that have allowed us to learn about these fascinating yet mysterious objects, including the exciting recent discoveries regarding the supermassive black hole in our own Milky Way galaxy. The lecture will also discuss popular misconceptions about black holes as well as a few intriguing possibilities (such as time travel) that have not yet been tested.

Speaker: Gabriela Canalizo, UC Riverside

Register at weblink to receive connection information

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astronomy-lecture-black-holes-facts-myths-and-wishful-thinking-registration-139606690369

Cost: Free

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Fri, March 5, 12pm – 1pm

UC Santa Cruz

Speaker: Manoochehr Shirzaei, Virginia Tech

Title: Earth-Observing Satellite Boom and Emerging Hazards in the Era of Climate Change

Abstract: With the global population surpassing 7.8 billion people in 2021, the impacts of human activities on the environment are noticeable almost everywhere on our planet. The consequences of these impacts are still elusive, particularly when trying to quantify them at larger scales. It is essential to trace environmental changes from a local to a global scale over several decades. This task is increasingly fulfilled by Earth-observing (EO) satellites, in particular, radar imaging instruments. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), a cloud-penetrant microwave imaging system, provides unique day-night and all-weather monitoring capabilities. The availability of repeated SAR acquisitions with similar imaging geometry allows performing interferometric SAR (InSAR) processing. InSAR uses radar to illuminate an area of the Earth’s surface and measures the change in distance between satellite and ground surface, as well as the returned signal strength. Such measurements are suitable for generating high-resolution digital elevation models and accurate terrain deformation maps. Here, I discuss some of the recent advances in developing modern multitemporal InSAR algorithms. Next, I present examples demonstrating the value of high-resolution Radar EO satellite data for mapping surface deformation with implications for sea-level rise, coastal flooding hazards, and quantifying droughts’ impact on groundwater resources. Firstly, I report on high-resolution vertical land motion measurements along the U.S. coast obtained from InSAR, spanning 2003-2020. The findings include subsidence rates of up to several millimeters per year affecting different parts of the U.S. West and Gulf coasts, particularly deltas, wetlands, artificial landfills, and Holocene mud deposits. For instance, a subsidence rate of 2-10 mm/yr affects most coastal areas along San Francisco Bay. Furthermore, it is estimated that between 4.3-8.7 million people in California’s coastal communities are exposed to subsidence. In combination with future projections of sea-level rise under different climate warming scenarios, it is estimated that in San Francisco Bay and Houston, an area of 125 km2-429 km2 and 186 km2-1157 km2, respectively, will be subject to inundation and flooding by 2100. Secondly, I present results from an interdisciplinary study of the response of aquifer systems in California’s Central Valley to the drought periods of 2007-2010 and 2012-2015. The findings show that during droughts, the land subsidence modulated with a seasonal variation independent of the winter precipitation. The subsidence continues beyond the drought periods, although the groundwater levels have already stopped declining. It is estimated that maximum subsidence rates in the southern San Joaquin Valley are up to ~25 cm/yr and ~35 cm/yr for the 1st and 2nd droughts, respectively. Also, the groundwater loss of 21.3±7.2 km3 for the entire Central Valley during 2007-2010 and 29.3±8.7 km3 for the San Joaquin Valley during 2012-2015 is obtained. The subsidence-based estimates of groundwater loss are consistent with that of GRACE gravimetric satellites, considering uncertainty ranges. It is also found that due to overdraft, the aquifer system storage capacity was permanently reduced by up to 5%. These sets of case studies highlight the importance of EO satellite data for developing management, adaptation, and resilience plans.

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/winter-2021.html

Zoom Meeting 93026775152
Passcode 826619

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Saturday, 03/06/21
09:00 PM – 10:30 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center

Virtual Telescope Viewing – Livestream

Join our resident astronomers on Facebook Live every Saturday evening live from Chabot’s Observation deck!

Each week, our astronomers will guide us through spectacular night sky viewing through Nellie, Chabot‘s most powerful telescope. Weather permitting we will be able to view objects live through the telescopes and our astronomers will be available for an open forum for all of your most pressing astronomy questions.

Other Dates For This Event:
• Saturday, 03/06/21
• Saturday, 03/13/21
• Saturday, 03/20/21
• Saturday, 03/27/21

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/free-telescope-viewings/2021-01-02/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCarFXs-04xmdHW_PVc7LWRg

Cost: Free

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Monday, 03/08/21
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

Gamma-ray Bursts: Nature’s Most Remarkable Cosmic Explosions – Livestream

First discovered serendipitously in 1967, the phenomena known as gamma-ray bursts – short-lived, extremely bright flashes of high-energy radiation – mystified astronomers for decades. Despite many breakthroughs, key open questions – such as the mechanism responsible for the prompt gamma-ray emission, as well as a detailed characterization of their progenitor systems – remain open. In this talk I’ll review several recent results, including 1) the discovery of very high-energy (TeV) gamma-rays from ground-based Cherenkov detectors; 2) the association of a peculiar short gamma-ray burst with the binary neutron star merger GW170817; and 3) prospects for utilizing these events as probes of the early universe and the epoch of reionization.

Speaker: Brad Cenko, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

See weblink for Zoom information

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/gamma-ray-bursts-nature’s-most-remarkable-cosmic-explosions

zoom TBA

Cost: Free

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Monday, 03/08/21 5:30 PM

UC Santa Cruz

A fireside chat with two pioneers in science, Sandra M. Faber and Kathryn D. Sullivan – Livestream

We are thrilled to invite you to an inspiring conversation with two of our most prominent trailblazers in science, and who we are proud to say will be distinctly honored in our transformed Science & Engineering Library.

The conversation will explore their incredible careers and the influence UC Santa Cruz has had on their unparalleled success. Among many of their accomplishments, for instance, Sandra co-led the largest project in the history of the Hubble Space Telescope, an undertaking that extended our view of galaxy formation back nearly to the Big Bang, while Kathryn was part of the team that launched, rescued, repaired, and maintained the Hubble Space Telescope. The list of their accomplishments, recognitions, and awards is unmatched. What inspired them to pursue these exceptional careers? What is next for them? What are their hopes for our current students?

Speakers: Sandra Faber, UC Santa Cruz emerita; Kathryn Sullivan, Astronaut; Beth Shapiro, UC Santa Cruz, Moderator

Register at weblink to receive connection information

Website: https://calendar.ucsc.edu/event/a_fireside_chat_with_two_pioneers_in_science_sandra_m_faber_and_kathryn_d_sullivan#.YDMnLy2cbEY

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 03/09/21 3:30 PM

UC Santa Cruz

The Fate of Water on Mars: Tracing Water-rock Interactions Through Modelling, Satellites, and Rovers – Livestream

Speaker: Eva Scheller, Cal Tech

See weblink for Zoom information

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/whole-earth-seminars/winter-2021.html

Zoom TBA

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 03/10/21
07:00 PM – 08:30 PM

Silicon Valley Astronomy Series

Lick Observatory During Pandemics: 1918 and 2020 – Livestream

Lick Observatory, the first continuously inhabited mountain-top observatory in the world, has been doing ground-breaking research since its opening in 1888. 30 years after Lick Observatory established itself as a leader in astronomical research, the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic hit the United States. Research, while hampered by the conditions at the time, continued with the dedicated efforts of William Wallace Campbell, Heber Curtis, and other notable astronomers of the day. Dr. Gates will highlight the hot topics of research being done in 1918 and how the observatory persevered through the difficult conditions at the time.

Today we are experiencing another devastating pandemic – COVID-19. Shelter-in-place orders and shutdowns have limited Lick Observatory operations. Additionally, the SCU wildfire disrupted operations and almost destroyed the observatory, creating additional challenges for staff and researchers. Dr. Gates will describe how they have dealt with the challenges and adapted to continue as much research and data acquisition as possible, particularly in the areas of supernovae, exoplanet, and SETI research, as well as commissioning new telescopes and instruments.

Speaker: Dr. Elinor Gates is a staff astronomer at Lick Observatory

YouTube link to watch the lecture. It will be recorded and available later at this same link.

Contact: Andrew Fraknoi
Email: fraknoiandrew@fhda.edu
Phone: 4154845350

Website: https://www.youtube.com/user/SVAstronomyLectures

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 03/13/21
09:00 PM – 10:30 PM

Virtual Telescope Viewing – Livestream

Join our resident astronomers on Facebook Live every Saturday evening live from Chabot’s Observation deck!

Each week, our astronomers will guide us through spectacular night sky viewing through Nellie, Chabot‘s most powerful telescope. Weather permitting we will be able to view objects live through the telescopes and our astronomers will be available for an open forum for all of your most pressing astronomy questions.

Other Dates For This Event:
• Saturday, 03/13/21
• Saturday, 03/20/21
• Saturday, 03/27/21
• Saturday, 04/03/21

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/free-telescope-viewings/2021-01-02/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCarFXs-04xmdHW_PVc7LWRg

Cost: Free

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Monday, 03/15/21 4:00 PM

What Physicists Do @ Sonoma State University

Instrumentation in Astronomy: Building Cameras to Take Pictures of Extra-Solar Planets – Livestream

Speaker: Dr. Isabel Lipartito, Lockheed Martin Focalplane

Website: http://www.phys-astro.sonoma.edu/wpd/wpdcurrent.shtml

Via Zoom: https://SonomaState.zoom.us/j/87073719017

Cost: Free

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