BayAstro – Events of Week of 04/12/2021 and Beyond

The BayAstro group publishes announcements of interesting events related to astronomy and aerospace in the San Francisco Bay Area. This can include events such as astronomy and interesting physical science lectures, club meetings, star parties, air shows and other events of interest mostly to amateur astronomers and science enthusiasts. Many thanks to Ken Lum, who created this event listing.
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Due to concerns about the spread of the Coronavirus or COVID-19 virus, some events have been or may be cancelled. Many venues will be closed perhaps until the end of the year. Other events may offer online links and connections. To check on the status of a given event, check their website for updates.
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Monday, 04/12/21
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Royal Observatory, Edinburgh

The Discovery of Gravitational Waves – Livestream
A brief (pre)history of the Discovery of Gravitational Waves

Mario Kalomenopoulos

The detection of gravitational waves some years ago, opened a new window to the Universe, created a media fuss and gave a Nobel Prize for Physics! But what is the story behind this discovery? What about the discovery claims of the 60s? And where does Glasgow fit into this mystery? In this talk, we’ll try to answer these questions (and maybe some more) concerning the discovery of these mysterious waves.

Register at weblink to receive connection information

Website: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/online-astronomy-talk-the-discovery-of-gravitational-waves-tickets-139834319213

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/12/21
03:30 PM – 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium

Physics at LHCb – Livestream

I will describe the LHCb experiment that studies decays of b quarks (mass of 5 GeV), and charm quarks (1.5 GeV), and show how studying these particles we are sensitive to physics and new particles at very large mass scales of several TeV and up. Specific measurements of CP violation and tests of lepton flavor universality will be discussed. Strong interactions are also studied; the have detected several particles that do not fit in the simple quark model, such as tetraquarks and pentaquarks.

Speaker: Sheldon Stone, Syracuse Univ.

See weblink for Zoom link.

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/physics-lhcb

Zoom: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/92897631537?pwd=bXVQQXQ1UnQzT2hsYXc1QmNnQnZQdz09

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/12/21 4:15 PM

UC Berkeley

Neutrino Surprises – Livestream

As a graduate student, I had the good fortune of being asked to learn about solar neutrinos, so that I could give an introductory talk on the subject to other graduate students, preparing them for an upcoming colloquium by John Bahcall. This started my life-long interest in neutrinos and created lasting friendships with John and others who were similarly drawn to neutrino problems. I will describe where we stand today, emphasizing the various ongoing activities at Berkeley that are focused on probing the unusual properties of this elusive particle. I’ll conclude by describing N3AS, a new Physics Frontier Center at Berkeley that will open its doors this fall, emphasizing the similarities between the solar neutrino confusion of the 70s and 80s, and N3AS efforts to understand how neutrinos behave in the truly exotic environments produced within supernovae and neutron star mergers.

Speaker: Wick Haxton, UC Berkeley

See weblink for Zoom information

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20210412/neutrino-surprises

Location: Zoom
Meeting ID: 974 7947 3246
Passcode: 627539
https://berkeley.zoom.us/j/97479473246?pwd=QmxXbjllcGhqNlhuSklyTW1iTCsyQT09

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/12/21 4:30 PM

Stanford University

What happened to the kilogram? – Livestream

For 130 years, a cylinder made of a platinum-iridium alloy stored near Paris was the official definition of a kilogram, the basic unit of mass. This all changed on May 20, 2019: a kilogram is now defined by a fundamental constant of nature known as the Planck constant h, which relates the energy of a photon to its frequency: h= 6.62607015 10-34 kilograms times square meters per second.

Sounds complicated? In this talk, I will provide the reasons for changing the definition of the kilogram, give simple explanations what the new kilogram is conceptually, and explain how objects with exactly known masses can be realized using advanced technology.

Speaker: Wolfgang Ketterle, Massachusets Institute of Technology

See weblink for Zoom information.

Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/2021-robert-hofstadter-memorial-lectures

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 04/13/21 3:30 PM

UC Santa Cruz

Water in meteorites: a snapshot of water in the early Solar System – Livestream

Chondritic meteorites are fragments of asteroids that formed in the first few million years of the Solar System history. The similarity between the H isotopic composition of certain chondrites to those of Earth’s water suggests that these chondrites may have been the principal source of Earth’s water. However, the origin and evolution of water in chondrites themselves is a topic of debate, given its potentially significant implications for the dynamical processes in the early Solar System. A particularly less well studied component in chondrites are chondrules, which are small igneous spheres (0.1-1 mm diameter, thought to have formed at high temperatures of ~1700-2100 K and low pressures of 10-6 to 10-3 bars) that comprise between 30 vol.% and 80 vol.% of the chondrites. In this seminar, I will present the results of analyses of water concentration and its isotopic composition (D/H ratio) in chondrules. We found significant variations in water content (8 – 10,200 ppm) and D/H ratio (δD: 77 – 15,000‰, ranging from similar to Earth’s water to ~16 times more D-enriched) in the studied chondrules. I will show that the most likely explanation for our observation is the aqueous alteration processes in the meteorite parent body. However, I will also show evidence that a small amount of water in the chondrules are likely to be primary in origin, and discuss its implications for the partial pressure of water during chondrule formation and the origin of the primary water in chondrules.

Speaker: Kei Shimizu, University of Wisconsin

Zoom information can be found on the EPS advising Google calendar

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/whole-earth-seminars/spring-2021.html

Zoom: https://ucsc.zoom.us/j/91237759104?pwd=NXM3NlRiUDlncU5UKzFHZ01saEZyUT09 (map)

Description
https://ucsc.zoom.us/j/91237759104?pwd=NXM3NlRiUDlncU5UKzFHZ01saEZyUT09
Passcode = 708953

Cost: Free

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Friday, 04/16/21 12:00 PM

Commonwealth Club – Online Event

‘The God Equation ‘ – Livestream

When Isaac Newton established the laws of motion in 1687, he created a foundation of understanding that still guides physicists to scientific discoveries today. As studies evolve, scientists get closer to understanding the deepest mysteries of space and time. Once physicists can successfully combine theories of relativity and quantum mechanics, all forces in the universe will be recognized and tied into one. Physicist Michio Kaku seeks to document this epic journey of uniting theories of space in his new book The God Equation.

Dr. Kaku, once mentored by theoretical physicist Edward Teller, graduated summa cum laude and first in his physics class from Harvard University. Now, Dr. Kaku strives to continue Einstein’s search for a “theory of everything,” seeking to popularize science and unify the four fundamental forces of the universe – the strong force, the weak force, gravity and electromagnetism.

Join us as Michio Kaku talks about physics pioneers looking to understand the complexity of the universe.

Moderator: Kara Platoni, Wired.com

Website: https://www.commonwealthclub.org/events/2021-04-16/dr-michio-kaku-god-equation

Cost: $10 General, discount for Members

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Friday, 04/16/21 12:00 PM

UC Santa Cruz

Paleomagnetic evidence for partial differentiation of planetesimals and long-lived dynamo activity – Livestream

Most meteorites are remnant pieces of planetesimals, the first 1- to 1000-km planetary bodies to form in the solar system. Meteorites are divided into two principal groupings: chondrites (unmelted accretional aggregates) and achondrites (products of planetary melting). This division has commonly been interpreted as evidence that planetesimals either never melted or otherwise melted throughout their entire interiors – a view that is challenged by the idea that some planetesimals were only partially differentiated, with both chondritic and achondritic constituent materials. Understanding the phenomenon of partial differentiation can place important constraints on the timing and mechanism of planetesimal formation and evolution. However, little remains known about the natures and structures of these objects, partly because none have so far been identified in the asteroid population. The IIE iron meteorites contain both achondritic and chondritic silicate inclusions of common origin and are proposed to come from a partially-differentiated body. Here, I will talk about paleomagnetic measurements we conducted on three IIE irons to search for evidence of a molten metallic core in order to constrain the internal structure of the IIE parent planetesimal. We find that the meteorites experienced a magnetic field most likely powered by a core dynamo, implying that metallic core, melted silicates and chondritic material coexisted on the IIE parent body. Combining these measurements with geochronometry data, we constrain the timing of the IIE dynamo, which points towards a structure with a substantial metallic core overlain by achondritic and chondritic silicates. This result further challenges the topology of existing meteorite classification schemes, and provides some constraints on planetary accretion and differentiation mechanisms allowing for the coexistence of melted and unmelted material on the same body.

Speaker: Clara Maurel, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Zoom information can be found on the EPS advising Google calendar

https://calendar.google.com/calendar/u/0/embed?src=epsadvng@ucsc.edu&ctz=America/Los_Angeles

Zoom Meeting 93026775152
Passcode 826619

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/spring-2021.html

Cost: Free

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Friday, 04/16/21 7:30 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers

Lick Observatory Back On Sky: 2020 Wildfire Recovery – Livestream

The 2020 wildfire season saw an unprecedented series of lightning strikes sparking fires across the Bay Area. Located on Mount Hamilton, outside of San Jose, Lick Observatory was directly threatened by these fires and, for the first time in its history, was forced to evacuate.

In this talk I’ll discuss the events leading up to the SCU Lightning Complex fire reaching Lick Observatory, the damage it caused to our site, and the resulting cleanup efforts before our return to operations.

Speaker: Joh Rees, Lick Observatory

See weblink for connection instructions

Website: https://www.trivalleystargazers.org

For non-members if you would like to join the meeting, please send an email to the club president at president@trivalleystargazers.org asking for the meeting link and telling us a bit about your areas of interest in astronomy.

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 04/17/21 7:30 PM

Mount Tamalpias Astronomy Lectures

Black Hole Portrait: How We Got Our First Picture – Livestream

Black holes are among the most remarkable predictions of Einstein’s theory of gravity: so much material is compressed into such a small volume that nothing, not even light, can escape. Black holes have also captured the public imagination, and are commonly featured in popular culture, from Star Trek to Hollywood movies. In Spring 2019, the multinational Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) released the first real (non-Hollywood!) picture of gas around a black hole and the “shadow” cast as that gas swirls in . How did the EHT do it, and what have its combined observations taught us about black holes?

Eliot Quataert, Princeton University

See weblink for Zoom information

Website: https://www.mttamastronomy.org/calendar#h.x0snkek9r9ue

Zoom: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89697734661#success

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 04/17/21 7:00 PM

San Mateo County Astronomical Society

Searching for the Darkest Galaxies: Ultra-Faint Dwarfs as Dark Matter Laboratories – Livestream

How small is the faintest galaxy in the Universe, and what is the nature of the dark matter particle? These seemingly unrelated questions are brought together by so-called “ultra-faint” dwarf galaxies (UFDs). The smallest UFDs contain as few as hundreds of stars and are the most dark matter-dominated systems in the Universe. Modern photometric surveys revolutionized the search for UFDs, more than doubling our census of these extreme systems. Ethan will describe how UFDs provide pristine laboratories for measuring dark matter particle properties. Next-generation observational facilities including the Vera C. Rubin Observatory are expected to discover the entire population of nearby UFDs, pointing to a bright future for these dark galaxies.

Speaker: Ethan Nadler, Stanford University

See weblink for connection information

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/meetings.html

Zoom Meeting ID: 253 926 2920 Passcode: SMCAS or use following link:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/2539262920?pwd=U1puVE1nQVZHUW1vaGUrbGczMGxwQT09

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 04/17/21
09:00 PM – 10:30 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center

Virtual Telescope Viewing – Livestream

Join our resident astronomers on Facebook Live every Saturday evening live from Chabot’s Observation deck!

Each week, our astronomers will guide us through spectacular night sky viewing through Nellie, Chabot‘s most powerful telescope. Weather permitting we will be able to view objects live through the telescopes and our astronomers will be available for an open forum for all of your most pressing astronomy questions.

Other Dates For This Event:
• Saturday, 04/17/21
• Saturday, 04/24/21
• Saturday, 05/01/21
• Saturday, 05/08/21

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/free-telescope-viewings/2021-01-02/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCarFXs-04xmdHW_PVc7LWRg

Cost: Free

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Monday, 04/19/21 4:00 PM

What Physicists Do @ Sonoma State University

From Black Holes to Neural Networks – Livestream

Speaker: Dr. Louise Anderson, Google AI

Website: http://www.phys-astro.sonoma.edu/wpd/wpdcurrent.shtml

Zoom: https://SonomaState.zoom.us/j/87073719017

Cost: Free

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Tuesday, 04/20/21
01:30 PM – 03:00 PM

IEEE

Hubble Telescope Spacecraft – Livestream

The Hubble Space Telescope was the first of NASA’s great observatories in space. It was launched in 1990 and has provided an unbelievable amount of scientific data for over 30 years. This presentation will focus on the Lockheed portion of the Hubble through launch and then show some of the visual results from the Hubble.

Three Lockheed veterans will share their experiences in this webinar.

Register at weblink to receive connection information

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/hubble-telescope-spacecraft-tickets-130125407597

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 04/21/21
11:00 AM – 04:00 PM

SETI Talks: Going Dark: The Mystery of Vanishing Stars – Livestream

Comparing a 70-year-old survey with recent images of the night sky, astronomers have discovered that 100 stars may have gone dark. Those vanishing light sources could be short-lived flashes in the night or possibly, the disappearance of a long-lasting star. These preliminary findings almost certainly represent natural and well-understood events, but there is the hope that they could indicate technological civilizations elsewhere.

Speakers: Beatriz Villaroel, Vanishing & Appearing Sources during a Century of Observations (VASCO); James Davenport, University of Washington

Register at weblink to receive connection information

Website: https://www.seti.org/event/going-dark-mystery-vanishing-stars

Cost: Free

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Wednesday, 04/21/21 7:30 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers

The Dragonfly Mission to Titan, and the Search for Life – Livestream

The Dragonfly mission to Titan is under construction and scheduled to launch in 2027. Titan is the largest Moon of Saturn and has a rich organic chemistry with lakes of liquid methane and ethane on its surface. The goals of the Dragonfly include the search for life. Could life exist in cryogenic liquid methane and ethane?

Speaker: Chris McKay, NASA Ames

See weblink for connection options

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/live-streamed-lectures/

Zoom: https://zoom.us/j/95830904603?pwd=UDNKdm16US9wK1EremdJeGptdjNNdz09

Cost: Free

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Friday, 04/23/21 12:00 PM

UC Santa Cruz

Understanding the Ice Shells of Ganymede and Callisto through Their Impact Crater Records – Livestream

Both Ganymede and Callisto, Jupiter’s two largest moons, host numerous impact craters and basins on their ice shells. Although it is not yet possible to directly probe them, the wide ranges of impact crater sizes provide a possible avenue through which we can begin to understand the internal structures of these ice shells surrounding these moons. Here I will present findings from iSALE models looking at the development of complex craters and multiring basins and the implications for rheologic structure within Ganymede and Callisto’s ice shells. Icy complex craters show an inflection point in their depth-diameter measurements, which we show to be due to a transition from colder, conductive ice at the surface to warmer, convective ice in the subsurface. The depth of this transition indicates that the upper conductive portion of the ice shell has a conductive thermal gradient of approximately 10 K/km. We also set out to test if the onset of multiring basin morphologies are sensitive to the total thickness of the ice shell. Preliminary results show that thinner ice shells and higher thermal conditions – both conductive thermal gradient and convective ice temperature – facilitate multiring basin formation.

Speaker: Evan Bjonnes, Brown University

Zoom information can be found on the EPS advising Google calendar

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/spring-2021.html

Zoom Meeting 93026775152
Passcode 826619

Cost: Free

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Friday, 04/23/21
07:00 PM – 08:00 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center

‘Saving the Dark’ Movie and Panel Discussion – Livestream

“Saving The Dark” is a Documentary Movie on Astronomy and Light Pollution. It is about the significance of Astronomy and the night skies, effects of Light Pollution on Astronomy, human health, wildlife and beyond, what we can do to fight it.

The movie will show what the people in cities are missing out on, the importance of Astronomy in our lives, the impact Astronomy can have on children, how Light Pollution costs a lot of money, affects our health, wildlife and our environment, show the work of nonprofits fighting to preserve dark night skies, tell what people can do at home to fight Light Pollution and talk to cities that have successfully handled this issue.

Panelists:

Film Producer, Sriram Murali
Astronomer, Gerald McKeegan
Astronomer, Richard Ozer

See weblink for Youtube and Facebook Live links

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/saving-the-dark-movie-and-panel-discussion/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTDBIaCsWwc

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 04/24/21 7:00 PM

East Bay Astronomical Society

Observing the Sky: (Some) Astronomical Innovation From Then to Now – PART 2 – Livestream

For more than 2000 years, innovative people have applied their ideas and insights into observing the universe. Unknown thousands of years ago, visual observers named sets of stars from the patterns they saw, sometimes using myths or animals, real or imagined, in their environments for the names. This became a convenience for astrologers and others talking about the sky. Planets were discovered and calendars were invented, and precession was discovered. Even computers and observatories were invented. More than a millennium ago, the first instruments for measuring star positions were invented. Used for surveying and navigation, improvements on these instruments and the developments of new ones led to new discoveries, especially when combined with new mathematical methods for calculation.

The invention of the telescope changed everything. Mountains and craters were visible on the Moon. Those moving points in the sky turned out not to be… worlds(?)! With moons! Telescopes and their mounts were improved, new inventions were adapted, and new methods of observation were applied to old and new problems by astronomers. The spectroscope, chemical photography, and the use of electricity and electronics literally opened up the universe to astronomers.

Continuing innovation on a variety of fronts has led to the present day, and a few years hence, with giant optical telescopes and other telescopes across and outside the electromagnetic spectrum. We can now see nearly to the edge of the visible universe and study processes occurring in the first few minutes of its existence. Amateur astronomers have not been left behind and benefit by many of the same innovations used by the professional community.

Innovations span the spectrum of invention, ideas, analysis, new applications of old and new technology, and even other astronomical discoveries. Learn how innovations have led to many famous, and not so famous but just as important, discoveries about the Solar System, the Galaxy, and the universe around us.

Speaker: Steve Edberg, retired astronomer

See weblink for Facebook live link

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

This talk will be available live and publicly at:
https://www.facebook.com/EastbayAstroSociety/videos/

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 04/24/21
09:00 PM – 10:30 PM

Virtual Telescope Viewing – Livestream

Join our resident astronomers on Facebook Live every Saturday evening live from Chabot’s Observation deck!

Each week, our astronomers will guide us through spectacular night sky viewing through Nellie, Chabot‘s most powerful telescope. Weather permitting we will be able to view objects live through the telescopes and our astronomers will be available for an open forum for all of your most pressing astronomy questions.

Other Dates For This Event:
• Saturday, 04/24/21
• Saturday, 05/01/21
• Saturday, 05/08/21
• Saturday, 05/15/21

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/free-telescope-viewings/2021-01-02/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCarFXs-04xmdHW_PVc7LWRg

Cost: Free

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